Gibson Country Western Adjustable Saddle

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by themusicboxstudios, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. themusicboxstudios

    themusicboxstudios Member

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    [​IMG]

    69 Country Western here. The guitar sounds great. Nice boomy/tight bottom end. The guitar is a tad bit "glassy" ... in other words ... i'm getting a little more attack or picking sound than I really like.

    How would the sound change if I swapped out the saddle (not the whole bridge) for a bone or ivory saddle? Would changing the nut made a difference?

    Jon
     
  2. Ogre

    Ogre Member

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    I strongly recommend changing your saddle to bone. The nut will not make as much of a difference(it may already be bone), but it will be noticable when you play open strings. Somebody somewhere may disagree, but I think the adjustable saddles(which first appeared as an option in 1957) are tone killers.
     
  3. Whiskeyrebel

    Whiskeyrebel Member

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    They made ceramic saddles for the ADJ bridges. Try ceramic.

    And make sure the nuts inside under the bridge plate are well cinched down.

    Are you getting any lifting or separation under the pin end of your bridge?
     
  4. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    +1 lose that awful adjustable saddle and all the heavy nuts and bolts associated with it (ok, not "lose", but "carefully remove and stash in a baggie") and have a nice bone saddle installed.
     
  5. themusicboxstudios

    themusicboxstudios Member

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    i don't want the whole bridge to be taken off. i can still put on a nicer saddle right?
     
  6. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    absolutely, either by fashioning a big bone saddle that fills the whole slot, or by using hardwood spacers to hold a normal-thickness saddle in place. the whole idea is to do it without permanent alteration to the instrument. even removing the 2 big metal threaded inserts under the top (using a soldering iron to soften any glue holding them in there) is a reversible procedure.
     
  7. lamf

    lamf Member

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    tusq makes a replacement saddle try that much less expensive than the ceramic(and easier to find)
     
  8. Tuberoast

    Tuberoast Silver Supporting Member

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    I put a rosewood insert into my adj hole (it was slotted) then put the saddle in , much better sounding. The insert has to go in tight and obviously you have to take the bolts out, no GLUE! just force it in then put the saddle in; all this is reversible.
     
  9. David Collins

    David Collins Member

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    I'm usually very hesitant to advise modifying a vintage instrument, but these Gibson adjustable bridges are a common exception. The vintage market doesn't mind much as of yet, as it really does make a difference. I'm an advocate of not only plugging the slot and recutting for a standard saddle, but pulling the bridge and removing that pile of dead mass in the brass hardware. Plug the holes, then at that point you could either replace the bridge or plug the slot and cut a new one for a 1/8" bone saddle. It really can make a noticeable difference.
     

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