Gibson price increase

webcat

Member
Messages
920
Epi's are nice guitars but not Gibson quality at all.

I have a 2011 Gibson (custom shop), 2013 and 2020 standard LPs, and a J15 acoustic.

I also have two brand new Epiphones, a Goldtop LP purchased about 4 years ago, and I had a Joe Perry signature LP purchased whenever the Boneyard came out, early 2000s I think.

So I’ve got a decent representation of both brands spanning over a decade. And I can confidently say that your assessment is correct.
 

Silverback

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
742
Les Pauls are as expensive as they were back in the 50s, when you adjust for inflation.

For the benefit of @joesatch who is apparently in the mood to laugh at posts and not contribute himself, a Les Paul in 1959 sold for around $375. In today's money, that's over $3,600.

I was referring to the current planned price hike. In the face of a fragile economy combined with unparalleled inflation.

The 50's were a booming economy in the US, so I see a little difference in your flat math.

There are other factors to consider other than the basic conversion charts.

Filled up your tank lately, have a family, how's that grocery bill?
 

seward

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,874
So I talked to a dealer I trust. I'm putting in a M2M that I've always wanted because what I want is going up a bit and I'd like to beat the increase. But that said, the dealer told me that the price increase is not across the board and, in some cases, prices will come down. Couldn't say more and I don't know what the latter means. I guess wait and see?

The LP Special Tributes, humbucker or p90, are still $999, same as before the first price hike, and (still) excellent guitars for the money.
 

webcat

Member
Messages
920
I was referring to the current planned price hike. In the face of a fragile economy combined with unparalleled inflation.

The 50's were a booming economy in the US, so I see a little difference in your flat math.

There are other factors to consider other than the basic conversion charts.

Filled up your tank lately, have a family, how's that grocery bill?

1. I mentioned the 50s only because it’s a long time ago. The maths holds up pretty much whenever, so you’re splitting hairs.

2. With the current price hike, they’re still only marginally more than they were before the 2019 drop

3. The economic conditions are probably the reason Gibson is increasing prices, same as most other businesses are doing it. It may have been withheld from you so I’ll let you in on a secret - Gibson has to pay a lot of bills. The lights and heating aren’t free. The higher gas prices means Gibson now pays more for the importing of its raw materials and deliveries. The entire supply chain now costs more money. All those prices you’re feeling, businesses feel too. Depending on what their profit margins are, they may not have the room to absorb it.
 

Xonim

Member
Messages
50
The LP Special Tributes, humbucker or p90, are still $999, same as before the first price hike, and (still) excellent guitars for the money.

I think the Special Tributes are fantastic guitars - I picked up one of the P90s a few months ago, and played a humbucker version in the shop shortly after getting mine ... I don't have anything really bad to say about them. They're light and comfortable and sound like a Les Paul.

The only negatives as far as I'm concerned are visual things. Mine has some imperfections on the fingerboard - almost like it was scraped across the grain at some point in a couple different places. Definitely didn't come from me, might be the factory or maybe the piece of wood was just weird. I dunno. The maple neck with the cherry satin finish means the back of the neck looks pink-ish rather than cherry. And you can't put the poker chip on because the cheaper switch they use has a shorter shaft and doesn't have enough clearance. But to save $1700 off the price of a standard? I'm okay with those compromises because I can't truly afford, nor can my playing justify $2500+ for a new Standard, even if I want a gold top someday...
 

SDR

Member
Messages
609
Jobs are still very plentiful and pay rising in many sectors, as business struggles to keep staffed. So this inflationary spiral at the moment a lot different than the 1978-1982 period.

Guitars gonna keep rising until the economy hits a brick wall. Which could still be a year out (or more)
 
Messages
147
Les Pauls are as expensive as they were back in the 50s, when you adjust for inflation.

For the benefit of @joesatch who is apparently in the mood to laugh at posts and not contribute himself, a Les Paul in 1959 sold for around $375. In today's money, that's over $3,600.

Though this isn’t a completely wrong point, it doesn’t consider scale of economy and that a Les Paul is exponentially easier to manufacture in the 21st century than it was in the 1950’s. I would be curious to see how material costs compare then vs. now
 

peskypesky

Member
Messages
6,327
Though this isn’t a completely wrong point, it doesn’t consider scale of economy and that a Les Paul is exponentially easier to manufacture in the 21st century than it was in the 1950’s. I would be curious to see how material costs compare then vs. now

Exponentially easier to manufacture? How so?
 

webcat

Member
Messages
920
Though this isn’t a completely wrong point, it doesn’t consider scale of economy and that a Les Paul is exponentially easier to manufacture in the 21st century than it was in the 1950’s. I would be curious to see how material costs compare then vs. now

Interesting point, although you could also argue Gibson, being a far larger company now with far more expensive machinery, marketing etc has much bigger overheads - profit margin is ultimately what matters. Nonetheless the original claim was that Gibson is making them more expensive, which is evidently not true - a Standard is in the region of $1,000 cheaper than in 1959, and the pricing has held largely consistent for those 70 years.
 




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