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Guitar stringing question...

billyg121

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,315
i saw a thread a while back,were someone posted a diagram about the best way to restring a guitar to prevent string slipage.i have some slight tuning issues.you would think after 25 years of playing guitar,that i would know how to string my guitar,but this could actually be the source of my problems.thanks for any info.
 

tartanphantom

Member
Messages
743
Is this what you're looking for? I've been wrapping my strings like this for several years now with no problems.

 

redroos

Member
Messages
87
Yeah - there it is. The worst way to put a string on an ELECTRIC or STEEL STRING acoustic guitar that I have ever run into. I am very sure this ranks up there with super gluing the lug nuts on your car wheels.

Where this method fails is not in performing its task, (because it really does anchor a string on the tuner!!!), but in making the NEXT RESTRING so damn hard that most people go much longer than they should. ..Which is fine if you are after dead string tone, sure.

At best, I am pretty sure this method was 'discovered' in use on NYLON stringed instruments (where it actually works very well, and DOES NOT discourage restrings because the nylon string is very flexable) and then passed on to steel string instruments by an idiot of HUGE MAGNATUDE!! Seriously, try to take a set of strings off a guitar that has been strung up this way. Here is where the expression 'bleed like a stuck pig' really comes home I think, because you will surely stab yourself as you wrestle these strings off. And then, after you've been stuck a few times, you will move on to needle nose pliers (or using your side cutters) and run the risk of gouging/scratching the tuner or even the headstock. Why? :bonk

OK, rant over. There are locking tuners for people who think their clams are made by bad tuning caused by string slippage. And while its true there are many people out there who could use a course in restringing, don't look to this stringing method for the solution.
 

TFC

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
656
Couldn't you just add a little more length to the end and then fold down the pointy part so it isn't pointy any more? Anyway, I string my strat like this and have impaled myself once or twice, but it's no big deal and not a deterrent at all.
 

Jef Bardsley

Member
Messages
2,951
I totally agree with redroos. Martin guitars are strung like this at the factory, and after all these years, I still poke myself on the first restring. And it's unnecessary. Run the first wrap over, and the rest under. The capstan shape of the post will cause the wraps to pinch the string end where it pokes through, and you only need a few wraps underneath. (You can trust me on this, "restring guitars" is part of my job description. ;) )

The important part is properly stretching the strings afterward, and there was a good post on that a while back.
 

Arjan

Member
Messages
298
I totally agree with redroos. Martin guitars are strung like this at the factory, and after all these years, I still poke myself on the first restring. And it's unnecessary. Run the first wrap over, and the rest under. The capstan shape of the post will cause the wraps to pinch the string end where it pokes through, and you only need a few wraps underneath. (You can trust me on this, "restring guitars" is part of my job description. ;) )

The important part is properly stretching the strings afterward, and there was a good post on that a while back.
Strange... I've been using the method posted earlier for restringing my electrics for years and I never had any problem. Maybe it just takes some getting used to? What I like about this method is that you can reduce the number of wraps around the tuning peg, resulting in less slack when stretching and ultimately a more stable tuning. IMHO, YMMV.

I fully agree on the string stretching, that really make a huge difference.
 

Rosewood

Member
Messages
1,862
I've been using this method in my shop for at least 30 years and never had a problem, it's not that complicated.
 

nmiller

Drowning in lap steels
Messages
7,451
I haven't tried this method, but I definitely will. I'm imagining how taking off the string would work, and I see no reason why it should be a hassle. It should be the reverse of winding it, which is what I do already.
 

aiq

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
11,178
3 x 3:

Top three:
hole (or slot) 45 degrees to nut, inside to outside.
contact point on string appox. 1" beyond post
string thru hole, around to inside, under then over, forming a loop
tighten allowing wraps to form under string, about 2 wraps
tune, pull..repeat until pitch holds.
trim with 2"slack. trim to desired length next day

reverse for bottom three.

straight pull, all as top three.

locks as Martin method but prettier and easier to remove.
 
Messages
11,596
i wrap the string three times around the post. tune up, stretch, tune up.

if you're having tuning issues, it's likely the string binding at the nut.
 

Last

Member
Messages
4,279
If you play DR Blues Strings they recommend that you DO NOT Stretch the Strings while installing. It can actually lead to less usable lifetime of the strings.

I found it odd but sure enough works great! Whereas before I actually read the directions printed inside the box of each set I wondered why my strings went dead so quickly.

Now they last MUCH longer & stay in tune for days with a fair amount of playing them each day.

YMMV
 

trazan

Member
Messages
816
I've been using this method in my shop for at least 30 years and never had a problem, it's not that complicated.
Yep, I've been doing it this way for 20 years with absolutely no issues. Makes restringing difficult? C'mon, how hard can it be? Set the tuning peg so that the hole goes parallel to the neck, insert the string on the far side and pull as much of the string through without using force. I end up with approx one turn around the peg. No tuning issues and no problem changing strings.
 

Flyin' Brian

Member
Messages
30,306
Yep, I've been doing it this way for 20 years with absolutely no issues. Makes restringing difficult? C'mon, how hard can it be? Set the tuning peg so that the hole goes parallel to the neck, insert the string on the far side and pull as much of the string through without using force. I end up with approx one turn around the peg. No tuning issues and no problem changing strings.
I think the difficulty people are talking about is getting the strings off when restringing.
 
Messages
8,093
Most have their own silly rituals with restringing and their religious fervor in defense of it. I have always installed plain (unwound) strings with the above illustrated locking method and am familiar with unstringing to the point where it is not a problem for me. I employ it because the string absolutely, positively will not slip, and it results in minimal winds around the post.

As a "professional restringer" (thirty years gtr tech), the one I hate is when someone has put the string through the hole twice!!! It's as if they are worried a thief will break into their house and steal the strings off the gtr. Practicianers of this method should be shot! Twice!!
 

poolshark

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,244
I really don't get the 'locking' string fetish most people have. It's a pain (for me) to do and undo, and it introduces a lot of extra string coils to stretch out; plus, it still doesn't solve a poorly cut nut, which is the source of most tuning issues. Upon restringing, I pull the string straight through the tuner, then crank 'til it's in tune. Stretch, repeat, stretch, repeat, done. Because the rest of my guitar (read: THE NUT) functions as it should, I have no tuning issues.

I say again, a badly cut nut is usually the biggest source of tuning issues. Take care of your nuts, people.
 

cvansickle

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
12,342
I lock-wrap my plain strings, but just wind three coils under the wrapped strings. Tuning stays put just fine.
 
Messages
2,176
Yeah - there it is. The worst way to put a string on an ELECTRIC or STEEL STRING acoustic guitar that I have ever run into. I am very sure this ranks up there with super gluing the lug nuts on your car wheels.

Where this method fails is not in performing its task, (because it really does anchor a string on the tuner!!!), but in making the NEXT RESTRING so damn hard that most people go much longer than they should. ..Which is fine if you are after dead string tone, sure.
I can change strings using the method shown on the graphic in five minutes or less on most guitars.

I use a string winder and a small set of wire cutters. To remove the old string from the tuning peg, cut the string at the first fret, and pull on the short piece of string; with a minimum of twisting and pulling the string will come right out. The need to cut the old string when removing it stems from restringing guitars with tremolo units where the string has to be cut to pass backwards through the string holes in the trem.
 

Tinman

Member
Messages
1,946
At best, I am pretty sure this method was 'discovered' in use on NYLON stringed instruments (where it actually works very well, and DOES NOT discourage restrings because the nylon string is very flexable) and then passed on to steel string instruments by an idiot of HUGE MAGNATUDE!!
Dan Erlewine uses this method on electric steel string guitars. He's a pretty good tech.
 




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