Gibson Forcing Workers To Work During Co-Vid19

Status
Not open for further replies.

BlueRiff

Senior Member
Messages
6,193
This is one of the dumbest things you could say. Any decent manager knows that without the managed, no work gets done. My company put labor on par with management re: prevention when things started heading south.

I’m sure that at the C-level they are less worried about their financial outlook than the rest of us, but in the case of my company, the decisions those people made to this point have kept me fed and sheltered for twenty years.
But you don't look well - your skin has a green hue and I can't even see the whites of your eyes - which are huge! Have you called your doctor?!?! :p:p
 

eoengineer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,149
Agree - this virus is exposing the economy to be very ‘soft’ (once again) - little savings overall, still highly leveraged with credit and massive debt.

And I hate to say it, but the cost of health care is dragging the whole economy down - after taking care of an aged parent for five years I can say society and tax payers are making huge sacrifices to support the frail, as they always have.

I haven’t seen a doctor in ten years - it’s time to lighten the load on the health care system and accept death as a natural part of life.

Fear is a disease in itself well worthwhile to overcome.
Don’t even get me started on our healthcare system. My wife and I just got a $6k medical bill for a portion of a necessary procedure she had done a year ago that the insurance company just decided wasn’t medically necessary. We’ve appealed twice now, and this is after the procedure was preapproved by them. It’s so bad.

This thread is going a lot of different directions. We could debate the health and economics of all this to no end.
I will say that most American’s spend more than they have. They buy new cars every few years have all the latest greatest toys etc... and live beyond their means. It really hits home in situations like this. I know many have a tough time getting by but also but I see way more of the later.
I am fortunate enough to have a job in the electric utility industry. No way we shut down unless it’s the apocalypse. I drive a 13 year old truck that was paid for decade ago that I maintain perfectly. We have at least two months food supply, a good generator, fuel, water, plenty of tp, and lots of ammo and arrows. We live in the country and can hunt and grow our own food. I can also build and fix anything needed myself. I am glad I grew up in a time when I was taught to do these things and live within my means.

City folks have no idea how to survive when things turn bad. Maybe this will be a wake up call for many...
Ok. So your post is filled with weird anecdotal statements about spending habits and city dwellers...ever leave the country side?

Cities are full of mechanical engineers, biologists, chemical engineers and all kinds of extremely apt and able-minded people who dont have to stretch much to learn to grow. That’s of course in the off chance that things do break down enough that we can’t move food around the country, of which there is no indication.
 

raph

Member
Messages
1,468
At least a portion of people calling for shutdowns are doing so out of malice for national economies. Despite reports in various anti-social and socialized media, there have been no pictures of overflowing hospital rooms with patients on ventilators in the press from any country, no photos of dead bodies stacked atop each other at "crematoriums running 24/7" related to this virus. All the celebrities claiming to have the virus are posting selfies of themselves isolating, not pictures of their lab test results.

Those who feel they are at risk should certainly isolate themselves, but even with low testing numbers it is clear only a small percentage of those who get the virus require any medical care at all. Companies staying open during this time are performing a valuable service and taking on a calculated risk in the face of statistics they can observe. If they are wrong about the safety of their employees, they know they will be held liable.
 

DrewH

Member
Messages
2,551
A pretty common mid range estimate for our current course is about 60% of the US population will catch the virus. That comes out to 196,200,000 people. Using your 380K infected to 400 deaths. The infection levels can expected to increase by a factor of 516. (196,200,000 / 380K). So multiply the 400 deaths times 516 and you are projecting 206,526 fatalities. That strikes me as a lot of people. And that is based on your numbers. Based on some mortality data, numbers over a million are more likely.
206,526 seems like a big number. Then compare it to the estimated 650,000 cancer deaths in the US this year.
 

LJOHNS

Member
Messages
783
Don’t even get me started on our healthcare system. My wife and I just got a $6k medical bill for a portion of a necessary procedure she had done a year ago that the insurance company just decided wasn’t medically necessary. We’ve appealed twice now, and this is after the procedure was preapproved by them. It’s so bad.


Ok. So your post is filled with weird anecdotal statements about spending habits and city dwellers...ever leave the country side?

Cities are full of mechanical engineers, biologists, chemical engineers and all kinds of extremely apt and able-minded people who dont have to stretch much to learn to grow. That’s of course in the off chance that things do break down enough that we can’t move food around the country, of which there is no indication.
Sure, plenty of anecdotal statements - like every one else on here. I get out plenty. I am also an engineer. It is a fact that way too many people are in debt up to eyeballs and have little to no savings.
 

hunter

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,732
206,526 seems like a big number. Then compare it to the estimated 650,000 cancer deaths in the US this year.
Talked to this earlier. People always die and from a lot of causes. This is a new one. That cancer number is a big number too. But it doesn't change the significance of the virus numbers. And real world, the 206,000 is quite a bit lower than many predictions.
 

eoengineer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,149
Companies staying open during this time are performing a valuable service and taking on a calculated risk in the face of statistics they can observe. If they are wrong about the safety of their employees, they know they will be held liable.
This is where the rubber meets the road. That’s the question. How will Gibson treat employees if they do contract the virus at work? Could it even be proven that’s where they picked it up? Who knows. Regardless, there may be lasting impact on those who survive https://health.clevelandclinic.org/heres-the-damage-coronavirus-covid-19-can-do-to-your-lungs/.

Sure, plenty of anecdotal statements - like every one else on here. I get out plenty. I am also an engineer. It is a fact that way too many people are in debt up to eyeballs and have little to no savings.
That is a fact, but it’s one thing to say lots of people are overextended, and another to say they are overextended because they are blowing their money on avocado toast.
 

raph

Member
Messages
1,468
How will Gibson treat employees if they do contract the virus at work? Could it even be proven that’s where they picked it up?
Probably treated like a workplace injury. Proven? The same ways it is proven health care workers contracted it on their job: tracing, community statistics, and risk assessments.
 

daacrusher2001

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,942
I just cleaned out the garage and am sorting out my fly fishing gear for a trip next weekend. No better self isolation than a trout stream in the beautiful mountains of WV!
Or Northwest NJ...I'm doing the same thing, hope to catch a few rainbows.
 

FiestaRed

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
21,422
This is where the rubber meets the road. That’s the question. How will Gibson treat employees if they do contract the virus at work? Could it even be proven that’s where they picked it up? Who knows. Regardless, there may be lasting impact on those who survive https://health.clevelandclinic.org/heres-the-damage-coronavirus-covid-19-can-do-to-your-lungs/.
Oh stop. ARDS can be brought about by almost any debilitating illness or injury. I see it all the time in patients. This is just cherry picking something that already exists and tying it to the current health issue.
 

funkapus

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
299
The CDC and WHO both have stated that heat and warm temperatures will probably stop the onslaught of this pandemic.
I don't know about WHO; but the CDC has gone out of their way to *not* say that. High heat is a way to kill the virus, as is true for most viruses and bacteria. However, that's not the same thing as warmth slowing the spread or making it less contagious. The CDC says "It is not yet known whether weather and temperature impact the spread of COVID-19". The epidemiological community agrees that the answer is not yet known.
 

tnt365

Member
Messages
3,044
Things that make me feel better:

-Population is less dense in most of US, may slow spread.
-Vaccines, treatments, and tests are being worked on an improved, backed by a lot of support and resources.
-It isn’t super deadly for most people.

Things that make me feel worse:

-14 day incubation means it will spread silently
-There are reports that if it reaches your lungs it feels like hot needles stabbing your lungs
-Something like 85% of Americans couldn’t afford a $1000 emergency before this, now they face unemployment and shortages. This will keep people spreading the disease.
-America’s budget has been underfunded, safety nets stressed and cut, increased spending in interest on debt, military, government pensions, healthcare costs etc. that put us in a poor position to incentivize Americans to not work.
-In general, we are a reactive Country, not a proactive one. We will not try to prevent people getting sick by shutting down, we will react to people getting sick and then shut down.
-Not enough ICU or ventilators, masks, etc. Our healthcare system was not prepared for this.
-640,000 Americans bankrupt every year bc of medical bills. I bet some multiple of that number put off going to the doctor bc of cost, even those with insurance bc of high copays and deductibles. Many people who contract in US won’t even go into the hospital, making both spread and death rates higher.
-The fed and gov are mostly supporting demand side but shutdowns will cause a supply problem. I’d like to see more talk of how we maintain supply.
-A vaccine is 1-3 years away by most estimates. Proving treatments and mass producing them may take months or even a year. We can’t even keep toilet paper stocked.
-I only have a few rolls left and a hankering for Taco Bell! :confused:
 

eoengineer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,149
Oh stop. ARDS can be brought about by almost any debilitating illness or injury. I see it all the time in patients. This is just cherry picking something that already exists and tying it to the current health issue.
You believe what you would like, I’m not really interested in changing anyone’s opinion. I will follow the what scientists and experts say.

Sample sizes are small and data is limited regarding the lasting physical impact on people, but it’s something to keep an eye on.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bu...tion-gasping-air-hong-kong-doctors-2020-3?amp
 
Status
Not open for further replies.




Trending Topics

Top