Gibsons and tuning, issues...

Russ73

Member
Messages
1,176
Am I not doing something right? I have a 2016 Gibson Les Paul Jr and it wont stay in tune for more than half a song, do I need more wrapping on the tuners? I literally turn the tuners and there is no pitch difference then it jumps like 2 octaves, before I dump it are there any tricks I don't know about, also I tried nut sauce already and it didn't do squat, love the look of the guitar and I want a Paul in my collection but its virtually unplayable at this point...thx for any suggestions...
 

Michael Hunter

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,893
Yup. It's the nut. Nut sauce or other lubricants can help, but if the slot is cut too tightly or at the wrong angle you'll still have issues. Not sure if they're still using Corian for their nut material, but if they are it would be worth the expense to have a bone nut cut instead.
 

tenchijin2

Member
Messages
3,031
Binding in the nut. The string is sticking in the nut. Put some graphite lube or similar into each slot, see if that doesn't help. Remember to stretch your strings firmly after you put them on to increase stability.
 

ED_P

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,092
A quick solution if you don't have a tube of graphite lube is to move the string aside at the nut, and run a pencil back and forth so graphite crumbs fall into the slot. I've been doing this for years after reading as a kid Eddie Van Halen did it before he had locking trems, and it does work.
 

JPIndustrie

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,357
Yep nut issues. Probably all 6 slots could be stand to be looked at, very common with these guitars. Once everything is filed properly it'll stay in tune. I think nut dressing is one of the places Gibson saves $$$ while custom shop guitars are plekked (another set of cost savings there too).
 

Brian N

Member
Messages
1,724
This is 100% exactly the description of a binding nut. Loosen the strings, put some graphite in the nut slots (or big bends nut sauce), and your problem will be solved. You'll have to add lubrication of this sort every time you change the strings.
 

Russ73

Member
Messages
1,176
Its happening on all of the strings but mostly the G B and E strings, I guess I should bring it to the music zoo near me and have Pete the tech take a look at it, its frustrating as hell. bend the G string it it drops 2 octaves...damn....
 

Michael Hunter

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,893
Its happening on all of the strings but mostly the G B and E strings, I guess I should bring it to the music zoo near me and have Pete the tech take a look at it, its frustrating as hell. bend the G string it it drops 2 octaves...damn....
This is your best bet. Lubricating the slots, even if done every time you change strings, is just a band aid if the slots aren't cut correctly to begin with.
 

Chris6870

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,700
I have a 2016 Les Paul and I have the intonation nearly perfect, set as close as I can get. When I play an open G its perfectly in tune,play a d major its off. Tune so the D major sounds good,open chords are out. Its maddening. I love the guitar but don't understand how this happens on a $2k+ guitar. I'm taking it to get checked out,if it can't be solved it will go back. Sucks because I love t.
 

klatuu

Member
Messages
2,449
I have a 2016 Les Paul and I have the intonation nearly perfect, set as close as I can get. When I play an open G its perfectly in tune,play a d major its off. Tune so the D major sounds good,open chords are out. Its maddening. I love the guitar but don't understand how this happens on a $2k+ guitar. I'm taking it to get checked out,if it can't be solved it will go back. Sucks because I love t.
Is the nut cut too high? If so, when you press the strings down in a chord, the string deflection will adversely affect the pitch
 

Tidewater Custom Shop

Performance Enhancing Guitarworks
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,692
This is your best bet. Lubricating the slots, even if done every time you change strings, is just a band aid if the slots aren't cut correctly to begin with.
I couldn't agree more. An authorized Gibson dealer will probably view this as a warranty issue and shouldn't cost a dime for them to rectify your claim. Even if you have to pay (as in there's no authorized Gibson dealer nearby), the cost will soon be forgotten as you get some unburdened play time with your new Gibson.
 




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