Gibson ES 125 TDC and ES 225 TD - difference?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by elsewherejacob, Oct 23, 2008.

  1. elsewherejacob

    elsewherejacob Member

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    Lately I've been checking the internet on the es 125 tdc, when I found the 225 td in a youtube video. To me, they look very much alike from the outside, but I didn't find a lot of information on the 225 - can somebody tell me the difference please??
    thanks
     
  2. Smakutus

    Smakutus Member

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    The ES-225 comes with the early Les Paul/ES-295 wrap around bridge which didn't work well on a LP but works fine on my 295. The 225 also came with either one of two P-90 pickups. The one pick up version came with the pick up in the middle of the guitar rather than but the bridge or by the neck.

    I'm pretty sure the ES-125 TDC is the type guitar George Thorogood plays but I'm sure his are modded a bit.

    Both cool guitars.

    Jeff
     
  3. shawntp

    shawntp Member

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    Sounds like the 225 preceded the 125 and perhaps there was some transition plan between them within Gibson with all the various 125 offerings they had.

    From "http://www.provide.net/~cfh/gibson4.html"

    Gibson ES-125TD discontinued 1964 (T/D - Thin / Dual Pickup model)
    1956 to 1970
    Collectibility Rating: D

    Gibson ES-225 discontinued 1959.
    Available: 1955 to 1959
    Collectibility Rating: one pickup models: C, two pickup models: C
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2008
  4. hotrox

    hotrox Member

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    The two are very different guitars IMO. The 125TDC is completely hollow and much more prone to feedback. The 225TD actually has a block of wood mounted to the top under the bridge area. This is not a through block like a 335 but it does cut down on feedback quite a bit. If you compare the two models in hand the 225 has slightly more elegant lines and build features at the neck joint area. 225's definitely have a better overall build. By the time Gibson went to the 125TDC and discontinued the 225TD it appears they had more of a budget product in mind. That being said 125's are cool fun and affordable. I had a bunch of them until I found my 225TD. My 225TD can go from Buddy Holly to AC/DC onstage with very little feedback, my 125's just weren't as flexible and versatile.
     
  5. elsewherejacob

    elsewherejacob Member

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  6. Hammertone

    Hammertone Member

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    Also, ES-225T models tend to have nice neck profiles that fill the hand properly. ES-125TC models tend to have skinny wanker necks.
    :argue
     
  7. jp1977

    jp1977 Member

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    the 225 has neck binding while the 125 has none, the profiles seem to be the same most of the time as long as the year corresponds. The 225 was considered a higher model. I once owned a 125 dc that was the same almost as an old p90 equipped 175 that played and sounded beautiful.
     
  8. gitarzilla

    gitarzilla Member

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    This.

    225s are very cool. Somewhat overlooked and can sometimes be a bargain in the vintage market. IMHO, because of that anti-feedback block they're far superior to the 125 and the 330 for that matter. The 125 is really kind of a quasi-student model, which is cool if you want something for just shedding around the house, songwriting, recording, etc. But the 225, with its bound neck, the block, etc, is a definite step up. That being said, a nice early - mid 60s 2 p/u 125 in good shape for low dough would make a solid player and modest investment, especially in the rarer dark vintage sunburst vs the the mroe common cherry burst. Even cooler and rarer is the deep bodied version -- kind of a poor-man's 175.

    Almost forgot: when shopping for 125s, be mindful that they can be prone to neck set problems -- many have had or need a neck set, and the arched tops tend to loose their arch sometimes after years of pressure and neglect, especially if stored for a long time with heavier strings. Both problems are easily detectible -- it'll either be unplayable becasue the action is way to high, or the strings will be nearly laying on the fretboard. Beware of bridges that are adjusted to their extreme one way or the other. Both problems can be corrected by a good tech.
     
  9. Drew816

    Drew816 Supporting Member

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    ...which I prefer. :p

    I have access to two 50's 225's (one two and one single centered P-90 pickup models) and they are GREAT guitars. The 125's of this era had no body cuts, like an acoustic with a pickup. However for me the necks are typical big fat 50's Gibson profiles; here are the measurements of the '58, 1st, 3rd, 7th and 12th frets and a pretty wide 1 11/16ths+ nut width:

    1958 Gibson ES-225
    1 11/16th : 1.695
    0.864
    0.909
    0.954
    1.101

    It's a beautiful guitar, sounds and plays great, just too big a neck for my little hands. They're not cheap and you really have to shop around and INSURE you're getting one that's not been messed with, the later 125's a likely half the price but a different animal as well.

    So the later 60's 125's with their narrow nut width's but still a pretty good sized (medium to medium plus) profile work better for me. I don't own one, I looked and looked and bought a '67 330 as it was only a few more dollars at the time and now I'm really glad I did because they're jumped in value and is a smoking guitar! BUT if I could find an un-butchered 125 I'd snag it but again you have to be able to play these era Gibson necks.

    And yes, George T played a later 60's 125 as one of his main guitars; not sure what others he snagged over time but I'm sure he had a mix as time went on...
     
  10. musicofanatic5

    musicofanatic5 Supporting Member

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    As stated the 225 is a superior inst, and the t.p. is the key. Not for everyone, but if you're hip, you'll dig the sound. Additionally, I have a hard time considering any Gbsn w/out f.b. binding a Gbsn!
     
  11. billmcd

    billmcd Member

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    Not sure if you are still interested...

    I have a 1962 Epiphone Sorrento made in Kalamazoo by Gibson. It is the equivalent of a Gibson ES 125 with single Florentine cutaway.

    It is a TDN (thin/dual/natural) with the narrow nut (1 & 1/2") and pretty good profile that you mention.

    I have owned it for 32 years and the only thing I've done is a professional refret job. The luthier tried to buy it, afterwards, because he had small hands.

    The tuners were replaced with Grovers when I bought it. I've never had any problems at all. The mini-humbuckers work and the finish has checking.
    No modifications have been done.

    Let me know if you'd like to know more.
     
  12. RnB

    RnB Member

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    eleswherejacob: PM sent
     

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