Guitars in case, store it horizontally (not flat)?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by rsm, Dec 28, 2016.

  1. icr

    icr Member

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    For correct storage of electric guitars you need a compass (or iPhone app). The magnetic field of the pickup needs to be aligned with the earth's True North, otherwise your pickups will become inactive. This is true, several people told me...
     
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  2. icr

    icr Member

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    I was also told that, for a good night sleep, keep at least two electrics under the bed. Stacked on each other. This way you can avoid this potential sleep-depriving situation.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Scott L

    Scott L Silver Supporting Member

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    This works for me....

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Starshine

    Starshine Member

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    There's a reason Fender calls them closet classics and not under the bed classics. I mean, it's probably because it sounds better, but who knows?
     
  5. JefeMaximo

    JefeMaximo Huge Member Silver Supporting Member

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    I only store mine in a zero-gravity chamber.
     
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  6. edro

    edro Member

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    If it ain't broke.... :)
     
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  7. rsm

    rsm Member

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    Good to see you ask others who may know more than you as well...at first, given what you chose to quote from me, I initially thought you knew everything instinctively. For those of us who don't know everything instinctively, we try to learn from the experience and knowledge of others...so we may have to ask questions from time to time.

    YMMV
     
  8. CassetteTape

    CassetteTape Member

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    Old post, but checking the action with guitar on it's side in playing position is probably because the strings could sag slightly toward the fretboard when on it's back, so when measuring action to thousandth's of an inch, the most accurate would be to have it on it's side so strings sags sideways instead of toward fretboard.

    I can't see any issue with storing a guitar laying down/face up if there is nothing crushing the case and it's in a properly designed hard case.

    As for facing guitars magnetic north... single coils could face either direction, you'd have to test the pickups to know which you have - south facing strings or north facing string polarity on your pickups. If you have a reverse wound middle pickup, you'd have a mix of both. Humbucking pickups have a mix of both in the same pickup, right next to each other, so to think that magnetic north would have any affect is pretty funny.
     
  9. stickyFingerz

    stickyFingerz Supporting Member

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    I'd think that would be to account for gravity's pull on the strings rather than the neck.
     
  10. Frozen Rat

    Frozen Rat Gold Supporting Member

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    You're over thinking this, but since we are overthinking this, let's REALLY over think it.

    So, when you're not sure about something of this nature, try to work your way through it logically.

    1) The guitar is supported on all sides in the case plus top to bottom.
    2) It is supported by a material that will take some impact.
    3) Gravity is weak over short distances—just don't give it time to accelerate a mass, that's when it's dangerous.
    4) If the guitar is structurally sound, how could a weak pull of gravity do damage if it's not even a moving mass?

    The damage occurs when you drop the case from enough height for gravity to work up enough acceleration to cause damage inside due to the force imparted when the mass wants to keep moving but cannot, and any weak spots give out first from being overwhelmed.

    A guitar case standing straight up and falling right over to the floor follows an arc that is longer than the case is tall. If I were get into the trig here, I'd tell you that, when standing straight up the arc from the tip of the case to the floor is a quarter of the circumference of a circle (90 degrees) that has a radial length equal to the length of the guitar case, so the equation of the arc should be x=2piR*.25. If the guitar case were 48" then we're talking about a fall for the very top of 301.9"/4, which is an arc length of 75.4". The base of the guitar case acts like a fulcrum and moves almost no distance. The top of the case hits quite hard because it just travelled 1.57 times it's height to the floor. But how fast was it moving when it hit? That's the key, as acceleration plays a big part in force. The equation is f-mt (force equals mass times acceleration).

    We'd need algebra to figure out its velocity. I think the formula is v=v0+g*t. I end up with v=0+.6233*32.174, which works out to 20.054 feet per second to fall through that 75.4" arc and hit the floor. Now, that formula is for falling straight down, but I imagine falling through an arc would take longer since gravity wouldn't be pulling straight down the whole time, rather it would be pulling at various vectors all the way down, and therefore I think it would take longer than .6223 of a second. I'll cheat and say it takes 1.57 times longer since that's how much longer the arc is than straight down, which works out to almost 1 second, which increases the velocity at .0000001" before you hit the floor at closer to 32 feet per second.

    If the mass of the top of that guitar case is 3 lbs, then we can finally figure out the force. F=3lb*32, resulting in 96 pounds of force impacting the top of that guitar case.

    That being the case, I'd say that laying the cases flat is smarter than upright due to them having less distance to fall and create the kind of forces that can snap a headstock inside a case.

    I apologize in advance if I got any of this wrong. It's pretty basic stuff though so I don't think I got too far out on a limb here.
     
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  11. pinfloi

    pinfloi Member

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    Except for John Mayer Silver Sky, that shall be facing South
     
  12. Richard Guy

    Richard Guy Member

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    With hollowbody guitars, be sure to address proper humidity, especially in the Winter-time, dry air is not a good thing

    Remove any 'dry packets' that are found inside cases. They will remove moisture in the air. Throw them away, ... I can't believe that folks even add more!
     
  13. Oldschool59

    Oldschool59 Member

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    To a point. But gravity affects everything, and the neck is cantilevered, while the string is supported at two ends. Both will deflect under gravity. Ultimately, it is the net effect on the distance between the string bottom and the fret top that is of interest here.
     
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  14. ant_riv

    ant_riv Supporting Member

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    On occasion, I have accidentally stored some standing on their headstock, instead of body down.
    I have never had an issue with these, either, and one was a Fender 12-string.
     

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