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Gluing small round neodymium magnets to wood in speaker cabs

Jon Silberman

10Q Jerry & Dickey
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
41,982
What's the best glue to use for a strong, permanent bond? This is to attach the removable wooden frame grill cloth cover. I have some Duro Super Glue on hand, would that be a good choice? Thanks.

 

Astronaut FX

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,867
I believe Locktite has a formula designed for wood/metal. If you're dead set on that method that may be your best bet. Have you considered Velcro instead of magnets?
 

RussB

low rent hobbyist
Messages
11,158
A 2 part epoxy is what I'd use...not to say that your superglue wouldn't do the trick
 

Astronaut FX

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,867
Oh, another solution. They sell those magnets with holes in them (like donuts). You can screw them in. No need to worry about glue holding.
 

Silent Sound

Member
Messages
5,253
A 2 part epoxy is what I'd use...not to say that your superglue wouldn't do the trick
Yeah. Just rough up the side of the magnet that you want the glue with some coarse sandpaper or something to give it a textured surface for the epoxy to stick to. A good 2 part epoxy, if done right, will be about as permanent of a solution as you can find.

A non-permanent solution would be hot glue. Hot glue will bond most anything and can be removed with rubbing alcohol.
 

xtian

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,497
I looked into this recently, the Intertubez says hot glue may demagnatize rare earth magnets!

My plan was to drill holes in the OPPOSITE side of the wood and drop the magnets into the holes, so that a thin (1/8") layer of wood on both pieces separate the magnets. The magnets still have plenty of force to hold the pieces together.
 

Jon Silberman

10Q Jerry & Dickey
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
41,982
I believe Locktite has a formula designed for wood/metal. If you're dead set on that method that may be your best bet. Have you considered Velcro instead of magnets?
Velcro's cool, too, but I'm replacing a baffle that already uses the magnets which work great.
 

J M Fahey

Member
Messages
2,693
Don't go through the other side, leaving the exact thickness is difficult, just drill from the front, enough to sit the magnets flush, degrease them with alcohol or thinner and a clean piece of cloth or cotton, let them dry a couple minutes and push them inside the already fresh epoxy loaded hole with a toothpick so it oozes around , then cut excess with a sharp blade.
 

xtian

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,497
If you're using magnets on BOTH surfaces of the object to be joined, the magnets have to be aligned the way they want! Easier to use some steel plate or something on one half. Fender washer?
 

Silent Sound

Member
Messages
5,253
I looked into this recently, the Intertubez says hot glue may demagnatize rare earth magnets!
Yeah, the intertubez say a lot of things. It'll be fine for what you're doing. Neodymium magnets will lose some strength when applied to heat, but even with a high temp glue gun, you're not approaching the Curie temperature of the magnet. And while they can still lose strength before they reach the Curie temp., you're not exposing them to the heat for very long, nor do you need the strength of the magnet to be precise. The threat of a magnet that's being exposed to heat below the Curie temp is more of a long term problem than a short term one. So it'd be a bad idea to use one in a car engine where high heat is constant, but if you're just exposing it for a few seconds during manufacture, you'll be fine. So in your case, I seriously doubt you'd notice the difference in strength between a magnet that's been hot glued and one that hasn't. If you did, then someone seriously sucks at hot gluing.
 

TimmyP

Member
Messages
2,488
I'd use contact cement. Hot glue will pop off. Superglue might work. As was stated, no need for a magnet on both pieces.
 

Jon Silberman

10Q Jerry & Dickey
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
41,982
Hi again. Tim at TRM cabs (who built my cab* on which the magnets in the stock baffle are tight as heck) just replied to my inquiry as follows: "Hi Jon. I use Ducos all purpose cement It comes in a green tube like model car glue. But super glue will work fine too. Just don't glue your fingers."


* (shown with Jensen Tornados; now has Weber NeoMags)

 




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