G&L Legacy tremolo

Kmaz

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9,171
In build and performance, is the Legacy bridge closer to the Modern or Vintage Fender Stratocaster bridge? Do the guitars (Strat & Legacy) have similar setup specs?
 

cbm

Gold Supporting Member
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6,959
The G&L is a dual fulcrum bridge, so the modern Fender is closer to it.
 

fitz

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2,987
Definitely modern as cbm mentions. The Legacy dual fulcrum vibrato bridge has a little more heft to it than the American Std. In terms of smoothness I believe the G&L is a little better IMO.
 

AdmiralB

Member
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3,060
I think the G&L was the first dual-post bridge. Certainly the first in series production. I also think it's the best non-locking choice.

An added bonus is that you can usually interchange between it and a Floyd Rose, depending upon the tolerance stack on the post spacing (the 'spec' is only different by like half a millimeter or something like that).

I used to get Dan Torres' newsletter, when he was doing partscasters and pickup rewinding circa-1980 or so (before he got into amp modding in a big way). He used to build super Strats with Boogie and Schecter parts, and usually used G&L bridges.
 

Larry Mal

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1,753
As you've read, it's a dual fulcrum which means that it's closer to the modern American Standard type tremolo that Fender uses now.

It's also a well made bridge/tremolo unit, be sure to get it with the steel block in there for the best sound and feel. The arm is able to be connected to the unit by a little Allen nut, so you have a good deal of control over it.

Great guitars.
 

dansworld

Senior Member
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4,318
Yes, it's a modern style bridge with hefty saddles. Funny, contrary to opinion, it sounds pretty vintage even though they aren't stamped steel.

Regardless, it's super smooth and extremely stable. Perhaps a little clunky looking, but that's subjective.
 

Kmaz

Member
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9,171
Yes, it's a modern style bridge with hefty saddles. Funny, contrary to opinion, it sounds pretty vintage even though they aren't stamped steel.

Regardless, it's super smooth and extremely stable. Perhaps a little clunky looking, but that's subjective.
I was thinking the same thing about 'vintage' sound. How does the Legacy bridge steel differ as compared to the modern Fender?
 

dansworld

Senior Member
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4,318
I was thinking the same thing about 'vintage' sound. How does the Legacy bridge steel differ as compared to the modern Fender?

For the Fenders, it's model specific as far as I can tell. The dual fulcrums they use on the Am Std's and such are stamped steel these days! The older ones were like a machined steel...the Custom Shop ones look like they are stainless steel, but they sounded like crap to me.

The G&L is a heavily chrome plated affair but looks like a high quality steel to me.
 

RayBarbeeMusic

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
5,335
In build and performance, is the Legacy bridge closer to the Modern or Vintage Fender Stratocaster bridge? Do the guitars (Strat & Legacy) have similar setup specs?

It's the best non-locking bridge out there, and it whips the living snot out of the FMIC bridges. Similar setup specs? That's up to the user. My Strats and my LPs and my SGs and my jazz boxes have identical setup specs.......
 

VaughnC

Silver Supporting Member
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19,040
In build and performance, is the Legacy bridge closer to the Modern or Vintage Fender Stratocaster bridge? Do the guitars (Strat & Legacy) have similar setup specs?
With its 2 point design, the G&L is closer to a modern 2 point Fender...but the specs are entirely different. Personally, while I prefer the vintage Fender 6 point trem for its contribution to vintage sound, the G&L is considered to be a superior mechanical design.
 

Kmaz

Member
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9,171
If I understand, the G&L Legacy was issued after Leo's death, but the bridge/tremolo was his design?
 

RayBarbeeMusic

Gold Supporting Member
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5,335
If I understand, the G&L Legacy was issued after Leo's death, but the bridge/tremolo design was his design?

Yes, and as a matter of fact, Leo designed the two post trem *PERIOD* while he was "consulting" for music man in the '70s. See if you can find a pic of a late 70s music man guitar with a two post; those preceded every other, including the Floyd. When he started G&L in 1980 he carried it with him. See any trem equipped G&L from then forward.
 
Messages
23,991
I frankly think the FMIC/Fender Modern "two post" bridge is only barely a two post in terms of function and.......

I think that the Vintage and Modern Fender trems are closer together/share much in common in function and effect, and......

The Dual Fulcrum from St. Leo is another creature altogether in so many material ways. Any suggested commonality between the DF and the "modern FMIC" is window dressing. Basically you got G + L Dual Fulcrum trems and you have all of the FMIC in house "semi-trems". The only time IMO when the G + L guitar and Fender guitars have similar trems is when both of them have a Floyd or Kahler or something - or a Bigsby I guess.

I know it does seem weird that Leo & Co. offered both their superb Dual Fulcrum and also Floyds and Kahlers but they sure did. I would say it was the go to company for whammies at one point.
 

lamenlovinit

Member
Messages
3,843
With a properly set up nut (not factory setup, but done by someone who really knows how to cut a nut for bar use), the dual fulcrum is as close to Floyd Rose tuning stability as you will find in a non-locking floating bridge. And yes, I have both :p

In terms of quality and design there is nothing better right out of the box. Note I said "nothing better", not "it's the best". I happen to like PRS trems too (there are differences of course) and think they are at the same level of design, quality, and performance and are more elegant looking. If I could only have one trem guitar, I would be perfectly happy with any of the three, although I would lean towards G&L or PRS for the lack of fiddly-ness with having to carry hex wrenches all the time.
 

RayBarbeeMusic

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
5,335
Before I started playing G&Ls, I played Fenders, and the best I could get out of the two post, if I put a graphtech nut and locking tuners on it, was that it sorta/kinda stayed in tune. If you were careful with it, maybe. Then I got my first G&L, and with sotted tuners and a plastic nut, it stayed in tune better than the Fender with lockers and graphtech....what a revelation. With a slippery nut and locking tuners, as noted above, it's as close to a Floyd as you can get without it being a Floyd, in terms of tuning stability.
 




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