Grosh neck joints

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by unkindone, Mar 1, 2008.

  1. unkindone

    unkindone Member

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    I see lots of companies are re routing their neck joints (bolt ons) for better sustain? or looks? or whatever the case...

    a few companies that come to mind are anderson, melancon, mcnaughts g4, i think even suhrs bolt on joints have changed recently...

    but with grosh's...not that its a bad thing, their bolt ons are so plane jane like a regular strat...what do you guys think of the joint if you own one or have played a grosh bolt on?

    I don't know why...but thats whats kinda keeping me back from purchasing a bolt on grosh :( am I over my head?
     
  2. atquinn

    atquinn Supporting Member

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    My impression is that the modified neck joints are done for more comfortable upper-fret access. If you don't spend lots of time up there (or are used to playing LPs :D) it wouldn't be a concern. Why not send Don an email and ask why he decided to use the traditional joint instead of engineering a contoured one?

    -Austin
     
  3. keninsyr

    keninsyr Member

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    I own 3 Grosh's and I will say that all 3 neck joints are as near to perfect as you can get. I have not found it hard to play on the upper frets at all.
    It all comes down to personal preference. I owned an Anderson with the contoured neck joint and it was a fine guitar, but I don't think it really gave me any advantage when playing on the upper frets.
     
  4. jads57

    jads57 Supporting Member

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    There`s no money above the 3rd fret!
     
  5. Supasso

    Supasso Member

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    Each neck joint has its own sounds. If you want the vintage tone, you gotta have that bulky square joint + neck plate.

    By the way, Suhr is still using the square joint for its 22-fret guitars (it's contoured though). The new 24-fret model has a different, less obstructive neck joint because, unlike the Classic models, it was not designed to sounds like anything. Given the target group, it's probably a right design choice.
     
  6. bbarnard

    bbarnard Member

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    Actually if I remember correctly from my two Grosh retro classics that I had, there is a slight beveling of the body thickness towards the bottom of the guitar to improve the access to upper frets. It isn't much, it is subtle but I'm pretty sure it is there. It isn't shaped (rounded) like some other joints but I believe my memory is correct.
     
  7. JoeB63

    JoeB63 Supporting Member

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    Why?

    Got proof? Evidence?
     
  8. Aardvark

    Aardvark Silver Supporting Member

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    I currently have Melancon, Suhr and Grosh. The Mel neck joint is without a neck plate and is very contoured. The Suhr and Grosh both use a neck plate. They can make the neck joint in a completely traditional manner but will usually cut away and bevel the body for a theoretical gain in upper fret access. Grosh does this in a more subtle way, leaving more body wood under the neck joint, a theoretical tone advantage compared to the Suhr. In the end, all my guitars with the different neck joints are equally easy to play, and they all sound great. I think I would focus on other aspects, and especially go play a bunch from different builders.
     
  9. JoeB63

    JoeB63 Supporting Member

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    Why?

    Evidence of this?
     
  10. Long2Play

    Long2Play Member

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    Anytime mass is moved in a guitar design it will have some tonal effect. Taylor changed their acoustic neck joint a few years back and had to revoice the guitar tops/bracing to compensate for the sonic change. The NT joint is brighter sounding. Seriously.

    Put different mass tuners on a guitar and you can hear the difference. Change the mass of the inertia block of the trem and you can hear a difference.

    The reason is that neck/joint heel matters is it is a transfer point of vibration energy. Change the mass there and it will change the sound. I did not say one was better, but they will be different. Grosh picked EVERYTHING in his designs for tonal reasons. Fret access is free and easy on a Grosh because Don opened up and deepened the cutaway in his design.

    I hope that helps. Good questions!
     
  11. Supasso

    Supasso Member

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    I'm just repeating what John Suhr wrote in his board. Of course, it's not a proof. It's only an opinion of someone I trust.
     
  12. fastburn430

    fastburn430 Member

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    He has one of the nicest neck pockets I have seen:

    [​IMG]
     
  13. unkindone

    unkindone Member

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    cool thanks everyone!

    the reason I didn't wanna bother don or his staff with this question is because I know hes busy...and something so subtle isn't a huge deal...just wondering what everyone thought of it is all :D looks like I will be vouching for a grosh after all :munch
     
  14. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    I haven't found a guitar with a different neck joint that sounds better than a Grosh. SRV's guitar had a standard neck-joint as did Jimi's.

    Suhr uses a standard neck joint as well though they do shave off some of the body to give you more neck access. Grosh accomplishes a similar thing by making the cutaway deeper.
     
  15. bbarnard

    bbarnard Member

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    As I indicated earlier (and I've sold my two Groshes so I can't look) but I believe that Don does the same thing but it is very subtle, probably not as shaved as a Suhr.
     
  16. Eagle1

    Eagle1 Member

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    Best neck joint on a strat style by far is the Anderson A wedgie (copy of the Parker night fly joint) the reason for this is it has no sides the whole contact point is effectively the base and subsequently held under pressure against the body with no possibility of sideways movement .Other advantages are great upper fret access machine bolts instead of wood screws and less possibility of cracking paint around the pocket as the wood is no longer cut thin hear.
    http://www.andersonguitars.com/questions.html
    :AOK
     

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