Gretsch madness

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Laroosco!, Oct 23, 2005.


  1. Laroosco!

    Laroosco! Member

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    Spent quite a bit of time in a local music store in the last couple days. When I was there yesterday I noticed that they had some Gretsches hanging around.

    I've been curious about Gretsches for quite some time but it's hard finding a dealer that stocks them. I've played a couple in the past but have never been able to plug one in. Imagine my surprise when I walk into the store and find a Setzer Sig, a Tennessee Rose, a Vintage Country Gentleman, and a few others.

    While my brother was wheelin and dealin I decided to forgo the Setzer(too much money for me to fall in love with, plus I really want a Horton Heat ssig)and I grabbed the 68 Rally and one of the Jets.

    The Jets were alright. The cheaper Electromatic actually sounded better than the real one but after strumming the first chord on the Rally my reaction was :eek: :eek: :eek:

    Holy crap does this guitar sound nice. It was so easy to dial in the kind of tones I'm always trying to but never can quite nail.
    The Rally I played looked exactly like this one
    [​IMG]

    Now what scares me is that I'm gonna go Gretsch crazy. These things are expensive.
     
  2. QuickDraw

    QuickDraw Member

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    man i love those gretch guitars work of art
     
  3. Rama

    Rama Member

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    I give em a wide berth for the same reason. Could be a big ass can o worms that I don't want to open.

    Last guitar I bought was going to be a Setzer but an EJ Strat caught my eye and saved me at the last moment.

    I figure if I ever do buy my first Gretch it'll be like a dam breaking.:eek:
     
  4. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    If Gretsch had only made a guitar with a fat neck, that's all I would have played. Even so, I had a couple of them, including a Tennessee Rose from the first year of the RIs that was just such a sweet guitar. But the necks make Ibanez Wizards feel like baseball bats... :(
     
  5. Laroosco!

    Laroosco! Member

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    The necks on tthe ones I've played aren't any smaller than ssomne Fenders I've played. No prob for me.
     
  6. pfflam

    pfflam Silver Supporting Member

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    The Electromatic Hollowbodies have good fat necks . . . . and thy're very solid guitars . . . though they could use some upgrading.
     
  7. Laroosco!

    Laroosco! Member

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    I've looked at a couple of the Electromatics.

    I tried a $500 Electromatic Duo Jet next to an $1800 Duo Jet and was surprised that the cheap guitar played as well and actually sounded better.

    I aslo like the Electromatic Hollowbodies, but I get nervous about buying a cheaper Bigsby equipped guitar.

    The Rally I found is a damn nice guitar, and it's marked at $1400. I'm gonna try real hard to make it happen.
     
  8. drolling

    drolling Member

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    Yep, there I was minding my own business, quiety saving up for a Suhr, when I stumbled across a Gretsch that I couldn't say no to.

    They really have improved since Fender stepped in to the picture and their decision to produce the budget line of MIK Electromatics has to be one of the most brilliant marketing ploys ever.

    Once I'd had it for a while, the thought of owning a pro series model evolved into an irresistable compulsion, so now I have two.

    For the money, the Electro hollowbody is flat out THE NICEST electric archtop I've owned. I'm usually pretty quick to start swapping out bits & pieces of my asian made guitars. But the Electro was beautifully setup, required no fret work and the DeArmond 2000 pickups are great sounding DynaSonic knock-offs that are actually made in the USA. The bound short-scale (24.75") neck is pretty chunky, actually, feels a lot like my old Gibson. The Bigsby's not quite as nice as the ones they use on the pro line. Slightly stiffer than the pro model, it's still way more flexable than the one on my Epi WildKat.

    Like I said, I was so knocked-out bv the Electromatic, I began the search for something complimentary in pro series. There are some models w/the skinny necks that I don't like either, but there's an astonishing number of design variations- something for everyone, really.

    I ended up w/a Bamboo Anniversary 6118. A short scale guitar w/2 TV Jones Classic pickups. It's essentially a stripped down 6120 with better pickups. It's neck profile's a bit more slender than the Electro's, but still nice and comfy- no cramping so far.

    Most of these guitars are also available w/long scale (25.5") too, and there's a bewidering assortment of cool sounding pickups, as well.

    Like a tele or a strat, Gretsch guitars (w/singles or hummers) all have a distinctive, unmistakeable voice. They cal it "That Great Gretsch Sound" and they ain't kiddin'!
     
  9. TNJ

    TNJ Gold Supporting Member

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    I have a newer Tennessee Rose 6119.
    GREAT guitar, and I dont mind the neck.
    Chock full of that "Gretsch Sound".
    :cool:
    S
    j
     

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