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Guitar playing is so unfair

fenderlead

Member
Messages
4,642
When I hear EVH (try Brian May's Bluesbreaker) or George Lynch or Yngwie try to play the blues, well there are blues things in it but it's not what I would call their forte.
 

Neer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,764
Aren't we all, ultimately, despite any attempts to be somebody else? I'm just saying that "being himself" whilst playing blues just doesn't do it for me; it works for you, and that's cool, too. :)
It's not that it works for me, it's just that he is true to himself and not trying to be Albert King. When I was a kid, I thought I could play blues in a more interesting (to me at 12 y/o) way than all those old guys. :rollOK, I was a dopey kid--like Yngwie.
 

gearmeup

Member
Messages
1,254
That video was boring as hell. Who would want to cover a lame GNR song let alone watch some douch play it.
Dabbel tabs and covers but then be INOVATIVE!
 

Brutus

Member
Messages
3,614
That's how it is, some are born talented and if they put in the work they reach levels us mere mortals can't even touch.


That said, the video you linked to wasn't that good, penta wanking with some minor runs thrown in for good measure. And nowhere near as good as the small outro solo Slash does on the original IMO.

Set the bar higher. And work towards it in small steps.
Improvising like that guy does isn't hard at all really , it's all in the same key and just work on your licks and connect them, spend hours just noodling over songs, making up small melodies as you go. Make all the mistakes possible and make friends with your fretboard... :)
Practice uncovers what's already there. Just like digging a hole to find something. You may have to dig more than the next guy, and the difference between the effort and what you uncover may not be to your liking. That explains child prodigies. The treasure was close to the surface.
 

JonR

Member
Messages
15,678
Practice uncovers what's already there. Just like digging a hole to find something. You may have to dig more than the next guy, and the difference between the effort and what you uncover may not be to your liking. That explains child prodigies. The treasure was close to the surface.
That's a nice angle.
It fits with my belief that the "treasure" is there in all of us, at birth. Maybe slightly more in some than others, but not vastly different.
The sooner you dig, the easier it is to get it out. The longer you leave it, the more it gets buried by other stuff (whatever is more important for day to day living). It also starts to fade and tarnish a little, to degrade through disuse...
The differences between older people who start digging at the same age would be down to how good they are at digging... whether they get tired or bored before they hit paydirt. As well as, maybe, how much of that inborn treasure is still pure gold by the time they hit it.
Sometimes it just doesn't look like much, compared with how those who started younger have invested their treasure, earning interest on it all those years.
;)

Use it, or lose it, basically.
 

fenderlead

Member
Messages
4,642
That's a nice angle.
It fits with my belief that the "treasure" is there in all of us, at birth. Maybe slightly more in some than others, but not vastly different.
The sooner you dig, the easier it is to get it out. The longer you leave it, the more it gets buried by other stuff (whatever is more important for day to day living). It also starts to fade and tarnish a little, to degrade through disuse...
The differences between older people who start digging at the same age would be down to how good they are at digging... whether they get tired or bored before they hit paydirt. As well as, maybe, how much of that inborn treasure is still pure gold by the time they hit it.
Sometimes it just doesn't look like much, compared with how those who started younger have invested their treasure, earning interest on it all those years.
;)

Use it, or lose it, basically.
Amateur Youtube videos show some reality.

Some are alright and some are very good in a paint by numbers sort of way, but most are awful even if they have been playing for years and years, of course that's just my subjective opinion.

The players themselves might enjoy what they do, but to others (possible audience) it might be a different story.

I'm not talking about technique so much but more about musical personality.

If I see a new Django (not talking about Django's style or technique btw but more about musical personality) on Youtube I'll let the gear page know about it.

I have seen a Classical player that was very good and maybe excellent on Youtube and I found out later that they were already well known in the Classical world, go figure.
 
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JonR

Member
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15,678
Amateur Youtube videos show some reality.
Well, they show a moment in time... a stage in a continuing process.
Some are alright and some are very good in a paint by numbers sort of way, but most are awful even if they have been playing for years and years, of course that's just my subjective opinion.
I might agree, but we don't usually know how long any of them have been playing.
Also, the quality of playing (with a kid) might depend more on the kind of music they're copying, and the kind of encouragement or criticism they get, than any kind of aesthetic judgement by the kid.
It's common to see kids with impressive technique (fast), but little musicality - little awareness of expression, understanding, or control of tone. As adults we tend to appreciate the latter qualities at least as much as sheer technical skill, but it takes a while (and some growing up) to get to that.
The players themselves might enjoy what they do, but to others (possible audience) it might be a different story.
Sure. Kids especially enjoy all kinds of noises that adults will find painful! ;)
I'm not talking about technique so much but more about musical personality.
Right! That's a hard thing to spot in a kid, and quite rare. And then it depends on how we define "musical personality".
I'm guessing it would mean clear signs of musical invention and creativity, not just clever copying of a classic guitar solo.
If I see a new Django (not talking about Django's style or technique btw but more about musical personality) on Youtube I'll let the gear page know about it.
The funny thing there is that Django himself wasn't a "new" anything; he was just himself. Any "new Django" now is automatically inferior to Django by being comparable to him, by having adopted his stylings enough to be seen as a disciple or follower.
A true "new Django" would probably sound nothing like Django. Even if he played similar music, his style, technique and approach would be so unique you wouldn't think of comparing him to a past player.

Of course, that doesn't mean a new genius starts off fully-fledged, nothing like anyone else. When Bob Dylan first appeared, no doubt many called him the "new Woody Guthrie" or some such. But it quickly became apparent that that kind of description made no sense. He was unique. Following him, of course, you got many others being called "the new Dylan", and most didn't survive it. Some managed to dig their way out of it and become themselves (like Bruce Springsteen), some struggled (Donovan? Tom Petty?)

True genius - the way a very small number of artists get recognised as archetypes to which everyone following gets compared (Django, Dylan, Elvis, Beatles, etc) - is a combination of many things.
Whether or not there's something in the genes (and it's difficult to deny in such cases), there's certainly a particular attitude, a total self-belief and drive, mixed with an eclectic set of influences. Their much-vaunted "originality" is the result of stealing from a wide variety of sources, taking command of all that material and forging it how they like. They don't intend to become "original", they're just ultra-enthusiastic copyists, inspired by anything and everything. They go further, they go for longer, they take more.
I have seen a Classical player that was very good and maybe excellent on Youtube and I found out later that they were already well known in the Classical world, go figure.
Ha! :) Well that's a whole other issue!
That can be embarrassing.
"Hey, check out this fabulous unknown dude!"
"Er, yeah, actually they're already quite famous over here..."
We do tend to take our knowledge for granted, and the more we know, the more we tend to think we know all there is to know.

Even in the genre I like most (vintage blues), I still discover artists I've never heard of, 50 years after I started listening. Tunes too. (Willie Brown's "Mississippi Blues" was new to me a few months ago when I heard someone play it in a club; what a great tune! Then I discover it's supposedly a picking standard. Damn, how come I never got that memo? I better learn it! ;) (I did, btw, so now I know it, phew.))

I used to imagine that, one day, I would know everything. Duh! how naive is that! :jo :rolleyes:
 

fenderlead

Member
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4,642
The funny thing there is that Django himself wasn't a "new" anything; he was just himself. Any "new Django" now is automatically inferior to Django by being comparable to him, by having adopted his stylings enough to be seen as a disciple or follower.
A true "new Django" would probably sound nothing like Django. Even if he played similar music, his style, technique and approach would be so unique you wouldn't think of comparing him to a past player.
Yeah, that's what I meant, someone who seemed unique and couldn't be compared to anyone else much at all, but that's all pretty indefinable and you just know it when you hear it.
 

fenderlead

Member
Messages
4,642
I'm ok in saying this kid is a prodigy. To me this is common sense. Very rare, absolutely. I bet 99.99% of my favorite musicians weren't "prodigies". Anyhow, this is very different than the little girl shredder videos.

https://www.thegearpage.net/board/index.php?threads/1378155

He is something else.

He has some ways to go and no one really knows what sort of musical personality he's really got at the moment and what he may produce in the future but he's well on his way.


 




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