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Glendale or not? Upgrades to '52 Reissue Telecaster

dehughes

Member
Messages
1,156
Hi all,

Many years ago I put a Glendale bridge plate and brass string saddles on my American Std. Tele and I noticed a positive difference. That Tele had the stock, late-'90s flat plate and individual saddles akin to a Strat.

I now have a '52 reissue Tele that has the stock "ash tray" bridge plate and brass barrel saddles (two strings per saddle), and am wondering if the bridge plate and saddles on these "nicer" Fender Teles are of equal quality as the Glendale equivalents. I ask because if the consensus is they're close enough, I'll leave it as-is. If the consensus is the Glendale stuff is still significantly better, then I'll look to upgrade.

Appreciate your input. Thanks in advance.
 

C-4

Member
Messages
14,562
While I am not familiar with the Glendale hardware, you might also look into the Rutters Tele upgraded bridge and saddles. I went for those and was very happy.
 

ReddRanger

Member
Messages
3,085
I put a Glendale bridge and saddles on an MIM standard tele years ago and it was a really nice setup.

That said, the stock bridge on my 52 RI has been good enough for me and I‘ve never felt the need to replace it. Just not worth it IMO.
 

Timbre Wolf

>thermionic<
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
10,724
I've used Glendale bridge plates, and I have one in a guitar still. But - please consider that sometimes an expensive upgrade is not necessarily an improvement. Flimsy parts are an element of classic character on many guitars. I'd say - leave it be.
 

Totally Bored

Member
Messages
9,459
52RI Bridge is dam SEXY why change it :omg


original.jpg
 

musicman1

Member
Messages
4,830
I think the stock fender bridge is fine. I changed my saddles to Glendale brass compensated and they are good. Frankly I think the stock fender brass saddles do sound a bit better but you can’t beat the value in being able to get the intonation really good on a three saddle bridge. I think fender sells their own brand of compensated saddles now and for a lot less than Glendale or Rutters.
 

Mpcoluv

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,941
I think the Glendale is maybe a little thicker steel than the FendEd. It might make a slight difference in tone. Whether you like the change or not is up to you.
 

aiq

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
11,231
Thinking of going back to the brass barrels.

Thread has provided food for thought or “the rat of pain is gnawing on my brain”.

To toan or intone, that is the question.
 

shallbe

Deputy Plankspanker
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
12,290
I don't think upgrading the bridge plate is a big deal, unless you want the finger cutout. The stock Fender plate is fine.

I have bought some nice bridge plates (Callaham, Rutters, Glendale, etc) used on TGP for my builds, and saved good money vs. new. However, I REALLY think there are much better saddles than Fender has in terms of intonation and how they feel under your palm (no screws sticking up). I also think the Fender intonation screws are WAY too long. No one needs that kind of travel and never did, and with the saddles high enough, they can go up into your palm as well. Glendale, Callaham, Rutters and others make great saddle upgrades, and shorter intonation screws are easy to get.









 

Timbre Wolf

>thermionic<
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
10,724
I don't think upgrading the bridge plate is a big deal, unless you want the finger cutout. The stock Fender plate is fine.

I have bought some nice bridge plates (Callaham, Rutters, Glendale, etc) used on TGP for my builds, and saved good money vs. new. However, I REALLY think there are much better saddles than Fender has in terms of intonation and how they feel under your palm (no screws sticking up). I also think the Fender intonation screws are WAY too long. No one needs that kind of travel and never did, and with the saddles high enough, they can go up into your palm as well. Glendale, Callaham, Rutters and others make great saddle upgrades, and shorter intonation screws are easy to get.









That Rutters bridge plate looks thick and solid. That will definitely effect the sound and response of your guitar. You might like that. Or, maybe not.
 

shallbe

Deputy Plankspanker
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
12,290
That Rutters bridge plate looks thick and solid. That will definitely effect the sound and response of your guitar. You might like that. Or, maybe not.

Yes, it is. But he makes several of them. That is the Rutters Bridge, but he makes Vintage, Modern and top loaders as well. I got it used for cheap, with the Glendale saddles! I figured it was worth a try, and I really like it. The area around the pickup underneath is actually milled away, and much thinner than it looks from the top. This Rutters and the Callaham are certainly thicker than typical vintage. The Glendale is not----but they are machined much smoother than Fender, IMO.
 

JP59

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
256
Leave the original bridge on that tele! It's "The Sound" if you know what I mean. I do have other guitars that have Glendale bridges and they are awesome as is Rutters but the original cheap steel Fender bridge with brass saddles is probably why you bought that guitar in the first place.
 

dazco

Member
Messages
15,709
I put a Glendale bridge and saddles on an MIM standard tele years ago and it was a really nice setup.

That said, the stock bridge on my 52 RI has been good enough for me and I‘ve never felt the need to replace it. Just not worth it IMO.
Thats because past a certain point where junk is no longer part of the equasion, there are no upgrades. Just changes that for SOME may be an upgrade depending on their ears, amp, the guitar, etc. Speaking strickly tone, and that is the main concern, I too would not bother putting a glendale or other on my teles because they are great as is. Maybe the glendale is better looking or the screws are located better or some such thing, but i wouldn't sacrifice a single percent of tone for that. Thats not to say they aren't good, but it's 50/50 as to whether i'd be happy i did or unhappy. People seem to think high quality parts=tone but thats just not the case any more then the opposite.
 

hank57

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,377
Just the plates edges are my issue. I still prefer the sides removed as some Glendale choices.

I doubt i can hear difference between metals so I’m all about the playability.
 

sunking101

Member
Messages
2,931
I don't think upgrading the bridge plate is a big deal, unless you want the finger cutout. The stock Fender plate is fine.

I have bought some nice bridge plates (Callaham, Rutters, Glendale, etc) used on TGP for my builds, and saved good money vs. new. However, I REALLY think there are much better saddles than Fender has in terms of intonation and how they feel under your palm (no screws sticking up). I also think the Fender intonation screws are WAY too long. No one needs that kind of travel and never did, and with the saddles high enough, they can go up into your palm as well. Glendale, Callaham, Rutters and others make great saddle upgrades, and shorter intonation screws are easy to get.









If your neck angle is correct where it joins the body then shorter screws will allow you to set a perfectly nice action, not have the saddles nosedived and not have the screws sticking up above the height of the saddles.

Mine here is a stock Fender 52 RI bridge with stock saddles but I've put shorter screws in.

 

dehughes

Member
Messages
1,156
Why are Teles soooo cool? I just don't get it. But I get it.

Thanks for the replies. I'll call this "leave it alone" and be done with it. Stock bridgeplate/saddles are just fine and don't poke me, so the question was mostly regarding tone/vibe/feel/etc..

And thanks all for the great pics of your Teles. The Yellow one and the White one are the top two IMHO.

But really, thanks for saving me about $200. I owe you all a beer.
 




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