Gypsy Jazz?

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by JackButler, Feb 7, 2008.


  1. JackButler

    JackButler Supporting Member

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    Been looking for a Classical around $500, then realized I've never tried a GYpsy style guitar!
    How do they differ? I know nothing about them.
    Sorta looking at those Gotanos MF sells for $400.
    Thanks
     
  2. EunosFD

    EunosFD Member

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    I've been kinda thinking about these lately too (I'm guessing you're referring to the Macafferri-style guitars). Well, the Gitane line anyway; particularly the John Jorgenson models. Some of them have longer 26.5" scale lengths & nice wide, chunky necks both of which really appeal to me. I'm curious about opinions as well. How well do they work as regular ol' acoustic guitars?
     
  3. Telecaster

    Telecaster Member

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  4. JackButler

    JackButler Supporting Member

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    So lots diff than a regular one?
     
  5. ricoh

    ricoh Member

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    I recently traded back a Dell Arte' to Buffalo Bros through their 100% trade back policy. Although the guitar was built superbly, I never really played it much. They are built more like classical guitars and the strings are special to the guitar. They are not silk and steel like I used to think.
    The tone is unique to the style of guitar. I did attempt some Django stylings but wound up incorporating what I learned into my own style.
    Homespun offers lessons by Paul Mehling that are very good. The style is very linear and draws from arpeggios, chromaticism and "ornamental flourishes. I have played the National Style 0 more than the Dell Arte' I traded back already!!! I am not good at describing different tonal qualities but if you have an interest then check out some of the less expensive models. I believe Django's guitar was made of ply not solid tone wood so you will be in good company with a less $$$ model!!!!! Django's original compositions have always affected me more than the standards he romped through.The original recording of Nuages is a favorite.
     
  6. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    I have a Django-style guitar made by Shelley Park up in Vancouver (extremely highly recommended). From my experience with that and from test driving some others, they are different from what you think of as normal acoustic, but incredibly hip.

    The guitars are built incredibly light - not big and heavily braced. So the guitar feels like it wants to explode - you play one note on one string and all the other strings with sympathetic harmonics start ringing too. The other neat thing about them is that they seem to have 2 entirely different voices. Play lightly, the guitar sings sweetly, then you bear down and it sort of makes a quantum jump to a big ballsy tone - not a subtle shift between the voices.

    The strings are hard to come by, silver plated on copper is the weirdness. And they tend to be very light - 10s or 11s, anything heavier the guitar will collapse.

    The Park is my only real acoustic and that's what I use, and I don't play Gypsy style at all. It's a great voice and very seductive for almost any style. It screams on slide too, for what that's worth.

    So if you're looking for a Martin/Guild/Taylor replacement, don't bother with them. But otherwise, give one a test drive - you might fall in love with it.
     
  7. wbm68

    wbm68 Member

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    To answer your question, the scale length is different.
    If you want to use a pick, you generally want more tension on the strings than if you finger pick classical style.
     

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