George L Cables - Coiling up (rant)

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by SFT, Apr 16, 2015.

  1. SFT

    SFT Member

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    Got a couple 20 foot George L cables recently and can't get them to straighten out! They keep coiling up no matter how I try to straighten the damn things. Never had a cable do that before.....GRRR. Anyone else have this problem?
     
  2. slybird

    slybird Member

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    I purchased George L to wire up my rack. I cut them to just a bit more than the length needed. No coiling issues what so ever. They didn't improve the sound. IMO not worth the money. Normal everyday cables work just as well.

    George L wire is thin and stiff. If I ever wanted to use it full length I would lay it out flat in the room for a few days to relax the wire's curve.
     
  3. Able Grip

    Able Grip Member

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    GL wire is very low impedance, which is a good thing.
     
  4. Tiny Montgomery

    Tiny Montgomery Supporting Member

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    Low capacitance. Cables don't have an "impedance."
     
  5. SFT

    SFT Member

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    I bought the cables pre-cut/made, so they came all coiled up in the original package. Just sucks that the wire is so stiff, because that's what's causing the problem. I've laid it out, stretched and twisted it to try and get it straight, but after a day or two, it curls back up to the point of a knot almost.
     
  6. yawiney

    yawiney Member

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    Still a good thing.
    I have one that I use from board to amp when I'm siting and want my amp close. I think it's less than 5ft long and I still have to be very gentle in letting it uncoil the way it wants to to get it to length.
     
  7. 8len8

    8len8 Member

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    Cables do have impedance. It's just that guitar cables aren't spec'd that way.
     
  8. SHOOTOUT!

    SHOOTOUT! Member

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    George L's cable is well known for its low capacitance, and comes in two sizes.

    Bulk Guitar Cable Capacitance Chart

    However there are some more modern alternatives these days.

    It is also however know to be rather a stiff cable, and another that is a bit stiff for example is Klotz AC110, the latter mainly I think because it has a solid PE rather than foam PE insulation (had some for myself once but didn't use it due to the handling). You'll also find some solid copper signal wire cables that are stiff as a result in the upper end of the 'boutique' market.

    Sommer LLX is lower capacitance still and yet soft due to the foamed PE insulation and outer jacket formulation. It also has a large diameter and the superior braided rather than spiral shield making the handling all the more remarkable.

    Regarding the 'sound'... the capacitance will only make any audible difference with passive pickups and before the first buffer the signal hits. For the whole length from guitar to amp to be considered then all pedals would need to be true bypass.

    The benefit of using low capacitance cable is that it give options i.e. using a longer cable for all situations for the same tone at home/studio/gig and if more capacitance is needed some cable can be put into a true bypass loop for example, perhaps before dirt pedals.

    Regarding capacitance, it would be a mistake to think that lower total capacitance is more likely to lead to an ice picky sound... it all depends upon the peak resonant frequency and Henries of the pickup, combined with total cable capacitance before first buffer and the device (pedal or amp) input impedance. The peak frequency and high frequency roll off moves around depending upon the capacitance and the input impedance.

    I know what you mean, when a cable behaves like an unpassified snake, it gets annoying real quick! Guitarists have highly varied patience with such things... so others will not find it to be too annoying. My own patience with badly behaved snakes is let's just say... very limited!

    Cheers,

    Marc, Director
    SHOOTOUT! Guitar Cables, UK

    P.S. Just a thought that all cables will take on a bend from storage and stiffer cables with more 'memory' will be especially vulnerable to for example being on the inner smaller diameter of a bulk spool for some time, or following cut and coil for packing etc.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2015
  9. Ryan84

    Ryan84 Member

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    Cables don't have impotence.

    That one we can all agree on.
     
  10. Blix

    Blix Supporting Member

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    Lyric HG must be made with Viagra, stiffest cable ever.
     
  11. Brien

    Brien Member

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    Cables must be trained by wrapping with proper "over under" technique. Once they get all ratty and tangled it's hard to retrain them. This goes for any cables but GL's are more prone to tangle. I've been using some of the same GL's for 15 years-perfectly straight.
     
  12. NewDr.P

    NewDr.P Member

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    id never use a solderless cable for a long cable, guitar- board or board - amp. those connections need to be soldered if theres any movement/ stress on the cables.

    those are intended for pedalboards, racks, etc.
     
  13. reversedelay

    reversedelay Member

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  14. Jmango

    Jmango Member

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    I would actually love to solve for this issue as well... I have a few George L cables that I have had since the early 2000's and it is bullet straight. I just bought two lengths of cable (.225) and it is infuriating - I cannot stretch it, wring it or do anything to get it to not want to coil. It is such a PITA when trying to sit at my DAW to play... I have a 12' length that just curls up.... Pisses me off.

    Can it be laid in the sun on asphalt for a day or something with weight stretching it out???? I know it seems trivial, but it really does suck...
     
  15. gibs5000

    gibs5000 Member

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    George Ls cables are good for pedalboards when you want to make custom lengths. They are garbage when you using longer length cables, they weren't designed to go from your guitar to your board/amp, if you want a cable that doesn't tangle up like the GL cable, get a standard guitar cable
     
  16. Tom Von Kramm

    Tom Von Kramm Vendor

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    I love George L's, but I only use them as pedal interconnects.
     
    gibs5000 likes this.
  17. scolfax

    scolfax Member

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    I have the same problem with my Fulltone Gold Standards.
     

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