Going from 22 to 24 fret guitar, any trouble?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by orourke, Mar 23, 2015.

  1. orourke

    orourke Member

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    I've been getting close to buying a PRS S2 Custom 24. I've played a few in a couple of stores and the guitar is calling to me. One thing that appeals to me is the more shimmery tone of the neck pickup. I don't care that much about the higher notes, I might use them once in a while, but I'm more of a classic rock/psychedelic/electronic player, not a shredder.

    Most of my main guitars a Les Paul scale 22 fret guitars. I was wondering if anyone has experience going from 22 to 24 frets - if it took anytime to get used to the extra frets. When playing the guitar in the shop, there are a couple of tunes where I slide up and down the neck and I got a little confused about where I was on the fret board. Also, I'm used to blocks or dot's not freakin' birds.
     
  2. Promit

    Promit Member

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    It alters the tone a bit by pushing the neck pickup towards the bridge, but as usual this is a sum-of-all-parts change. If it sounds good, then that's all that matters. It doesn't play any different, as far as feel goes.
     
  3. PW214

    PW214 Member

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    The only thing I really notice is not so much the extra frets but hand positioning on the neck. I'm so used to the 7th fret (for example) being in a certain part of the neck, that invariably I accidentally slide down to the 9th. I have two 22 fret electric guitars and two 24. Doesn't take long though to get used to it...but if you switch back and forth like I do, sometimes I just forget and go to far.
     
  4. GuitarsFromMars

    GuitarsFromMars Member

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    The only part of owning a 24 fret PRS I have a problem with is the harmonic nodes are not in the places the are on a Fender or a Gibson. This makes for dead spots with a slide.
     
  5. C-4

    C-4 Member

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    I went from 22 frets to 24 frets, and now I like the 24 fret versions far better.
     
  6. nflea7

    nflea7 Member

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    Personal taste. I've had CU22's 24's singlecuts, mira's McCarty's etc on down the line. Never a SE or S2, for the money of a new S2 there are so many used USA PRS floating around I don't know why you would settle for a S2. Even in a rural area nowhere near a Guitar Center you can still get on their website do a used gear search find a nice used USA PRS for your budget and have it shipped to your door for 20 bucks. If you don't like it you have a 30 day return policy. This goes for an GC in the US.

    I have a custom made 22 fret Carvin (by custom I mean all the specs on the guitar were of my choosing, the custom neck blank was sent to the Carvin along with all electronics. They cut the wood and assembled the guitar from parts sent in) And I just acquired a Warrior that is a 24 fret. I'm playing the Warrior a ton because its my new toy. But overall its not as balanced as the carvin and it sits different on my body if I'm standing and playing.

    That is the main thing about the PRS guitars, I had a 95 CU22 that was top heavy and tended to fall forward from the neck, I've never had a custom 24 do that. Every CU24 I've own has been the most balanced guitar I've ever owned.

    I've also had both a Les Paul and a CU24 at the same time and they are different animals. I play and sing so I can't always look down at where my hands are so I need to play a guitar I'm going to gig with the week before the show so I'm comfortable knowing where my left hand will land naturally.

    I don't think switching you'll have any issues as its mostly muscle memory. The shorter scales and 22 fret guitars tend to be easier to bend notes on, 24s tend to be more shredder friendly or playing more precision.

    My 2c it also depends on the gutiar. If you love a CU24 its a great guitar, get the best one you can afford. after a few days of playing you'll get use to where the frets are.
     
  7. Nickstrtcstr

    Nickstrtcstr Lactose Intolerant Guitar Slinger

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    It really is no big deal. I picked up a PRS Custom 24 a couple of weeks ago.
     
  8. varjao

    varjao Member

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    For the stuff I play I prefer 24 frets, but there's nothing like the sound of a neck pickup exactly where Gibson placed it, right after the 22 fret.
     
  9. orourke

    orourke Member

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    Thanks for the detailed answer nflea7.

    Everyone here has given me a lot to think about and some really good info. I'm just going to hold my horses and play a lot of guitars before I pull the trigger.
     
  10. AXEnGEAR4J

    AXEnGEAR4J Supporting Member

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    I think it's harder sometimes to go back to 22 when you've played 24's for so long!
     
  11. bob-i

    bob-i Member

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    I took maybe a week of playing everyday to get used to the fret position, then I became very natural.

    Funny that what I dislike about the 24 fret PRS is the neck pickup.
     
  12. AdmiralB

    AdmiralB Silver Supporting Member

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    How does the number of frets affect this? If I take a Fender neck and cut the 22nd fret 'shelf' off, have I changed a node location?
     
  13. Whitecat

    Whitecat Member

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    I'm not sure about cutting a neck but this graphic explains it pretty well:

    [​IMG]
     
  14. AdmiralB

    AdmiralB Silver Supporting Member

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    I ain't seeing it. Nodes are in the same place, assuming scale hasn't changed. Why would the number of frets and/or length of the fingerboard change the vibration characteristics of the string?
     
  15. Whitecat

    Whitecat Member

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    The nodes are in the same place, but the pickups aren't, because of the fret difference -that's the point. The pickups are not changing the string vibration characteristics, they're simply 'hearing' the strings differently. Just as your guitar sounds different unplugged if you strum them next to the bridge vs next to the neck.
     
  16. TheFlyingBear

    TheFlyingBear Member

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    So a neck pickup on a 24 fret guitar doesn't have more dead spots, just different ones.

    If anything, I think the 24 fret pickup position solves more problems than it creates. For example, when you play the 5th fret harmonic on a strat or tele, the neck pickup doesn't "hear" it because it is sitting right under a node, so there is essentially no vibration there. On 24 fret guitars, you can hear those harmonics when using the neck pickup.
     
  17. AdmiralB

    AdmiralB Silver Supporting Member

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    The bridge pickup almost certainly isn't moved.

    But what you're talking about has nothing directly to do with the number of frets - you're talking about where the pickups are placed. Look at an SG, for example.
     
  18. AdmiralB

    AdmiralB Silver Supporting Member

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    You can hear it on G&Ls, because they moved the neck pickup a little bit. Fret count doesn't have anything to do with it in this case.
     
  19. varjao

    varjao Member

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    Since I started on a 24 fret I never say it like an extended version, actually I kind of thought the 22 fret like a shorter one but since it's so classic I just thought it was a different thing. A 21 fret on the other hand I would feel strange even thought I don't go that high.

    Anyway, in a 24 fret is much more comfortable to play within the 14-20 fret range, there's more room.
     
  20. Whitecat

    Whitecat Member

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    Correct - it's the neck pickup that's very specifically in a different spot, and thus sounds substantially different to a 22-fret guitar. Look at the pic again. This is a big talking point when people compare the guitars - feel aside, the neck pickup sound is not at all the same. For whatever reason, it's far more focussed on a 24-fret guitar, no matter what the scale length.

    It has everything to do with it - this part is important and the root of this fact: the pickups have to be placed where they are because of the extended fretboard. That's what I'm saying. That's what he was saying. That's why 22 and 24 fret guitars are tonally different.

    Edit: here's an even better explanation -

    [​IMG]
     

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