Going from a Les Paul to a Strat?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Tapp, Dec 12, 2005.

  1. Tapp

    Tapp Member

    Messages:
    198
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    I know a lot of you guys play multiple guitars and I like to as well. My main guitar has been a '96 Les Paul Std and I also have a '97 Amer std Strat. I like the tone of the Strat but I'm having difficulty going back to the Strat since the neck is so different. I fumble up on the Strat seemingly a lot more than the Les Paul. Is there a Strat I should be looking for that maybe has a closer neck feel to the Paul? I've played the Eric Johnson but didn't care for the V shape up at the top. Any suggestions or should I just suck it up LOL.

    Tapp
     
  2. satinsixstring

    satinsixstring Member

    Messages:
    54
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    I think you may be having trouble due to scale length differances.

    I have owned both at the same time, and switched a betwwen them all the time. I would tell ya to just practice it, and you'll pick it up fine.
     
  3. michael patrick

    michael patrick Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,830
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    Location:
    Madison, WI
    I was a Strat player exclusively for a lot of years. And then I got an SG, and it took a while to get used to it. Now I own a bunch of different guitars with differing neck sizes and have no trouble going from one to another. Like satinsixstring said, I think it is just a matter of practice...
     
  4. CharlieNC

    CharlieNC Member

    Messages:
    581
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2005
    Location:
    Fort Bragg
    you are probably having trouble with the scale length. the les paul neck is shorter at 24 3/4" as opposed to the strat's long scale of 25 1/2". basically, your fingers are having to span a greater distance on the strat to cover the same relative tonal region on the les paul. warmoth makes a 24 3/4" strat neck, what they call a "conversion" neck, but honestly a lot of the strat sound comes from the longer scale. you get a crisper, cleaner note, but it is harder to play for some people. my advice, suck it up. once you can man handle a strat then the les paul will seem much easier. or you could do all of your scale and lead practice on the strat and then go back to the les paul for gigs until you get more comfortable with it. a strat does make you work harder, but i think it's worth it in the end.
     
  5. TAVD

    TAVD Guitar Player Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,458
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    MD
    Buy a cheap bass or baritone guitar to play around the house. After switching between that and guitar, the difference b/t the 2 guitars won't seem so great.
     
  6. Tapp

    Tapp Member

    Messages:
    198
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Funny you say that Denyle; I'm really a bass player LOL!!

    Thanks for the advise guys I will suck it up and keep going.

    Tapp
     
  7. pesocaster

    pesocaster Member

    Messages:
    140
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    Gig Harbor WA
    I have the exact opposite problem.... I'm a strat head that want's to be a LP guy.... I'm most comfortable with the Strat's scale.... so this was my compromise:

    http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?t=117361

    I am a very happy guy...

    Maybe look into something similar... short scale with a flatter radius fretboard etc....
     
  8. Tone_Terrific

    Tone_Terrific Member

    Messages:
    24,602
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2004
    Location:
    Canada-GTA
    The perfect LP/Strat/tele blend has yet to be made. IMO.
    Someone should allow me to test/develop their prototypes for the next xx years........
     
  9. trisonic

    trisonic Member

    Messages:
    13,163
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2003
    Location:
    NJ out of England
    Or, do what I did.
    Commission Bill Chapin to build a Strat to true Gibson scale length. He does it right, the pick ups are in the right place - plus he handwinds them to sound how you want them. He'll also make a neck to fit you.

    Best, Pete.
     
  10. Guinness Lad

    Guinness Lad Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    15,338
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2004
    Location:
    On top a mountain of Chocolate Chips
    Just alternate every day for two or three weeks, by then you'll wonder why you even wrote this thread.
     
  11. Papajuice

    Papajuice Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,037
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2003
    Location:
    wylie tx
    Try a Anderson, Great strat style and if you like the shorter scales. Try a cobra or a Atom, both can get strat like tones and lp tone's. Especialy with M pickups.
     
  12. shawntp

    shawntp Member

    Messages:
    1,779
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    I know this thread is long since over ...but for the future surfers.

    I play a Les Paul Classic (swapped pickups to 57' Classics) and a Custom Stop Stratocaster.

    I find the slim taper/thinner classic neck and the "soft-v" (this is not a standard strat neck) of the strat to be pretty transitionable.

    The scale doesnt bother me at all.
     
  13. SteveStrat

    SteveStrat Member

    Messages:
    236
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Location:
    Richland, WA
    I played Strats for years and bought a Les Paul about a year ago. I had many of the same problems you've described only in reverse. But now I can easily switch between the two and have really come to apperciate the tone and playability of both.

    Just keep playing them......your playing will adjust eventually.

    Steve
     
  14. Pete Galati

    Pete Galati Member

    Messages:
    1,685
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Do the Peter Green magnet flip thing on your Les Paul, and make sure it's wired like a '50s Les Paul. That should give your Les Paul a wider tone range than a Strat.. Unless you're after that Strat Quack sound. It won't do that very well, but it'll sound better doing it.

    Pete
     
  15. scottlr

    scottlr Member

    Messages:
    22,681
    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Location:
    Born & raised in Texas; stranded in Iowa
    I was a complete Gibson guy for all of my life until about 1981, when I bought a G&L because I was playing in a top 40 band, and the then current songs were almost all done on Strats. I needed single coil and a trem. After 5 years playing Strats exclusively, I have to say I am now a Fender guy. I own several Gibsons, and 2 Gretsches, but the Fenders are where my heart is. But, I will not get rid of the Gibbys. The Gretsches could someday be put on the block, at least before the Gibsons. But I'll likely keep them all. But I just can't stop buying Fenders. And there was a time when I thought a bolt neck was ****! And I still think there's more craftmanship to a set neck, but them damn Fenders are purt near indestructible! And after all, that is what a player needs, right? AND, they sound purty damn good, too!
     
  16. Sparky6string

    Sparky6string Member

    Messages:
    3,527
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Location:
    Thither
    I wonder if he's playing LPs or Strats these days. :D
     
  17. Pete Galati

    Pete Galati Member

    Messages:
    1,685
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Eventually he'll miss the danger element of playing a guitar who's peghead'll snap off the neck like a dried out twig.

    He'll be back!

    Pete
     
  18. scottlr

    scottlr Member

    Messages:
    22,681
    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Location:
    Born & raised in Texas; stranded in Iowa
    I do love em both, for different reasons. It is probably the sheer hours I have spent with a Strat strapped on that make it the most comfortable for me. Playing 6 nights a week for 5-6 years in a row can make you get comfy with whatever you have :) I wish I'd have had the $$$$ to be able to have 2 Strats and 2 Gibbys back then. There were a few songs I'd have certainly preferred the Gibsons for. But being a poor starving road player, I had to be satisfied with what I could afford.

    These days, my #1 go to guitar has been a 62 RI MIJ Strat in Shell Pink w/fat 50s, for the last 7 years. No matter what, I ALWAYS get tone from that guitar. Baseball bat neck, crappy thin vintage frets, and tone for days! Worth the suffering LOL I am starting to really warm up to my USA 57 RI in CAR, and it may become the new #1 Strat. But the Teles are starting to win the Fender battle! And then, the LP is always sitting there, like a secret weapon, ready to go into action. With a 61 RI SG by its side and an 81 ES347 as well, and the lowly LP JR ready to give its life... Jeeze, this is getting sappy, huh? You know what I mean. Guitars are just cool!
     
  19. bluesjuke

    bluesjuke Disrespected Elder

    Messages:
    24,156
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2005
    Location:
    Gretchen's House, Bluesland, TX.

    I've noticed that myself!

    Been going back & forth between Gibsons & Fenders all of my playing life.
    When I went to Gibson , with still having a Strat, on a regular basis I noticed the difference more as it wasn't having one or the other anymore.
    As you said Scott, wish I had the money for both way back when.


    Recently I got a ;56 Strat Heavy Relic witht the 9.5" radius & 6105 frets.
    I had to sell my '57 Start, which I loved, in order to finance it.
    I tried to buy several used 56's so I could keep the '57 also but it did not work out.

    That turned out to be a good thing though as the new '56 that I ended up with has impeccable fret work on it.
    The neck relief is the same or less than all of my Gibsons & the action lower than them also.
    I ususally don't care for my strings to be that low & I do like more neck relief than most people but it just works right on this Strat.

    Still feels just like a Strat but it has made the Strat/ Gibson crossover more comfortable.

    Tapp, Live with it as you have to have both.
    May be that you could look into a different setup on your Start to help lessen the differences.
     
  20. Framus

    Framus Member

    Messages:
    264
    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    :cool: Contrary to what is supposed common knowledge...

    Fender does play around with different Strat and Tele necks.

    As an example:

    I bought two identical,brand new...or so I thought...1991 American Standard Strats at the same time.

    They look identical,but one had a much thinner neck profile and a weird Gibson style flat fretboard radius....remember both were bone stock Strats,not anything special.

    I quickly found out I preferred playing the weird one much more than the standard C Fender neck profile because I owned an SG and a LP Custom.

    It definitely has faster speed capability than a standard Strat neck...so it gets played more.

    I have saw other weird neck profiles and shapes on bone stock teles...so it does happen.

    The scale length is not an issue to me...I learned to adjust automatically...you will too if you play them both enough.
     

Share This Page