Great cheap slide guitar?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by marvelboy_04, Mar 2, 2012.

  1. marvelboy_04

    marvelboy_04 Member

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    ok, so Im wanting to expand more into the world of slide guitar, but all of my current guitars have 10s and low action. Im wanting a good inexpensive but high quality guitar to slap some 12s on and have for open tunings and high action for slide.
     
  2. mscheiman

    mscheiman Member

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    How much can you spend? I'd go get one of those Ibanez Artists from the late 70s-early 80s with the super 58s. At the risk of getting flamed, I think those things are Les Paul killers. They can be had for $550-700. Not sure if that's the budget range.
     
  3. kanderson

    kanderson Member

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    you don't really need high action for slide. I used to think that too but I got tired of switching guitars at gigs and learned to play slide in standard tuning on my main strat. It's all about the finesse you use.
    Having said that...nothing really sounds like a nice open D tuned slide solo :)
     
  4. dk123123dk

    dk123123dk Member

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    Get an SX from Rondo music for $100. I had their dual p90 LP copy. Worked and sounded great for slide.


    dk
     
  5. straightblues

    straightblues Member

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    I am using my Squier 51 for slide. It sounds good and is cheap. I put a little hotter pickup in the neck. Lots of tonal options with the splitting bridge humbucker.
     
  6. Drawde

    Drawde Member

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    I've been thinking about getting one of those Sx resonators from rondo for like 200 bucks.
     
  7. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    anything that looks cool but plays terrible is a prime candidate for slide guitar! especially if it has low, worn-out frets.

    i have an old gretsch corvette with a huge neck and tiny, tiny frets that i've converted, with a taller nut and 13s in open E.
     
  8. Lance

    Lance Member

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    Look for one of those old Supro lap steels on CL. The type with the huge string through pup. You'll be amazed at how cool it is, and sounds waay bigger than a typical guitar. I see 'em for $400.00 a lot around Norcal.
     
  9. OM Flyer

    OM Flyer Member

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    PRS SE "One." Great P-90/mahogany LP Jr. tone, perfect for gritty slide rock and blues.
     
  10. hank57

    hank57 Silver Supporting Member

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    I had a Melody Maker with a Humbucker that was perfect, but I sold it like a dope....
     
  11. magicaxeman

    magicaxeman Member

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    I just picked up a vintage zip (VZ99) cheap on ebay and to be honest it cried out to be used for slide right from the moment I unpacked it..

    Sub $200 light weight (under 6lbs) les paul jnr style with 2 single coils wired as a humbucker.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. drolling

    drolling Member

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    Walter's right, as usual

    But when I finally broke down and had my electric 'slide' guitar's neck straightened & refretted, I discovered that I could use the technique to any of my guitars if the slide's big enough

    I'm currently using a Diamond Bottleneck in lead crystal, but Dunlop makes something similar in brass/chromed steel; A thick, heavy slide has enough mass to allow me to glide over the strings without applying any downward pressure

    Took awhile to adjust my technique, tho'. At first, I wasn't able to generate enough volume on my acoustics with such a light touch. Eventually, I actually LOWERED the action on my National steel (and the string gauge, too!)

    Worth a shot, and a lot cheaper than getting a new guitar
     
  13. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    that, that is a slide guitar.

    cheap & gaudy FTW.

    also, the primary pickup being a bridge or middle pickup is important, too, so when you zoom up over the 24th fret zone you don't lose the signal.
     
  14. 9fingers

    9fingers Supporting Member

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    Now that one LOOKS like a slide guitar. Way cool!
     
  15. 335guy

    335guy Member

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    Well, I wouldn't say they're cheap now, but original Harmony H42 and H44 Stratotones make wonderful slide guitars. Eastwood is making copies of them now, and while they look similar, the construction, wood and pickups are different. I'd love to have an original but the prices are prohibitive now.

    An early Harmony:

    [​IMG]

    The new Airline H44

    [​IMG]

    I'd also add that yeah, you can and should learn to play slide in standard tuning on a regular guitar, and I do it sometimes. The downside I've noticed is while learning to get your slide touch right, one ends up being a little heavy with the slide and bumping the frets a lot. This can lead to small divots in the frets and makes the guitar hard to play normally. I had this problem with a LP. I have various slides made from glass, ceramic, chromed steel and brass, in various sizes and thicknesses. While I love my heavy brass one for acoustic where the action is higher and the strings heavier, I use a light weight, thin walled brass one for my "regular" guitars. I have also found that using a bit more volume and gain helps with slide guitar as well.
     
  16. dezb1

    dezb1 Member

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    Danelectro 63... Derek Trucks style.
     
  17. mbargav

    mbargav Member

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    +1

    This is what I use mine for. I have one of the RIs and it has pretty big frets (which I like for slide). I keep it in open E and use it exclusively for slide.
     
  18. Whiskeyrebel

    Whiskeyrebel Member

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    My slide rig is based on a plywood Epi Special II. Cheap enough for you? I had a tall nut installed, set the bridge high, and use flatwound 12s on it. Along with a compressor, that's what works for me. I've changed its pickups and pots purely out of the urge to mod and tinker, although the stock pickups did sound good with distortion. The only thing on them that absolutely needs changing are the machine heads.
     
  19. unfunnyclown

    unfunnyclown Member

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    Since getting my current No. 1 (CS tele), I keep this in open E with high action:
    [​IMG]
    Very good upper-fret access.
     
  20. mad dog

    mad dog Silver Supporting Member

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    Why limit yourself with high action, terrible playing guitars. A big part of playing slide is what you do with your fingers when you're not using the slide. and that usual means chording and fretting strings.

    I've been using my Samick SAT 650 for slide. Just as with the ES-335 types this budget guitar resembles, it makes an excellent slide guitar. For even cheaper, I'll next try setting up the Yamaha AEX502 for slide. Which for me means slightly raising action on the treble side. That's all it takes. Everything is strung with .11s anyway. The Yamaha is semihollow, thinline, with two P-90s. This should be fun.
    MD
     

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