Gibson es 347 -v- Gibson Lucille

a player

Senior Member
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241
Grant Green had no problem to sound jazzy with ES-330 :)

But the ultimate jazz tone is indeed the L-5, you can hear the difference
when Wes played a 175 on earlier records, sounds more raw and unrefined..
The L-5 is smoooth.. just sings. Long scale, ebony fretboard/maple neck, big body..

I believe L-5 is smooth, but its too big .. I'm hardly coping with es-175 thus I'm looking for 335 like shape (or preferably 347 :cool:)//


:huh
 

django49

Member
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1,789
Back in the day (mid-80s), the 347s were all over LA and usually changed hands at under $500. Where is my time machine?

I sold my last one (black with gold, very "Lucille") a year or so ago for right at $2k. Once upon a time it was my "forever guitar". But I eventually went on to things I liked better. Great guitars. Loved the coil split. Just be sure you like the more modern "Dirty Finger" pickups as they are more "in your face" than the typical 335/"PAF" types.
 

a player

Senior Member
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241
The question now is if the 1992-1992 347's are also equipped with Dirty Fingers or something else???
 

robertkoa

Member
Messages
4,121
347 Excellent for Fusion and Steely Dannish/Urban kind of Fusion I do...

Has a nice naturally thick dark tone on the Neck in Humbucker Mode which some

Jazz Guys might like , the Guys who like Semi Hollows for Jazz ..

With the neck pickup in Parallel , and the right Strings, maybe some of that Benson
Bounce, but 347 is sustainy Santana, Carlton etc. and unique in single coil modes.

It was a long time ago and I don't play trad Jazz , but that neck in Single Coil was great even with medium high gain.
,
 

qblue

Member
Messages
1,036
Would anyone know if dirty fingers were installed even in 1990 347's, or just in early ones?

I am sorry for resurrecting this thread, but I had to answer to some things seen earlier in this thread.

I have the Series 7 pickups in my 1990 ES-347 (see my avatar), aka Dirty Fingers with gold covers. I read a guy claims he has '57 Classics installed in his, but if the coil-tap works then it isn't true as the Classics would have to have 4 leads. They didn't make those style pickups until 2010 or so, not in those early '90s version.

I am really digging this guitar since I got it new in 1993. I really don't think it would change in sound with the '57 Classics or the 490/498 pickups, as they are all modeled after the '57 PAF style pickups. I think the semihollow style of all the thinlines with the laminates make them similar in sound. The 347's coil-tap makes for a useful addition in sound of the guitar, thinning out the huge response from the humbuckers, to the skinnier lean sound after tapping. It ain't no Fender clean, but the effect is a cutting sound in a band mix.
 

robertkoa

Member
Messages
4,121
The 347 is quite heavy so if 2+ hours of playing is uncomfortable for you I don't think the 347 will help.

I play a lot of jazz on my 347 and get great tones. What year is the 347 you're looking at?

The first thing you'll need to do if you do buy it is have all the pots switched out for 500K. The guitar is much too muddy with the stock pots.

Personally, I love the extremely hot pickups that came in mine (16K!) and they also sound great split, but it should be noted that the pickups and a few of the other choices about the guitar make it sound more like an LP than a 335; so if you're looking for a typical 335 type sound you'd have to change the pickups at the very least.
I played an ES 137 briefly a few days ago and even though the looks are totally different...it reminded me of the 347 I used to own in Tone and weight even unplugged..a little more acoustic resonance than 347 but dark in a good way....
But 347 is a cooler Guitar IMO...

Again a Lucille with coil cut switch in one of the Pots might be even better..never played a Lucille...
 

Synex7254

Member
Messages
988
Question for the ES-347 (and Lucille too) owners out there. Curious as to how many of you actually use the Varitone Switch versus just leaving it in a static position? Always wondered and only have played a ES-345 in a store and personally wasn't too impressed with the tonal variations and thought if I did own one, probably wouldn't use it much.
 

robertkoa

Member
Messages
4,121
I remember that neck pickup Coil Cut to single coil sounding great..

Wish I still had my 347 because I am looking for something that will get vaguely close to an ES 175
and still I will have switches ...for single coil etc.
I never realized those pickups were 16 k..
That's why they sounded so good in single coil mode...lol.
 

Flogger59

Member
Messages
10,782
Question for the ES-347 (and Lucille too) owners out there. Curious as to how many of you actually use the Varitone Switch versus just leaving it in a static position? Always wondered and only have played a ES-345 in a store and personally wasn't too impressed with the tonal variations and thought if I did own one, probably wouldn't use it much.
The Varitone in my old 345 is quite useful, I use 1, 2, and 3 a lot to go between comping and lead tones. Pile on a ton of gain, put it on 6 with both pickups out of phase and it sounds like an Octavia.
 

StanG

Member
Messages
4,660
If I were looking for a traditional jazz tone but was uncomfortable with a full depth archtop, I would be looking at fully hollow thinlines like the 330, or any number of others without a center block. Of course jazz can be played on any guitar. But a fully hollow guitar will get much closer to trad archtop tone. Grant Green was a favorite of mine and he recorded a lot of his work with a 330.

This may only muddy the waters, but another option in that regard, is a late 70's 335, with the trapeze tailpiece and smaller block under the bridge. They definitely, in my experience, as I owned a '78, have an "airier" sound than other 335's. They do have the narrower nut width and really low frets, but before jumping to internet based conclusions on what is good and bad, know that the narrower nut Gibsons often have a deeper neck profile, that, to some degree, offsets the narrower nut. Only you can decide if it works for you.

I sold the '78 to get a more recent, at the time, 2005 335. That was a mistake, even though the '78 was pretty cramped near the nut. I also had a '67 330 with the narrow nut, that had a deep enough neck profile that there were no playability issues for me. I wish I still had that guitar. I can't remember what I sold it to get, but I think it was a sound decision at the time.

Also, and again, imo, the more recent epi casinos that come stock with Gibson P-90's can fill that slot for comparatively low dollars.
 

qblue

Member
Messages
1,036
Question for the ES-347 (and Lucille too) owners out there. Curious as to how many of you actually use the Varitone Switch versus just leaving it in a static position? Always wondered and only have played a ES-345 in a store and personally wasn't too impressed with the tonal variations and thought if I did own one, probably wouldn't use it much.
The ES-347 has no Varitone switch. I can't comment on how useful it is. For some reason it detracts from the collectability of a 345/355/BBKing variant. Nowadays most ES-355 are Mono versions and don't have the switch, but they have that damn Bigsby vibrato unit on them. This makes the 355, without a Bigsby, a ES-347.

I have a L6-S that has a switch that looks similar to the Varitone switches on a BBKing and ES-345, but they are totally different animals.
 




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