Guitar Institutes>?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by y2stevo, Nov 10, 2004.


  1. y2stevo

    y2stevo Member

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    So whats the Dealeo with the Guitar Institutes? , or Institute?
    I don't know but I keep hearing things about all these great musicians coming our of them like gilbert,Dave Weiner (the guy that plays in the Steve Vai Band) etc.
    Theres a version of that or what seems to be in The UK called the Guitar institute Also.
    Just wondering anyone here ever been to One and what was it like.
    I'd really love to get into some sort of school or institute like that to expand my playing and grow as a musician as I'ts relly a passion of mine.

    Thoughts experience is greatly appreciated

    If you'd like heres the site for the UK one

    www.guitarinstitute.com

    :dude

    Cheers Guys
     
  2. Joe

    Joe Senior Member

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    Normally one or two year program that has no value towards getting your associates or bs degrees. Basically music only, where other music programs require you take math, English, etc...to fulfill the state's education standards for the given degree.

    You can meet a lot of cool people and improve your playing a lot, but it is a difficult avenue to success in a financial sense. To have a career as a guitar slinger you need to be in the right band or have your degree. Graduating from Berklee would open more gigs for you as a fill in, studio player or give you the opportunity to teach to fill in your income voids.

    I want to go to GIT someday, but just for fun.
     
  3. y2stevo

    y2stevo Member

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    Cheers.

    This one in the UK though seems to have Degrees and such.
    The Degree program requires a certain amount in Math and english etc also aswell as quiet a high standard of musical ability..
    But firstly you have to do the Diploma course so as to go on to the Degree.
    (I think)
     
  4. littlemoon

    littlemoon Member

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    GIT offers a bachelor's degree in music. The non-music courses are offered through MI's association with L.A. City College.

    littlemoon
     
  5. spaceboy

    spaceboy Member

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    no, you don't have to do the diploma - that's just one way to get in. the other would be with the relevant qualifications.... (i think :) )
     
  6. y2stevo

    y2stevo Member

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    "Entry Requirements
    Students should normally have:

    Five GCSE's grades A - C including Maths and English or equivalent.

    Two A Levels or equivalent or;

    The One Year Guitar Institute or Basstech TRAC Foundation in Popular Music Performance Diploma. We also normally expect:


    Grade 8 Performance standard

    Sight Reading at Grade 6*

    Music Theory at Grade 6*
    * These grades are guidelines only, applicants are not necessarily required to pass them.

    ""



    Spaceboy, I don't really understand the english school system at all, Could you expand a bit on those requirements

    Cheers Bro

    y2stevo
     
  7. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Member

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    I don't know what's up with M.I. these days, but I wouldn't trade my experience at the Los Angeles school in '84-'85 for anything in the world. At that time, there were no Degrees offered, only a "Certificate of Completion", which is what I have. I'm certainly not getting rich, but for what it is worth, my income is from music alone, and I can thank the G.I.T. curriculum and discipline for that. As with all things, you get out of it what you put into it. As for Degrees, I've never placed much stock in little pieces of paper, within the context of working in the real world. I resumed full time employment in music, largely due to the fact that the corporate world was not for me, after having milked it for all it was worth. But I didn't have a Degree when I climbed the traditional corporate ladder either. Make no mistake, there is certainly corporation in music. Employers mostly want to see whether or not you can do the job, and make them look good, and pull them out of the fire - regardless of the field of work; in point of fact, most insightful employers could not give a ratt's butt about Degrees. Of course, everything I've said would not apply for someone seeking a Professor gig.
     
  8. spaceboy

    spaceboy Member

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    right, well, GCSEs are equivelant to Standard Grades in scotland, and they're the first exams you take in school, starting them at about 14 and taking the exam at 16. You usually do 7-9 of the bastards. A levels (or Scottish highers, though A levels and highers are a bit different to eachother...) are taken from 16 to 18 and are what most Unis look at for qualifications. You'd only do 3-5 A levels/highers.

    so yeh, that's about it, don't know how it compares to ole eire (i'll have to ask my flatmate actually - or any of the other plethora of Irish folk at Dundee Uni! geez, the proportion of irish here is ridiculous! and fantastic of course :D

    ooh, then there's the grades...

    they are all based on the URL=http://www.abrsm.org/]ABRSM[/URL] grade standards. they do graded courses and exams in theory and sight reading as well as just about all classical instruments, and they are the universal standard for musical proficiency here. Course, they don't do anything rock-based, which is where the grade standards become a little unclear as all you can use is the various rock grade equivelants.

    rockschool is a great one (except for the lack of a Grade 7... most annoying when that seems to be about where i'm at now, and as most music degrees require grade 7 standard. poo)

    there ya go, hope that cleared some stuff up

    [EDIT] OR, you could do the diploma first, and i think that be all you need to get in, as well as the entrance exam thing.
     
  9. landru64

    landru64 Member

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    i hadn't heard of the guitar institute in the UK but i know it isn't part of MI. I'm wondering when MI is going to get their act together and challenge that name as a copyright violation. sure confuses me, and i bet a lot of customers.... uh.... like yourself! :D :D

    p.s. i went to and work for the LA Music Academy and there are lots of valuable things about going to a non-degree school, especially if you are not an academic type. it's a trade school although we are, like MI, accredited by NASM and considered an 'institution of higher learning.' But, really, folks, it's for practical learning. And let's remember; if you're a player, you're dealing with the practical a whole lot of the time. I actually have two degrees and went to LAMA afterwards and got a lot out of it. it's a killer school on a lot of levels.

    As for UK degrees, LAMA has a bit of a relationship with another UK school that offers a 'degree' called ACM (academy of contemporary music). You can go to ACM for a year and then LAMA for a year. You get a BA Hons. ('validated by middlesex univ.') which as far as I can tell isn't exactly an Oxford degree. It's a piece of paper that fulfills some governmental requirements, but when you look at the curriculum you actually go through, it's nothing like what a proper liberal arts degree is... in the states or for that matter probably in the UK.
     

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