Gibson Forcing Workers To Work During Co-Vid19

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conanb

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At least a portion of people calling for shutdowns are doing so out of malice for national economies. Despite reports in various anti-social and socialized media, there have been no pictures of overflowing hospital rooms with patients on ventilators in the press from any country, no photos of dead bodies stacked atop each other at "crematoriums running 24/7" related to this virus. All the celebrities claiming to have the virus are posting selfies of themselves isolating, not pictures of their lab test results.

Those who feel they are at risk should certainly isolate themselves, but even with low testing numbers it is clear only a small percentage of those who get the virus require any medical care at all. Companies staying open during this time are performing a valuable service and taking on a calculated risk in the face of statistics they can observe. If they are wrong about the safety of their employees, they know they will be held liable.
There has been plenty of photos and reports from Spain and Italy of overflowing hospitals and multiple truckloads of coffins. You're obviously not looking
 

Miroslav L

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Yes the world has changed. But much of it *may* end up being an overreaction that tanks the economy. Or it might end up being the best approach... I don't know and the world/country will not know for some time.

But think a few layers deeper into what you dismiss as "the economy". Shutting down every business except for essential servercies more than likely will cause not just a recession but a depression as serious as or worse than The Depression. Have you thought about the suciide rate during recessions and The Depression? Probably not... a depression *could* result in more deaths than this virus. Especially if it lasts approx a decade like The Depression. There has never been a sucide rate like The Depression.

I'm an accountant for a large aerospace company. Basically overnight our household name customers cut their forecasted orders by 50%. Brother... it is now layoff time in my company. How do I know? I'm a senior accountant that received a memo from our CFO for just that. And we are only about 3 weeks into the exponential changes. Right now 1 in 5 in this thread will be laid off.

I suggest you get your head around this...
I agree.

The reaction and responses to the virus may end up being 10x worse than the virus.
 

funkapus

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Yeah, and misinformation is NOT helpful. Case in point:

You have to be careful about this. First, concerning COVID-19, what you really care about is adult critical care capacity; about 30% of U.S. critical care beds are neo-natal and pediatric critical care beds, which are not relevant. Mind, of course some percentage of the beds in other countries fall into that category too.

The more important issue is the question of what percentage of these critical care beds are *available*. Before the rise of COVID-19, the U.S. and most other countries have differred strongly in the degree of occupancy of their critical care facilities. The national average occupancy for critical care beds in the U.S. is normally about 2/3, with levels of up to 90% in many areas. This isn't surprising; having excess critical care capacity cuts into profits. This is in contrast with other countries that do not have the same health care model, and therefore do not see excess capacity as a negative. As for hospital beds overall, they're pretty comparable, with Italy having slightly more per capita; although again, availability has to be considered.
 
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You have to be careful about this. First, concerning COVID-19, what you really care about is adult critical care capacity; about 30% of U.S. critical care beds are neo-natal and pediatric critical care beds, which are not relevant. Mind, of course some percentage of the beds in other countries fall into that category too.

The more important issue is the question of what percentage of these critical care beds are *available*. Before the rise of COVID-19, the U.S. and most other countries have differred strongly in the degree of occupancy of their critical care facilities. The national average occupancy for critical care beds in the U.S. is normally about 2/3, with levels of up to 90% in many areas. This isn't surprising; having excess critical care capacity cuts into profits. This is in contrast with other countries that do not have the same health care model, and therefore do not see excess capacity as a negative. As for hospital beds overall, they're pretty comparable, with Italy having slightly more per capita; although again, availability has to be considered.
Does the "bed number" take into account the staff with training needed to treat patients as well? I'm seeing / hearing a lot of reports of burnout in medical staff already (much of whom is 50+) due not only the stress of the actual work, but trying to manage the logistics of child care / schooling, grocery shopping on limited hours, meal prep etc. in an environment where they had been required to take mandatory overtime long before the virus. I seriously worry about these people.
 

eoengineer

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You have to be careful about this. First, concerning COVID-19, what you really care about is adult critical care capacity; about 30% of U.S. critical care beds are neo-natal and pediatric critical care beds, which are not relevant. Mind, of course some percentage of the beds in other countries fall into that category too.

The more important issue is the question of what percentage of these critical care beds are *available*. Before the rise of COVID-19, the U.S. and most other countries have differred strongly in the degree of occupancy of their critical care facilities. The national average occupancy for critical care beds in the U.S. is normally about 2/3, with levels of up to 90% in many areas. This isn't surprising; having excess critical care capacity cuts into profits. This is in contrast with other countries that do not have the same health care model, and therefore do not see excess capacity as a negative. As for hospital beds overall, they're pretty comparable, with Italy having slightly more per capita; although again, availability has to be considered.
Thank you for making the effort to provide sources. It helps, and is appreciated.
 

Stinky Kitty

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Slightly off topic but if this virus has taught me anything, it's this much...


...I'll no longer mock those friends of mine who are preppers. :tapedshut I'm not ready to start digging underground but there was wisdom in at least having six months of rice, TP, oatmeal, water available. People panic and the herd mentality follows and while it's nonsensical to think an entire metropolitan area is suddenly going to start using more tissue than they normally use in a two-week period, people see videos of the hoarders and the frightened follow suit. The preppers are sitting back patting each other on the back....as they should. Moving forward, I think the way we Americans live our lives will change to some degree....or maybe not. I live in south Florida and when the first hurricane of the season is named, Publix becomes a circus. It's not a great mystery when is hurricane season and yet most of the people down here plan for nothing. Is it any wonder the virus has completely upended their lives.
 

timbuck2

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24 HR FITNESS is closed here in colorado yet anytime fitness can and does remain open..why? Poor decision on 24 hr. Its a minor flu and less have died then the typical flu= overblown hype. So if you dont have to shutdown why should you?
 

LJOHNS

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Slightly off topic but if this virus has taught me anything, it's this much...


...I'll no longer mock those friends of mine who are preppers. :tapedshut I'm not ready to start digging underground but there was wisdom in at least having six months of rice, TP, oatmeal, water available. People panic and the herd mentality follows and while it's nonsensical to think an entire metropolitan area is suddenly going to start using more tissue than they normally use in a two-week period, people see videos of the hoarders and the frightened follow suit. The preppers are sitting back patting each other on the back....as they should. Moving forward, I think the way we Americans live our lives will change to some degree....or maybe not. I live in south Florida and when the first hurricane of the season is named, Publix becomes a circus. It's not a great mystery when is hurricane season and yet most of the people down here plan for nothing. Is it any wonder the virus has completely upended their lives.
I agree. If more people were prepared and had emergency supplies on hand we would not have had the circus we have seen in the past couple weeks at the stores. I figure half of this county is full of idiots with low education and no common sense. Add this to my previous statements that people are too far in debt and have no savings and it becomes a perfect storm.

I don’t have a bunker and am not a full blown prepper but me and my family are prepared.
 
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FiestaRed

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21,422
You believe what you would like, I’m not really interested in changing anyone’s opinion. I will follow the what scientists and experts say.

Sample sizes are small and data is limited regarding the lasting physical impact on people, but it’s something to keep an eye on.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.businessinsider.com/coronavirus-recovery-damage-lung-function-gasping-air-hong-kong-doctors-2020-3?amp
I know that ARDS exists. I've seen it first hand repeatedly. And I know it can be linked to the virus. I took biology, anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, etc. It is science. But to pick that particular sequelae out of the air and hold it up as a potential deadly consequence of this particular virus when it can be a deadly consequence of so many things out there is simply irresponsible and sensationalistic. It can be possible to acquire ARDS from a finger cut, or a bladder infection if either goes septic. Any infection can lead to ARDS.

Just stop.
 

larry1096

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Not according to the WHO. Just goes to show, it depends on who picks the numbers and how they are compared. I think WHO has a much better handle on evaluating factors that make a health care system work.

BTW, Italy ranked 2nd. US ranked 37th. Behind Dominica and Costa Rica.
Look at the categories the two organizations use to score healthcare systems; the one I supplied is strictly based on performance, while the WHO grades largely on the 'fairness of financing healthcare'; the WHO has an agenda, and pushes it via their scoring.

The first more accurately reflects the actual capability of a system, IMHO.


Larry
 

Route67

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Haven’t seen a doctor in ten years? Hell, you’re part of the problem. You’ll end up going because something is hobbling you and find out that it’s untreatable because it’s too late. Now the taxpayers are paying for a bunch of futile tests and procedures to lengthen your life out by a few painful months. The whole time all you had to do was have normal checkups.
My former doctor was fastidious about regular checkups and he was very thorough about it - shortly after my last checkup with him he died of a massive heart attack at the age of 56 - he had a huge work load and his death may have been stress related.
 
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Gibson's biggest value/asset: The name "Gibson."

Gibson credit holders KKR annual revenue: 1.9 Billion dollars

Gibson Guitar Plant: 300 employees, mostly blue-collar hourly pay

Davidson County, Nashville, confirmed COVID-19 Cases: 167 & growing fast




TGP: Will someone please think about the jaabs!!!!!!!!! Gibson will go bankrupt!!! 65+ UPVOTES & Counting

Never disappointing when the brain trust comes out to fake pragmatic reasoning. If any factory can close in America right now and sustain long term...Gibson can.

Top post I stole from reddit: "Quarantine Authentic"
 
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