Gibsons Digital Guitar Demo...

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by gassyndrome, Aug 21, 2006.

  1. gassyndrome

    gassyndrome Member

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    Quite intriguing - I didnt really understand how this was gonna work, but after seeing this demo I can understand theres some merit to it. :AOK

    Any of you sound manglers out there interested in this? Hearing your experiments in 5.1 could be something different!
    :dude

    I understand you've been able to do something similiar with Roland stuff for sometime, but horses for courses and all that :)

    http://www.gearwire.com/mov/Gibson_HD6X_Pro.mov
     
  2. JamonGrande

    JamonGrande Supporting Member

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    i think there's a lot of potential left for hexaphonic processing. still, i think there is too much of a divide between "traditional" electric guitar and this kind of electric guitar. so much that i doubt gibson will get it to a reasonable price.

    gibson would either need to develop processors and amps specifically for the MAGIC system AND get thrid party developers on board also. and personally, i don't think i would trust a CAT5 cable in a high use situation in terms of durability.

    don't want to be a hater, so i hope it does lead to something unique

    joe
     
  3. indytruckboy

    indytruckboy Member

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    Seems like an expermentalists dream. It is pretty cool. Id like to mess with it for awhile. But I think its to fancy for my needs. With all that tech. in there, it must cost more than a new compact car.
     
  4. Mrgearguy

    Mrgearguy Member

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    You would think with all that Gibson has done recently after waking up to the fact that guitarists don't want a re-invented wheel, that they would be the last to try to re-invent the wheel.

    There have been a bunch of guitars that did this sort of thing: Shadow, Roland, etc. etc. Interesting for sure... for about 10 minutes, then let me plug straight into a Marshall and rip.
     
  5. daddyo

    daddyo Guest

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    Gibson has got its work cut out for it if it wants to muscle out Godin and Roland. You can get a Godin xtSA and Roland GR 20 for under $1600. Can't imagine Gibson could come within $4k of that,
     
  6. fast ricky love

    fast ricky love Supporting Member

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    I give Gibson credit for exploring what else is possible. You never know what it could lead to. But that seems pretty gimmicky to me... I'm with what Mrgearguy said!
     
  7. Unburst

    Unburst Member

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    Serously underwhelmed, hex pups have been available since the 70's, the only thing new Gibson have done is put the A/D onboard.
    The Roland VG-8 was doing this kind of thing years ago and went a lot further by adding pup modelling and amp modelling so it could still sound like a regular guitar.

    The problem is that hex pups sound pretty bad and pick up the string vibration in a weird place, sonically.

    He made that Les Paul sound like the cheapest acoustic you could buy.
    A better option is the Ghost piezo system which would give you the same hex capabilities but far superior sound.
     
  8. Pete Galati

    Pete Galati Member

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    I liked some of what he was able to do with it. I kind of liked it when he used a different effect on each string, and the separate reverb, and chorus on each string.

    I don't see them breaking any new ground though, even if that's what they want people to think.

    Maybe someone who's been paying attention to guitar sythesizers can explain to me... what exactly is new here?
     
  9. Unburst

    Unburst Member

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    Nothing, all this technology has been available for years.

    What Gibson did, which IS new, is they made it sound really bad.
     
  10. Orren

    Orren Member

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    I've been watching this for years....since Gibson bought Opcode, then crushed and raped it in order to conscript their hardware engineers into working on the DOA "MagICS" guitar system Henry Jerkowicz was already squaking about. I say this to make sure everyone knows that I'm bitter, up front. ;)

    Now then:

    First is that this is in no way a guitar synthesizer. A "guitar synth" uses the pitch performed on a guitar to trigger a synthesizer (the original analog Roland and Ibanez units). A "MIDI controller guitar" or "MIDI guitar" is one that has a 13-pin output that connects to a converter unit that converts the pitch performed into MIDI data which can then trigger any MIDI synthesizer or computer-based software synthesizer.

    The Gibson device only sends audio. It doesn't do any conversion to MIDI, or otherwise trigger synthesizers.

    That said:

    In order to turn your standard issue six string into a MIDI guitar requires two basic components:
    1) A hex pickup (such as the roland GK-3) or piezo bridge system (such as RMC, Graph Tech Ghost, L. Baggs, etc). These pickups capture each string seperately, and keep the signal seperate.
    2) A 13-pin hexaphonic output to send those discreet signals down a cable to your converter box or guitar synth unit.

    So the idea of a seperate pickup per string is not new, nor is the idea of sending that information down a wire.

    The only real innovation here is that Gibson is sending digital data. This means that there is not only a hex pickup in that Les Paul, but A/D converters. It then sends the information via an Ethernet cable.

    But here's the deal killer:

    Now, if this system sent standard digital audio data, so that you could plug it into any digital audio interface and record a direct digital signal, this would probably be the ultimate guitar for people who use modelers. But no, you need to use Gibson's converter box, which has no digital outputs. So once again, before you can get the signal into a modeler, it has to go analog.

    So in the end, this system is a non-starter.
     
  11. daddyo

    daddyo Guest

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    If Gibson stops improvements or production, your stuck with Gibson proprietary technology. At least with a guitar with a hex pup/13 pin output, you can upgrade the synth unit as new ones come out. If you get sick of the whole synth trip, if you bought a quality guitar with a hex pup on it, toss the hex pup and you still have a decent guitar. Not so with guitars with gigantic route outs for onboard technology like Line 6 and Gibson Magic.
     
  12. JingleJungle

    JingleJungle Member

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    I am a tweaker.
    I'd love to play w/ that one.
    I would NOT be prepared to shell anything over $2k for it. The sound of the hex thingie IS underwhelming... and I do echo the thought that the CAT5 cable does not look reliable. I'll go the route of a normal breakout box and then do my tweaks from there. I personally wouldn't really need to have single digital feeds for each string.
    I am still a fan of the analog age :)

    JJ
     

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