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Gibson Going Heavy? Might Be A Great Business Move

Messages
105
Hi all,

Today I published what I think is a fairly even minded take on the idea that Gibson is leaning a bit more into metal than they really ever have previously, and how this could be a hugely successful business venture (and PR venture) for them. I'm curious if you all think similarly? Do you think they'll still just be the brand for Blues Lawyers, will this help them catch up to the mainstream popularity of Fender or Music Man?

Link: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/art...mbracing_the_metal_side_be_a_good_move-117785
 

sahhas

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
17,111
time to bring back the MIII:


they can easily take their models: Explorer, V and turn them into Metal machines....not sure why they never did it.
and take the Moderne and put a FR on it...and away they go....

always thought the MIII was a cool guitar!!!
 

AndyMander82

Member
Messages
222
The recent Epiphone Prophecy series are aimed directly at metal and appear to be doing really well but with a higher price point that a usually Epiphone. Would be interesting to see if Gibson will turn their eyes on these and produce a higher spec or USA version. Or they may be the first high end line of Epiphones
 
Messages
105
The recent Epiphone Prophecy series are aimed directly at metal and appear to be doing really well but with a higher price point that a usually Epiphone. Would be interesting to see if Gibson will turn their eyes on these and produce a higher spec or USA version. Or they may be the first high end line of Epiphones
I feel like this is definitely in the works already right? Especially with how well they have allegedly sold
 

sahhas

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
17,111
the Gibson MIII was very short lived and came out at the tail end of hair metal and right before Grunge....i remember seeing a few ads for them, don't think i ever saw one in person.

I've honestly never seen that guitar before and I'm so intrigued...
 

JorisBlack

Member
Messages
219
Hi all,

Today I published what I think is a fairly even minded take on the idea that Gibson is leaning a bit more into metal than they really ever have previously, and how this could be a hugely successful business venture (and PR venture) for them. I'm curious if you all think similarly? Do you think they'll still just be the brand for Blues Lawyers, will this help them catch up to the mainstream popularity of Fender or Music Man?

Link: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/art...mbracing_the_metal_side_be_a_good_move-117785
Not sure why you mention Music Man there, to be honest. They're not mainstream, although I guess you're thinking of Petrucci and Jason Richardson...

Gibson for me has always been associated with heavier genres (besides blues and rock of course).
Metallica, Mastodon, Tool, Tony Iommi, Randy Rhoads... just to name a few.

But, interestingly, Gibson 'lost' many of those artists at some point. The Metallica guys went to ESP (and other brands), the Mastodon guys were also diverging to ESP and First Act etc, Randy Rhoads went with Jackson.

So yes, it makes total sense that they invest some more time and money in metal oriented guitars and artists. A Les Paul, Explorer, Flying V, SG, those can be serious metal machines. But, they should probably also look towards younger artists as well. Slash, Dave Mustaine, sure, they're great guitarists with impressive careers, but is the younger generation still idolizing them?
 

Bill Dennis

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
409
Hi all,

Today I published what I think is a fairly even minded take on the idea that Gibson is leaning a bit more into metal than they really ever have previously, and how this could be a hugely successful business venture (and PR venture) for them. I'm curious if you all think similarly? Do you think they'll still just be the brand for Blues Lawyers, will this help them catch up to the mainstream popularity of Fender or Music Man?

Link: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/art...mbracing_the_metal_side_be_a_good_move-117785
I think the biggest names in guitar (especially with younger players) are in the heavier genres. It makes sense to target them but if they try to do it with 8K sig models they won't be terribly successful.

Denny
 

JorisBlack

Member
Messages
219
Not just in metal, but a lot of players that start out as Gibson users end up having a sig model made by somebody else that somewhat tries to recreate whatever Gibson they were playing.
Exactly my observation too, and I wonder why. Maybe Gibson isn't taking care of them enough to keep them loyal, if you will. That's where Music Man is really different from most other brands, if you ask me. Any player who has a signature EBMM seems to stick with it for most of their career, and it's also because EBMM is giving them the opportunities to change the model every few years (excellent example is Petrucci, whose sig models have kept evolving continuously).

Maybe Gibson is stuck in the past and its heritage too much ("play authentic" nonsense), and it's why they have problems coming up with new succesful models. It could be a different story if they had a very popular player behind a (truly) new model.
 

weedzzz

Member
Messages
321
One thing I’ve never understood about Gibson is why they have never had a line of guitars coming out of other countries, so people can get a cheaper guitar but still Gibson. Obviously people can say you can get an Epiphone, but there’s quite a big middle ground to be filled between an Epiphone and Gibson price point, generally speaking.

of course, it might take away from Gibson’s being USA made guitars, but I don’t think it’s done Fender or PRS any harm having more affordable imports. Squier’s still sell great too, despite there being affordable Fenders, so I guess Epiphone wouldn’t suffer, especially with Epiphone having its own guitars such as Casino.

I guess it’s cool they stuck to their guns on being USA made, but just from a business perspective, it’s interesting they never went down that route as of yet.
 

R. B.

Member
Messages
110
Hi all,

Today I published what I think is a fairly even minded take on the idea that Gibson is leaning a bit more into metal than they really ever have previously, and how this could be a hugely successful business venture (and PR venture) for them. I'm curious if you all think similarly? Do you think they'll still just be the brand for Blues Lawyers, will this help them catch up to the mainstream popularity of Fender or Music Man?

Link: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/art...mbracing_the_metal_side_be_a_good_move-117785
Thanks for sharing your article. This is an interesting theory.

But what I don't see is enough material evidence to support the proposition that Gibson are moving in a metal direction.

1. To describe Mesa Boogie amps as metal amps is reductionist. True that Mesa are we'll known for their high gain amps, but if you look at their catalogue, they produce a diverse range of amplifiers. Mesa is not exclusively a metal brand.

2. Gibson have released 3 Dave Mustaine signature guitars. This is a really small percentage of their catalogue as a whole.

3. Take a look at the Gibson website now - there's nothing about metal on there.

So perhaps they are moving in a more metal direction, but it's a slow move if so and there is not yet a compelling amount of evidence to support this.

And are Gibson a blues lawyer brand? I feel like this is an unnecessary accusation.
 




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