Got vocal training techniques?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by FL6, Feb 24, 2009.

  1. FL6

    FL6 Member

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    After reading the ear training techniques thread I thought I would ask about vocal training.

    My voice is awful, even for speaking I have no projection and have a hard time hitting notes, humming or otherwise. I find singing exhausting too, maybe that's why I never bothered to practice. Perhaps lessons would be the best way to go?
     
  2. The Captain

    The Captain Member

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    Get a vocal coach.
    I strted lessons just under a year ago, with no voice, no talent, and no hope.

    Guess what ?? None of that mattered, cos all of that can be taught and learnt.
    I now understand a whole bunch about resonance, projection and placement.
    But I would NEVER have managed on my own, in a million years.
    I worship my singing teacher.
    Of course, as in all things, you have to find a good one, with whom you gel, so be prepared to audition and trial tehm etc.
    I was very lucky and struck gold on my first try.

    Good Luck !!
     
  3. stevel

    stevel Member

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    Agreed. Get a Coach.

    Projection can be worked on pretty easily.
    Exhaustion is simply a matter of endurance, and you'll learn breathing exercises to help (and so will practice).

    As far as pitch, I have met people who are truly Tone-Deaf. Now, I'm not totally convinced that they can't match pitch. I actually think there's a misunderstanding about what it is their supposed to be doing, so when you say "sing this note", they may not understand some part of that basic concept. So they may actually be capable of matching pitch, but they're not aware for some reason that they're not matching pitch, or they think what they're doing is matching pitch. I know it sounds kind of simplistic, but for those people, I think it's a mental disconnect somewhere.

    Other people just give up too easily. Still other people have a problem Like they sing in falsetto instead of full voice, etc.) that they don't realize needs fixing.

    But a good vocal coach should be able to identify what it is that's giving you trouble and at least improve it (and by the way, improving your voice goes hand in hand with improving your ears - you really have to pay attention - listen - to what you're doing).

    You may want to start with some Spoken Word type pieces, or even Rap if you like it.

    In one of my previous bands, our Bass Player, who did not sing very well, did "Funky Cold Medina" and songs that have that sort of "half-singing, half-talking" kind of singing. Or like Lou Reed :)

    Obviously, if you can get better at pitch matching, that will make you more marketable as a bandmate, but if you start on those "speech-songs" you'll have a chance to build up your endurance before you worry too much about pitch matching. Furthermore, you'll have a nice repretoire of songs you can bring to a band (hey, lead singers can't sing ALL the songs ALL the time - it will go to their head!).

    Try to find a coach that specializes in popular music. While many people do benefit from Opera lessons, it's not for everyone - and that's what many "Voice Instructors" teach.

    HTH,
    Steve
     
  4. jhvox

    jhvox Member

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  5. The Captain

    The Captain Member

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    I agree that singing improves the ears. It has done more for my ears than any amount of guitar playing.
    Not using full voice is both a confidence issue nad not knowing how to use resonance.
    I believe that we are all pretty much born wiht the ability to sing, but for too many of us in Western cultures, we are shamed into silence as children.
    In cultures and sub-cultures where singing is a part of daily life and where adults sing as a matter of course without shame, this doe snot happen, so there is a much higher proportion of able singers. It's easy to see this in pretty much any black culture.
    The good thing about this is that most everybody has way more potential than they realise. It takes work and dedication to unlock a closed voice though, and I have a long way to go, but it is a joyous journey and well worth the effort.
    There probably are people who have such a disconnect from pitch that thye may never get it. My teacher has had pupils who do not have any prosody (normal rise and fall) in their speech voice, and gettign them going was a struggle even for her.
    that's teh bell curve at work though, and anyone who can play a musicla instrument will almost certainly get the hang of signing with the aid of a coach.
    I'm less bothered about teh diffeerence between pop and opera. My wife asked me at one stage when I was goign to stop singign like an opera singer and learn to sing real songs. I joked about this with my teacher and we agreed that it's pretty easy to step back to a rock or pop style once you have learnt how to use your whole voice fully and effectively. Stepping up to a full-on rock howl wthout that is pretty hard though, unless you are a natural.
     
  6. FL6

    FL6 Member

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    Thanks for the responses, I'm going to look into coaching.
    It's nice to hear it's not a lost cause too.
     
  7. Ooogie

    Ooogie Member

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    That's a real nice podcast series, I'm the classic case of a non-singer...fit a lot of the examples on your site...just never learned the basics/fundamentals. In the last few years I've really been trying to correct that and you have a great way of explaining the issues. The simple exercises and examples you sing do a great job of showing you how it's supposed to sound and feel.

    Thanks & nice job,
    Mark
     
  8. jhvox

    jhvox Member

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    Hi Mark,

    Glad you enjoyed the podcasts. Thank you for the kind words.
     
  9. fish78

    fish78 Member

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    Not to hijack, but can someone with a rather deep voice ever learn the Roy Orbison high pitch style? Think "Crying"
     
  10. fbcpraise

    fbcpraise Member

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    Probably not. I emphasize probably because I haven't heard you. If you really are a low voice then you can certainly improve your upper voice; and maybe you can approximate the Orbison sound a bit lower. But trying to get your voice to do something it isn't cut out for is pretty punishing and maybe futile. Like trying to be a sprinter when you're cut out to be a distance runner.:horse
     
  11. jacobhf

    jacobhf Member

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    You've been bookmarked, thanks!
     
  12. CHyde

    CHyde Member

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    Can also check out Brett Manning's singingsuccess.com.
     

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