Grover locking tuners - cam stuck inside the string post?

gassyndrome

Member
Messages
1,554
Hi guys,

I have just run into a problem while restringing my Gibson Buckethead LP. One of the locking Grover rotomatic tuners is having an issue where the locking cam (which secures the string inside the post) is not opening, and opening or closing the thumbwheel has no effect.

There is no string caught in there, but it means I am now unable to lower the cam insert to put a string in there. I've tried every variation of winding/unwinding the thumbwheel to no avail. Super annoying and I have no idea how to try and fix this?!!

Has anyone run into this before and have a clever idea?

Cheers,
Simon.
 

Bazaboy33

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,011
Tap it gently with a rubber or plastic hammer, while supporting the headstock so as not to break it. This happened on my 2012 Trad Pro. So annoying, but easily fixed.
 

PAGK

Member
Messages
1
Hi guys,

I know this is an old post but I was wondering if the issue was solved?

I ran into the same problem this week and one of my grover 106C tuner got stuck.

Any avise will be highly appreciated.

Thanks!
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,987
loosen the thumbwheel all the way, smack the peghead against the palm of you hand a couple times to dislodge it.

if no luck, a sharp scriber point might serve to get in there and push it free.
 

Terry McInturff

45th Anniversary of guitar building!
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
7,538
Very often these "sticking pins" on rear-locking tuners is the result of "stiction" created by migrated oil on those mating surfaces.
Eliminating this problem is easily incorporated into a standard routine of "pre-treating" (prior to installation) any/all tuners as follows:
1) Remove the tuners from the packaging
2) Using a "guitar peg winder bit" in a drill, rotate each tuner for one minute...you are "lapping" the gears and getting them to run smoothly. Run them 30 seconds in either direction. Use a slow speed.
3) Use naphtha on a rag to completely remove all of the expelled oil from the exterior of the tuner. Do NOT soak the tuner in naphtha.
4) In the case of rear-locking tuners...introduce minute amounts of naptha or mineral spirits via syringe or pipette into the string-hole, in order to wash-away the film of oil/eliminate "stiction". *do not use soaking-levels of naptha/min spirits* The routine being one drop/massive compressed air/exersize the part.

We want to "run-in" the tuner's gears, whilst getting rid of the "stiction" associated with oil film/sticky locking pins....without redistributing the internal grease on the gears (outside of their realm)

IMO it's a good use of 15 minutes....easily incorporated into standard procedure.
Don't ever count on parts being 100%-to-standard out of the box
 
Last edited:

Chris Scott

Member
Messages
9,376
Very often these "sticking pins" on rear-locking tuners is the result of "stiction" created by migrated oil on those mating surfaces.
Eliminating this problem is easily incorporated into a standard routine of "pre-treating" (prior to installation) any/all tuners as follows:
1) Remove the tuners from the packaging
2) Using a "guitar peg winder bit" in a drill, rotate each tuner for one minute...you are "lapping" the gears and getting them to run smoothly. Run them 30 seconds in either direction. Use a slow speed.
3) Use naphtha on a rag to completely remove all of the expelled oil from the exterior of the tuner. Do NOT soak the tuner in naphtha.
4) In the case of rear-locking tuners...introduce minute amounts of naptha or mineral spirits via syringe or pipette into the string-hole, in order to wash-away the film of oil/eliminate "stiction". *do not use soaking-levels of naptha/min spirits* The routine being one drop/massive compressed air/exersize the part.

We want to "run-in" the tuner's gears, whilst getting rid of the "stiction" associated with oil film/sticky locking pins....without redistributing the internal grease on the gears (outside of their realm)

IMO it's a good use of 15 minutes....easily incorporated into standard procedure.
Don't ever count on parts being 100%-to-standard out of the box


Good point Terry. I always treat new tuners (mostly stamped units) like new shoes...run 'em in a while, and they loosen up a lot.

Some of the F-style saf-t-posts are murder fresh out of the blister pack. :eek:
 




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