Glendale Strat Bridge?

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by Cobra, Apr 15, 2008.

  1. Cobra

    Cobra Supporting Member

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  2. Trebor Renkluaf

    Trebor Renkluaf I was hit by a parked car, what's your excuse? Gold Supporting Member

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    Ouch that's pricey. I'm not sure what advantage that would have over a standard strat trem other than to make a strat sound more like a tele. I'm not sure I'd want that.
     
  3. gkoelling

    gkoelling Member

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    I've seen these before but IMO they're a little pricey.
     
  4. Dana Olsen

    Dana Olsen Gold Supporting Member

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    Still, I'd love to try one out. Hey, it might just sounds GREAT .... It sure LOOKS interesting.

    It may be that one of the things that makes Strats sound, well, stratty, is the 6 bridge saddles config. I'd love to hear that Glendale take on the Strat w/ Tele saddles bridge sometime.

    Thanks, Dana O.
     
  5. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    brilliant idea. knowing glendale's work, it will also be brilliantly executed. i'm ordering some asap.
     
  6. Terry McInturff

    Terry McInturff 40th Anniversary of guitar building! Gold Supporting Member

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    Looks like a worthy thing for me to audition on the trem version of the TerryCaster.
     
  7. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    right? how cool is that? i love that fact that they're offering different block materials as well.
     
  8. Cobra

    Cobra Supporting Member

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    Yeah, no doubt they're expensive, just about eveything is these days. I have Glendale Tele bridges & saddles on all 3 of my Tele's, & far & away they are the absolute best out there. I've tried them all, & to my ear nothing comes close. They're superior products that deliver the goods.
    I've toyed with the idea of drilling out my Callaham bridges so they can take the 3 Tele saddles, but after seeing these Glendales, I'm leaning...
    As far as advantages over 6-saddles go, the combined string pressure of 2 strings pressing down on each saddle is part of what makes a Tele sound like a Tele, among other things, but this is definitely part of the Tele mojo...
    Do I want my Strats to sound like Tele's?
    No, but I don't use my whammy anyway, my strats bridges lay flush on the body.
    Hopefully Matte will be able to post his impressions on these bridges soon, & clips would be most helpful...
    Hint, hint...
     
  9. Dana Olsen

    Dana Olsen Gold Supporting Member

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    Plus Matte, as you wrote above, you know the execution will be dazzling, whether in steel or brass.

    I'm a big fan of Glen. I think it's high time somebody actually made this bridge - the Strat/ Tele hybrid bridge - in a well thought out, well made package. I wish him real success with it.

    And I hope to play one real soon.

    Thanks, Dana O.
     
  10. Zane

    Zane Member

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    I saw a Glendale Strat just this morning...didn't get a chance to play it, but it looked myt cool!
    might have been this'n , it was red...

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Terry McInturff

    Terry McInturff 40th Anniversary of guitar building! Gold Supporting Member

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    I went back to his site and I did'nt catch the block options thing. Probably a "Senior moment" (I will be 52 in June).

    Since we'll get the neck pitch absolutely correct, there will be no problem with the saddle height adjustment screws protruding above the top of the saddle (I do not like that nor do I care for custom trimming those screws)...provided said screws are the right length. I would like to see him ramp over and soften the outer edges of the Hi and lo E string saddles.

    As for the mounting/pivot screws, perhaps they are notched ala John Mann? Really even notches with no runout? Hardened screws, I trust?

    Back to the outer E string saddles...I'd like to see the bridge plate have milled tracks ala Gotoh in order to capture the hi/lo E height adjustment screws, and thus discourage side-to-side saddle motion.....without introducing any additional fasteners.

    Finally, and importantly, I would need a top loading, non-threaded arm with a tension adjustment via a screw (accessable from the top!) bearing against a nylotron bushing, again ala Gotoh..or the knurled Schaller "Floyd" approach. As a player, I just do not dig a threaded arm. I have gigged enough to know my preference in THAT department! The original threaded arm/threaded block design is flawed. It does not work for long on the road. The threads strip and one reaches a point at which the arm will not have the correct "hang"...and so the arm's "action becomes a distraction"....eonough to wake us up out of a musical dream.

    It appears that the arm is threaded ala trad Strat...which threads into a threaded hole in the block, again ala trad Strat. If the block is brass, those threads are going to have a pretty short life span. In other words...if you are a vibrato bridge player...you are definitely going to have a preference as to how the arm "swings and parks". If we have fragile threads any "perfect setting" will be short-lived.

    In the case of a threaded brass block...which mates with a threaded steel arm..the feel of the arm will be changed by the end of a 45 minute set....if you use the bar ala Jeff Beck, or more. It is going to strip, more slowly if you use the bar for a more gentle, wavering effect. But it WILL strip. A top-loading, non-threaded and adjustable setup is the only way to go.

    I mean not to critisise a gentleman who seems to be a very dedicated, immensely talented, passionate, and wonderful supplier of outstanding things guitar.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    All of the above, plus what is already there (gorgeous) would be the best trem I've seen for my tastes.

    Just a wish-list from an overly-anal observer. Probably best to ignore me and to move on!
     
  12. Dana Olsen

    Dana Olsen Gold Supporting Member

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    HeyTerry -

    My pal Pete just tried a John Mann Strat bridge - w/ the mounting screws notched a la PRS. It works really well, of course it's well built (John Mann - excellent machining) and sounds pretty good too. A litle more mids than a traditional Strat bridge, I thought. The trem action was very smooth, and it came back to pitch very well.

    This Glendale effort looks more traditional to me - looks like a vintage type Strat mount w/ regular wood screws in the pic, but it's hard to tell .... He's using allen screws instead of slotted ones in the saddles - I'm not sure whether that's 'mo 'bettah or not. This arm looks threaded to me, at least I don't see a bushing in the pic ...

    I think all of us have at one time or another chewed up the palms of out right hands playing a Tele that has long saddle screws - Man, that hurts, especially during the last set (OUCH!).

    This'll be fun! Oh, the Mann unit sold for $169. I think this one's $249 for non-manufacturers, but they're apples and oranges - the Glendale is very unique.

    Thanks, Dana O.
     
  13. Terry McInturff

    Terry McInturff 40th Anniversary of guitar building! Gold Supporting Member

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    Thanks Dana,

    I do not know what got into me but...I went ahead and posted specs for what would appeal to me as being the feature set that would.. in it's whole... comprise my favorite vibrato bridge ever.

    Hopefully someone will take the hint and to make it a reality.

    I am an active player as well as a guitar maker. Those of us who really use a vibe bridge as part of our style are very often really picky about vibrato bridge features. And we often want the bridge to be a tour-able thing....ie something that works and is adjustable with a minimum of parts.

    I see features to be admired in the new bridge for sure.

    Main thing...no serious user of the "whammy bar" wants a non-adjustable, prone-to-stripping arm. It will not tour.

    But the maker of this bridge really shows world-class talent...that is beyond debate.

    For someone to show that level of craftsmanship as regards a guitar bridge...we should all be grateful.

    I already feel bad about putting forth any percieved critismn regarding the valiant..and outstanding..efforts of a fellow comrade-in-arms. My goal was to lay out what I feel to be the ideal feature set...in addition to what is already offerred...in order to make a request for what I feel is my ideal.
     
  14. enharmonic

    enharmonic Old Growth Gold Supporting Member

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    Hey Terry, it doesn't "read" bad. Comes across as the distillation of a master luthier's 28+ years of experience with vibrato's of all makes and models. If anything, you're laying out what amounts to a fully realized product for anyone possessing the means to make it. Someone could probably make a career off of building just such a bridge. :BEER

    The Glendale is a sexy piece of machinery, that's for sure.
     
  15. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    i would think that a stock vintage strat bridge with 70s-style brass saddles would get most of the tone of that glendale creation. as for the arm thread issue, mr. callaham's solution seems pretty clever, and "close to vintage" to boot.
     
  16. Terry McInturff

    Terry McInturff 40th Anniversary of guitar building! Gold Supporting Member

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    I would agree, Walter, but with all due respect, it is reliant upon the threads and the built-in bushing fit for the "swing and hang".

    Good stuff no doubt! And I do not mean to say that it is deficient.

    To me the best solution is to have an adjustable "clutch"....the arm assembly has zero impact upon tone but mucho impact upon the musical use of the bridge...as well as the tour-ability.

    Just my opinion!
     
  17. paulg

    paulg Supporting Member

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    You can easily (yes, easily with a drill press) modify a standard Strat bridge to accomadate brass tele saddles. Just drill three holes between the existing saddle screw holes (strings: 1+2, 3+4 and 5+6). Get youself some saddles ( haven't tried them but RS sells them for $10) and your on your way.
     
  18. Mowcheeba

    Mowcheeba Member

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    The "Chimemaster" strat bridge is now on sale for
    150 USD. Seems like a fair price......
    http://www.glendaleguitars.com
    Hope some Strat owner would buy one and give a tone report.
     
  19. Eric Pykala

    Eric Pykala Member

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    Very interesting. My friends at GT saddles make Tele-style compensated saddles for the Am. Std/Dlx. bridge with the offset screws. However, althought the design is cool-looking, the tone is not that great. I attribute the problem to the heavy Fender bridgeplate and the cheeseball block. Looks like Glendale might have fixed that, so I'd really like to hear this bridge.-Eric
     
  20. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    I ordered the brass/brass version when it went to $ 149, shipping included.
    Dale has a winner here. I installed it on a Highway One partscaster with a Warmoth VM 1 + 11/16ths fatback and Gotoh "klusons", 4 trem springs and the claw about 1/2 way into the body, and the playability and tone are really sweet. The saddles are not 5/16ths but 1/4 in diameter, and the big block is chrome plated brass, and the guitar sounds like the biggest, most acoustic Strat you've ever played. Thru a Reissue Twin, yeah. I've got about .050 inches of float, and the only thing not tested is the trem arm. I still prefer a Gilmore arm from Bill C. and the way it fits in a Callaham block, but overall this is the Strat I am playing. Even with these stock overwound Alnico 3s. Oh, I used the 6 hardened steel mount screws from Bill Callaham; I really didn't look at the screws Dale sent me.

    Bubbanov
     

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