Gibson True Historic 1959 v.s Original 1959

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Ren007, Feb 19, 2018.

  1. 2HBStrat

    2HBStrat Member

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    Maybe so.....I seem to recall reading about Rick Nielson selling a Les Paul back in those days for $450....not sure....maybe to Joe Walsh?
     
  2. 27sauce

    27sauce Member

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    About 10 years ago someone found a burst in a pawn shop in Louisiana for around $700

    Joe Perry got one for free not too long ago.
     
  3. sws1

    sws1 Member

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    This is what...the 4th thread on this very topic in the last month?

    No matter how many times owners of these guitars say they are different, non-owners will explain it away as nostalgia.
    Owners disagree.
    Non-owners say they're just trying to protect their investment.
    Some will suggest non-owners are jealous.

    Round and round we go. Wheeeeeeeeee
     
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  4. 2HBStrat

    2HBStrat Member

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    Awesome!
     
  5. Dr. Tweedbucket

    Dr. Tweedbucket Deluxe model available !!!11

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    I had a killer sounding R8 ... nice fat beefy mids. My brother has an original 58 LP Custom 3 pup BB. We compared and I thought the R8 held it's own until he switched on the middle pup. That guitar could sound almost like a strat! It was amazing. Still, I thought the R8 held up quite well.

    Ok, back to your R9 vs R9 thread. :red
     
    Cotton likes this.
  6. korus

    korus Member

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    Middle postion on 3 pickup Custom is bridge and middle in parallel, EXACTLY like b+m on Strat. It is obviously thinner than n+b.
     
  7. Strat

    Strat Supporting Member

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    Correction needed: It was Joe Walsh who had Virgil Lay shave the neck down to more approximate his '60 thinner neck profile. He still didn't like it and gave it to Page later. See Lays Guitar shop history.
     
  8. captwillard

    captwillard Member

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    I know that, but they weren't without perceived flaws back then by some legendary players. If you have a real 59 and it wasn't upgraded to grovers, you should have an inferior instrument.
     
  9. 27sauce

    27sauce Member

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    What about a ‘68 Custom?

    Those should be pretty close to a burst, right?

    Anyone ever compared those two?
     
  10. fjrabon

    fjrabon Member

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    As was mentioned earlier, this was about page’s #2, which Page himself had shaved down because he was used to the neck on his #1.
     
  11. Papanate

    Papanate Member

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    This is correct. Walsh talked to Guitar World back in the day about what he had done
    to the 1959 Les Paul. He took the guitar to Virgil Lay - Lays Guitars in Akron Ohio.
    He had Virgil shave the neck of that Les Paul - as Walsh didn't like the 'fat' neck
    the Les Paul came stock with. In the process he also refinished the neck (not the entire
    guitar as people kept repeating).

    I know personally that Lay was the tech to hit up in the midwest. If you toured in the late 70s
    the local roadies in Ohio and Kentucky would talk about him.
     
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  12. Papanate

    Papanate Member

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    According to Joe Walsh he charged Page what it cost to fly the guitar from
    Ohio to the Fillmore west in San Francisco - not what the value of the guitar
    was at the time.

    And while I have no idea what late 50s LPs were worth in 1970 - I can speak
    to what I could buy them for in 1977 - 1980. And generally that was about $300
    - $600. Now I know that if one went to some fancy pants store like Normans
    he was asking stupid prices - probably $1500 - $2500. Thankfully the internet
    didn't exist then - so the average guy in the midwest only had what they paid
    for the guitar as a reference - and what people were selling the Norlin Les Pauls
    for new and used. For example I picked up a 1958 Black Beauty in 1979 for
    $450 - because a new Les Paul Deluxe Black Beauty was $725 in 1979. I couldn't
    afford the new one...which I really wanted. Our manager ran across a older
    guy who mentioned it to him - and he made me buy that one - instead of the
    new one on payments.
     
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  13. The EQ

    The EQ Supporting Member

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    I am a HUGE fan of the 2015-2016 Gibson CS True Historics. I own a '60 TH and now this amazing new "dirty lemon" '59 TH LP. Stunning. Light. Amazing neck carve. Sounds like an untamed beast burst. There will be some tonal skulduggery going on at my home studio this weekend and for a long time. FYI - I played a new 2019 R9 at GC last week and it felt nothing like the True Historic. Bad neck carve, frets did not feel good, sticky back of the neck, aniline dye too dark, RW board too light in color, etc. Sounded like a dead war club. Go TH and do not look back!!
     
  14. Bluplirst

    Bluplirst Supporting Member

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    Luck of the draw and TH marketing ploy aside, whatever helps you sleep at night!
     
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  15. rburkard

    rburkard Gold Supporting Member

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    I had and still have some True Historics Les Pauls. They vary like real fifties Les Pauls. Workmanship is nice and the pickups, especially the ones build for Wildwood are real close to the real deal. However old wood and natural decaying pickup magnets strength are difficult to come by in new instruments. That’s the main difference.
     
  16. The EQ

    The EQ Supporting Member

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    True. I believe these are the best that the Custom Shop offered. As close to the real deal as you can get. I have owned many LPs and that is my hands on opinion. My vintage ES 335 cannot be beat and that is due, in part, to the aged wood and magnets. Like butter.
     
  17. The EQ

    The EQ Supporting Member

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    Bottom line: I have owned tons of LPs over many years. The True Historics get the closest to how they were made "back in the glory days." This is just fact. No BS.
     
  18. sws1

    sws1 Member

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    That is in fact true. But it's also true that the originals still sound different (often...maybe not always as I haven't played all of them.)
     
  19. C-4

    C-4 Member

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    Every single guitar of the same model will naturally vary one-to-the-next.

    The wood on original bursts is not the same exact type as on the new Historics. Old growth mahogany does sound different, yet even that wood varies guitar-to-guitar. Not all bursts are Holy Grail instruments.

    Next is the pickups on each guitar, and the thickness and chemical makeup of the finish. They vary naturally as well.

    However, I believe that one of the most overlooked aspects possibly is time. As the guitar ages, and it's parts along with it, chemical and natural changes occur which can possibly affect the sound of an instrument made of wood.

    I have 3 CS LP's, 2 of which are very recent R9's.
    One R9 sounds like a Tele on steroids, and the other has a vintage sound to it which is throatier, and slightly fuller. From a live recording I heard recently, which someone made, the fuller sounding R9 has a far more vintage sound to it, that we hear on old bursts. It's not exactly the same, but it caught my attention when I heard the recording enough for me to feel that the guitar has an "older" sound to it, for lack of a better term.
     

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