Guitar+Vocals in home/practice setting

llocust

Member
Messages
16
I've been running an SM-58 mic into a converter plugged into the clean channel of my 70's Deluxe Reverb amp and my guitar into the reverb channel as a way to sing and play at home for a long time now.

As I look around for another amp, I'm wondering if I need to look only at two-channel amps. What other modest-investment approaches can be used to amplify vocals and guitar at home? I do have a RS 4-channel mixer (hi-Z inputs) if I need to blend a guest guitarist or second mic but haven't had the need for it lately.
 

strumminsix

Member
Messages
4,257
Check it out: Fender Acoustasonic and a modeler like SansAmp or pod or something.

I've used this with decent results as I need to work on singing with my face in a mic while playing more difficult tunes.
 

re-animator

Senior Member
Messages
8,240
vocals and tube amps aren't a good mix.

the best solution i've had is using a pod x3 into some monitors. X3 has separate inputs (and independent channels) for guitar and vox. sounds pretty good.
 

stevel

Member
Messages
15,077
I've been running an SM-58 mic into a converter plugged into the clean channel of my 70's Deluxe Reverb amp and my guitar into the reverb channel as a way to sing and play at home for a long time now.

As I look around for another amp, I'm wondering if I need to look only at two-channel amps. What other modest-investment approaches can be used to amplify vocals and guitar at home? I do have a RS 4-channel mixer (hi-Z inputs) if I need to blend a guest guitarist or second mic but haven't had the need for it lately.
Realistically, you shouldn't run vocals through a guitar amp. It's not that it's "bad" or that it "can't be done", but you're asking your amp to do twice as much work, which sacrifices clarity, and you're singing through speaker sizes that aren't as effective for vocals.

The best thing to do, if you want to keep it REAL simple (and cheap), is to go out and get a little powered monitor, or small P.A. type powered speaker cabinet that accepts XLR input from the 58 (and that you can plug your mixer into).

http://www.sweetwater.com/c134--Active_Powered_PA_Speakers/low2high

Then you can have 2 vocal mics, and if you want, mic up two guitars as well. Then later, you can go out and buy another powered speaker cabinet, and can go out and play some gigs.

Best,
Steve
 

llocust

Member
Messages
16
Realistically, you shouldn't run vocals through a guitar amp. It's not that it's "bad" or that it "can't be done", but you're asking your amp to do twice as much work, which sacrifices clarity, and you're singing through speaker sizes that aren't as effective for vocals.

The best thing to do, if you want to keep it REAL simple (and cheap), is to go out and get a little powered monitor, or small P.A. type powered speaker cabinet that accepts XLR input from the 58 (and that you can plug your mixer into).

http://www.sweetwater.com/c134--Active_Powered_PA_Speakers/low2high

Then you can have 2 vocal mics, and if you want, mic up two guitars as well. Then later, you can go out and buy another powered speaker cabinet, and can go out and play some gigs.

Best,
Steve
Good suggestion. I should mention that practice includes wifey on the drums, so I do need a bit of vocal amplification to get into the room mix.
 






Trending Topics

Top