George Thorogood Sky is Crying

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by rwmct, Apr 27, 2016.

  1. rwmct

    rwmct Member

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    Damn. You can have your shredding or your jazzy solos or your technical displays or your candidates for GOAT, whether Prince, Clapton, Page, whatever.

    I would rather be able to do this:

     
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  2. JilaX^

    JilaX^ Member

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    Why do that when you can do this?

     
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  3. rwmct

    rwmct Member

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    Oh, I love listening to Elmore James too. But that is more straight blues, and GT rocks it up quite a bit. It does not get more rock and roll, IMO, than GT in a wife beater, sweat dripping off, playing in front of a packed house with the temperature soaring and the beer flowing, the sax honking behind.

    I love how you went right to the source, though, because that is another great thing about GT: he is an evangelist. When "Move it on Over" came out, and I found that the tune had first been recorded in 1947, I had to check out Hank Williams. One Bourbon One Scotch One Beer? Had to check out this John Lee Hooker guy. Albert Collins or Elvin Bishop on stage next to George? Explore what they are about. References to Hound Dog Taylor, etc. Check it out.

    He is an evangelist. But in a fun kind of way.
     
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  4. 8raw

    8raw Member

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    I'm with you. Between George and the Rolling Stones, I've learned about some great guys from song credits. Plus George seems to take those songs so seriously, with respect, he really drives them home.
     
  5. boo radley

    boo radley Supporting Member

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    This isn't musician bashing (never!), but I don't understand how George Thorogood & The Destroyers locked into commercial success recycling classic blues from John Lee Hooker, Elmore James, etc., and so many blues guitar-fronted bands didn't....
     
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  6. karmadave

    karmadave Member

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    While I mostly agree, you can also look at Thorogood's success as helping expose these artists to a wider audience. Also, while Thorogood's rendition of 'The Sky Is Crying' is truer to the Elmore James version I prefer Stevie Ray Vaughn's version. Nothing like SRV channeling Albert King to get the juices flowing. How many people would even know about Albert if it were not for Stevie?
     
  7. rwmct

    rwmct Member

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    Especially when you add that his first big hit was a Hank Williams tune first recorded in 1947.

    I think a lot of it is presentation. He is not an archivist. He delivers these tunes with great tone and execution, and brings a lot of the feel of the originals, but he rocks them up just the right amount. His vocal delivery is perfect for the tunes he plays. And he has very particular kind of swagger to him that is ballsy without being too surly, and he manages to appear to be having a great time up there. (On a good night, I believe he genuinely is having a great time up there).
     
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  8. rwmct

    rwmct Member

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    I prefer these (and other versions, including the originals (not sure how many times Elmore James cut the tune) at different times, when I am in different moods.

    "The Sky is Crying,", IMO, is like "Key to the Highway." You can't have too many good versions of either tune, IMO.
     
  9. Tommy Biggs

    Tommy Biggs Member

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    I always preferred GT doing that kind of thing to the 'hits', about drinkin' and wimmins. I'm not much of a fan when he's chasing hits.
    I saw him after the first album - a little 1x12 combo up on a folding chair. that was pretty cool.
    Sure - I'm way more of a fan of the real bluesmen and their versions of these songs, but a wise man once said "you can't have too many versions of some things".

     
  10. boo radley

    boo radley Supporting Member

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    I think you're right -- vocals, song selection, and 'rocking it up.' The formula ZZ Top perfected (although a different order of magnitude in originality and musicianship).
     
  11. GCDEF

    GCDEF Supporting Member

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    His heyday was in the 70s, when blues hadn't become the worn out cliche it is today and it was a time when rock and blues were much more intertwined than they are today.
     
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  12. jackson

    jackson Supporting Member

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    IIRC, he played the bar scene for a long time, and became known for his live shows. He picked good songs to cover, and he plays that one style very well.
     
  13. sixty2strat

    sixty2strat Member

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    You had to see him live back when he was small time, JC Dobbs on south St in Philly. Great shows tones, fender bassman or bandmaster and old P-90 ES guitar with great showmanship and gritty and raw and no noodling. Very much a throwback in the EVH era. Then he hit the big time and made the choice to sell out and get produced but most of all get rich. Can't blame him but he became a different thing.
     
  14. sixty2strat

    sixty2strat Member

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    I'll take his version of Sky over SRV's and like his tone better....CALL ME A HERATIC
     
  15. ripgtr

    ripgtr Member

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    Me. ;-)
    heck, when I first hit CA, went over to some club in SF and there was a guy doing a bunch of Albert stuff. Can't remember his name offhand.
    Heard a lot of his stuff on the juke box at Eli's in Oakland, too.
    course knew who he was before that. He was pretty well known in the blues listener circle, which was a lot bigger in the early 70s when I was a kid, what with Cream playing Albert songs and all.

    Lots of versions.
    Elmore's has always been my personal fav.
     
  16. ripgtr

    ripgtr Member

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    I saw George in the mid 70s, right after he got 'famous', as some collage.
    Being a die hard blues guy at the time, didn't know what to expect, but I really enjoyed it. He did a lot of Chuck Berry kind of stuff, and that was fun too.
     
  17. rwmct

    rwmct Member

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    Yeah, but a guy has to have some copyrights on his albums.
     
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  18. rwmct

    rwmct Member

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    I don't disagree. SRV is a master at the guitar pyrotechnics, but Lonesome George often has amazing tone, IMO. That video I started with, I just think it is perfect for what he is doing.
     
  19. Polynitro

    Polynitro Member

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    just the cool ones with good ears.

    johnny winter turned me on to all those people.
    I saw JW, SRV, and GT all the same year and by far JW was the best show.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2016
  20. sixty2strat

    sixty2strat Member

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    Honestly George got me hunting for one of my key tone I use to this day, the clean but gritty dig in and it breaks up more, loved that tone so unlike what you were hearing in 79-81 on Philly radio. With all the amps with built in drive or every kid using a fuzz box to cover up their lack of skill, who knew it was just a cranked tube amp
     

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