Garcia's Wolf guitar auction today...how much will it sell for?

How much will Garcia's Wolf guitar get auctioned for today - POLL

  • Less than $1M

    Votes: 6 40.0%
  • $1M to $1.5M

    Votes: 5 33.3%
  • $1.5M to $2M

    Votes: 2 13.3%
  • Greater than $2M

    Votes: 2 13.3%

  • Total voters
    15
  • Poll closed .

EricPeterson

Member
Messages
49,043
I doubt the person spending perhaps seven figures or more will be actually playing it. It's a collector's item.

Note: I'm not saying that people who pay that much for a guitar never play it, but I doubt it will be a popular enough musician that has that kind of cash that buys it and gives it the attention it deserves, but I base this on probability alone. Many more multi-millionaires out there that are not pros or even musicians would be interested than otherwise. I could be wrong on all of this though.
I suspect it will be lent out to be played at various festivals, and charity events.
 

EricPeterson

Member
Messages
49,043
Jerry set his later stuff up with higher than normal action and kinda extreme relief in the neck. Light strings, very squirrelly action, very expressive.
By the time I got to Wolf and the Travis Bean he was long gone and the set-up was fairly conventional.
The Wolf was noteable for how quickly the neck picked up reinforcement from the body.
You know how on some guitars the response improves, picks up some weight and authority over the neck to body joint?
That impression began on the Wolf around the 4th fret. The guitar just sang on the top strings immediately.
Super playable. Not the tiniest bit dead or unresponsive in that way we think of some neck-thru types.
I've played all kinds of very cool/rare guitars along the way, and lean heavily toward the old classics, but if offered the best of the old black guard Tele's or grail LP's, I wouldn't hesitate to pick Wolf over any of them.
I don't get the sense the Wolf's response was intentional or designed in.
I'm thinking it was entirely serendipitous, that guitar just worked out. Lucky accident.
It made everything else I ever owned or played feel like a toy.
I know you dont need the gratitude, but I always appreciate when you share your insight and experiences. Thanks for responding.
 

PedalFreak

Supporting Member
Messages
5,895
I doubt the person spending perhaps seven figures or more will be actually playing it. It's a collector's item.

Note: I'm not saying that people who pay that much for a guitar never play it, but I doubt it will be a popular enough musician that has that kind of cash that buys it and gives it the attention it deserves, but I base this on probability alone. Many more multi-millionaires out there that are not pros or even musicians would be interested than otherwise. I could be wrong on all of this though.
The guy who bought it is a huge Deadhead, said he plans on playing it, loaning it out, and that he'll loan it to the Garcia Family anytime they want it.

Jerry set his later stuff up with higher than normal action and kinda extreme relief in the neck. Light strings, very squirrelly action, very expressive.
By the time I got to Wolf and the Travis Bean he was long gone and the set-up was fairly conventional.
The Wolf was noteable for how quickly the neck picked up reinforcement from the body.
You know how on some guitars the response improves, picks up some weight and authority over the neck to body joint?
That impression began on the Wolf around the 4th fret. The guitar just sang on the top strings immediately.
Super playable. Not the tiniest bit dead or unresponsive in that way we think of some neck-thru types.
I've played all kinds of very cool/rare guitars along the way, and lean heavily toward the old classics, but if offered the best of the old black guard Tele's or grail LP's, I wouldn't hesitate to pick Wolf over any of them.
I don't get the sense the Wolf's response was intentional or designed in.
I'm thinking it was entirely serendipitous, that guitar just worked out. Lucky accident.
It made everything else I ever owned or played feel like a toy.
There is a really cool podcast I just listened to, it's mainly about bass, but it talks about the early days of Alembic. The Podcast is through the Fretboard Journal, has Rick Turner, Jack Casady Dan Schwarz, almost 2 hours long. They don't directly talk about Wolf, but there are a few Grateful Dead stories in it, and also they talk about the neck through stuff, and all the electronics that were experimented with.

https://www.fretboardjournal.com/po...ck-casady-dan-schwartz-fretboard-summit-2016/
 

Lance

Member
Messages
10,097
Jerry set his later stuff up with higher than normal action and kinda extreme relief in the neck. Light strings, very squirrelly action, very expressive.
By the time I got to Wolf and the Travis Bean he was long gone and the set-up was fairly conventional.
The Wolf was noteable for how quickly the neck picked up reinforcement from the body.
You know how on some guitars the response improves, picks up some weight and authority over the neck to body joint?
That impression began on the Wolf around the 4th fret. The guitar just sang on the top strings immediately.
Super playable. Not the tiniest bit dead or unresponsive in that way we think of some neck-thru types.
I've played all kinds of very cool/rare guitars along the way, and lean heavily toward the old classics, but if offered the best of the old black guard Tele's or grail LP's, I wouldn't hesitate to pick Wolf over any of them.
I don't get the sense the Wolf's response was intentional or designed in.
I'm thinking it was entirely serendipitous, that guitar just worked out. Lucky accident.
It made everything else I ever owned or played feel like a toy.
Wow! Coming from you that is one helluvan endorsement!!
I was going to ask how it compared to your P-90 Goldtop. Thanks for answering it before I even asked.
 

kimock

Member
Messages
12,525
Wow! Coming from you that is one helluvan endorsement!!
I was going to ask how it compared to your P-90 Goldtop. Thanks for answering it before I even asked.
Wolf crushed my entire woodpile, and you know I'm holding some good stuff.
I don't think people appreciate how much better some of the truly top-shelf stuff is.
I know I didn't.
I literally couldn't pick up any of my guitars for at least a week.
 

Jacob Van Noy

Member
Messages
615
Wolf crushed my entire woodpile, and you know I'm holding some good stuff.
I don't think people appreciate how much better some of the truly top-shelf stuff is.
I know I didn't.
I literally couldn't pick up any of my guitars for at least a week.
Damn, this is kind of blowing my mind. I've read some of thoughts on Wolf before but was unaware of this neck/body reinforcement thing. I can just imagine it though and it has to be a joy to play. I've always noticed how much the middle and upper registers on Wolf sang even with a bright pushed clean sound. Makes sense now, thanks for sharing.

I've always entertained the idea of getting a Wolf like guitar but every neck-through I've played has left me slightly cold. I actually really dig the way they would emphasize the fundamental and sustained but coming from a Strat/Tele bolt-on background I somehow really missed the mash of overtones (character is maybe a better word?) you get with bolt-on guitars plus the quickness and personality of the attack.

Sounds like Wolf somehow wound up with the optimum balance in these areas. There is a ton of character in the attack on Wolf and it sings. Magic guitar for a magic man!

I'm curious if the new Walker 'Heavy' you have was an attempt to get Wolf-ish? But then you say Wolf isn't all that heavy. Either way, I thought you guys nailed a new formula with the Heavy. It's got amazing attack and all those other qualities you hear in a great heavy laminate guitar in a loud band.

I find this very interesting and thank you for your sharing!
 

kimock

Member
Messages
12,525
Damn, this is kind of blowing my mind. I've read some of thoughts on Wolf before but was unaware of this neck/body reinforcement thing. I can just imagine it though and it has to be a joy to play. I've always noticed how much the middle and upper registers on Wolf sang even with a bright pushed clean sound. Makes sense now, thanks for sharing.

I've always entertained the idea of getting a Wolf like guitar but every neck-through I've played has left me slightly cold. I actually really dig the way they would emphasize the fundamental and sustained but coming from a Strat/Tele bolt-on background I somehow really missed the mash of overtones (character is maybe a better word?) you get with bolt-on guitars plus the quickness and personality of the attack.

Sounds like Wolf somehow wound up with the optimum balance in these areas. There is a ton of character in the attack on Wolf and it sings. Magic guitar for a magic man!

I'm curious if the new Walker 'Heavy' you have was an attempt to get Wolf-ish? But then you say Wolf isn't all that heavy. Either way, I thought you guys nailed a new formula with the Heavy. It's got amazing attack and all those other qualities you hear in a great heavy laminate guitar in a loud band.

I find this very interesting and thank you for your sharing!
The neck-thru thing is tricky, there's so much stiffness and rigidity in the basic design that there's no way to get them to behave like a bolt-on or set neck.
I'm reasonably convinced Garcia adopted the extreme relief strategy with the later Irwin's to address that "overly efficient" fundamental presentation.
I can't say exactly why it happens, but as the relief increases and the action goes up on the neck-thru, you get a little closer to a normal plucked string sound, "plunk", relative to the same guitar with the action low and the neck straight.
That's how it seems on mine anyway.
 

Jacob Van Noy

Member
Messages
615
The neck-thru thing is tricky, there's so much stiffness and rigidity in the basic design that there's no way to get them to behave like a bolt-on or set neck.
I'm reasonably convinced Garcia adopted the extreme relief strategy with the later Irwin's to address that "overly efficient" fundamental presentation.
I can't say exactly why it happens, but as the relief increases and the action goes up on the neck-thru, you get a little closer to a normal plucked string sound, "plunk", relative to the same guitar with the action low and the neck straight.
That's how it seems on mine anyway.
Interesting, it seems to
make sense to me about the rigidity factor and the steps taken to get back some of that character of a less rigid neck joint/guitar. Plus, a guitar with high action and lots of relief is certainly expressive and fun to play if you can get the intonation to behave which seems to be accomplished by intonating the 12th fret and above slightly flat? I like that idea because when getting expressive with an upper register note you won't be wildly sharp the whole time.
 

Fred_C

Member
Messages
512
Seeing as how last month was the 40th anniversary of the great May 77 shows, with new remastered material released, I have been listening to a lot of Jerry and Wolf. As good as that is, I think 2/3/78 may be tops for that era. I am heavily biased against 1978, partially because the wheels seemed to start falling off, and also because of Bob's slide playing, so I generally avoid it. In spite of myself I stumbled on Dicks picks 18 last week. It is is an amazing recording, with a bit of another night thrown in, but here it is on the archive for a quick listen. Jerry/Wolf sound like a hot knife thru butter the entire way through. There is a treat in almost every note and phrase he plays.

 

55hz

Member
Messages
3,579
Seeing as how last month was the 40th anniversary of the great May 77 shows, with new remastered material released, I have been listening to a lot of Jerry and Wolf. As good as that is, I think 2/3/78 may be tops for that era. I am heavily biased against 1978, partially because the wheels seemed to start falling off, and also because of Bob's slide playing, so I generally avoid it. In spite of myself I stumbled on Dicks picks 18 last week. It is is an amazing recording, with a bit of another night thrown in, but here it is on the archive for a quick listen. Jerry/Wolf sound like a hot knife thru butter the entire way through. There is a treat in almost every note and phrase he plays.

They brought a harpsichord on this show, huh?
 

caspersvapors

Supporting Member
Messages
2,226
Seeing as how last month was the 40th anniversary of the great May 77 shows, with new remastered material released, I have been listening to a lot of Jerry and Wolf. As good as that is, I think 2/3/78 may be tops for that era. I am heavily biased against 1978, partially because the wheels seemed to start falling off, and also because of Bob's slide playing, so I generally avoid it. In spite of myself I stumbled on Dicks picks 18 last week. It is is an amazing recording, with a bit of another night thrown in, but here it is on the archive for a quick listen. Jerry/Wolf sound like a hot knife thru butter the entire way through. There is a treat in almost every note and phrase he plays.

78 is full of truly great shows man. And I hear a marked difference in Jerrys playing between Wolf and the TB-500. Not just in the tone but how he played.
 

Jacob Van Noy

Member
Messages
615
78 is full of truly great shows man. And I hear a marked difference in Jerrys playing between Wolf and the TB-500. Not just in the tone but how he played.
Care to expand on that? As in, how he played differently. I find that era great as well. I was under the impression that the May '77 shows was the TB-500 and he got back into Wolf that fall?
 

The Captain

Member
Messages
12,451
The neck-thru thing is tricky, there's so much stiffness and rigidity in the basic design that there's no way to get them to behave like a bolt-on or set neck.
I'm reasonably convinced Garcia adopted the extreme relief strategy with the later Irwin's to address that "overly efficient" fundamental presentation.
I can't say exactly why it happens, but as the relief increases and the action goes up on the neck-thru, you get a little closer to a normal plucked string sound, "plunk", relative to the same guitar with the action low and the neck straight.
That's how it seems on mine anyway.
That was sweet playing on After Midnight, but I'm a JJ Cale tragic.
I have a really nice neck-through Japanese ESP, with mahogany wings, quilted maple cap, JB/Jazz wiht coli tap, ebony fretboard. The single coil tones on that snap and plunk to produce way better Strat tones than my recent;y acquired Mexi Strat does.
It has never occurred to me to think of neck-through guitars as dull, cos that's the only one i've spent any time with.
I would postulate that the combination of good maple neck, mahogany top and ebony fretboard overcomes any design limitations.
I have a new neck-through guitar coming, which will be built at WMI, with maple neck, ebony, but just a maple veneer. It has low wind pups which will also tap. It will be interesting to hear the differences.
 




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