GZ34 Help

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by babyslapmafro, Dec 17, 2009.


  1. babyslapmafro

    babyslapmafro Member

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  2. Timbre Wolf

    Timbre Wolf GoldMember Supporter Gold Supporting Member

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    That '62 f32 GZ34 is an excellent rectifier choice. But the price, while "decent" for a collector (who'll also be gleaning value from gazing at the box), can be beat for a player's tube. The box, packaging, and print all will run you about $100 more than the price of buying a used one that tests new.

    - Thom
     
  3. Tele71

    Tele71 Gold Supporting Member

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    Thats a pretty nice looking tube. Mullard makes pretty stout GZ34s. He says it tests Very Strong but not new. That's kind of weird but if it's new and "unused" like the seller states the $ isn't to out of line for what these things are going for these days. I don't buy tubes off ebay any longer. To many misrepresentations for me. The best way i have found to buy tubes new production or NOS is from a reputable dealer. There are a few that hang out here and I know a guy that I get ALL my NOS tubes from exclusively these days. I've been burned too many times to buy from anyone else. One thing is for sure if you get a real mullard it will be worth the price both in sound quality and longevity. Good Luck.
    Paul
     
  4. Hand of Doom

    Hand of Doom Member

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    Lightly used from a reputable dealer is the way to go. The Mullard will last a good long while and it plays/feels great.
     
  5. Groberts

    Groberts Silver Supporting Member

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    Is there any sonic difference between the Mullard 4 notch versus the one with 7 or more notches?
     
  6. Timbre Wolf

    Timbre Wolf GoldMember Supporter Gold Supporting Member

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    Uh... the 4-notch are a little smoother...:eek:

    Actually, I don't have any 7-notch, so I have not compared. Anyone else?

    - T
     
  7. Griz

    Griz Member

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    It's a very durable rectifier tube. I've got one in a '91 Fender RI '59 Bassman. Still going strong after 18 years. So as another poster indicated, a used one in good performing condition is also likely a pretty safe bet.
     
  8. zombiwoof

    zombiwoof Supporting Member

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    I still have the stock Mullard 5AR4/GZ34 rec in my original '65 Princeton Reverb. Works great after 44 years of use.

    Al
     
  9. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    how do you know if a tube was only used lightly? A promise???
     
  10. tejastubes

    tejastubes Member

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    Yes a very good price, but what level of service/screening are you getting? The tube is a 1962 made and will last quite a while. Used tested and properly screened tubes are good values as well, but if all you are wanting is lowest price, then go to eBay and take your chances,,,you will eventually find out that the test equipment used and its accuracy fluctuates quite a bit.

    Perhpas, but the price of Mullard GZ34 have gone through the roof so it is hard to say that its $100 more. In this example I would say its more of an issue of reliability and knowing the seller.

    the early 1950's F31 versions are the best.

    There are various things to llok for and you can perfeorm a cathode activity test to evalutae the condition of the cathode which usually is a good indicator of tube life and how much it was used. Although, I must say thet Mullard cathode construction was amazing so you could have one of these in service for 30-40 years depending on how much you use the amp.
     
  11. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    So you'd guarantee it for 30-40 years?
     
  12. Timbre Wolf

    Timbre Wolf GoldMember Supporter Gold Supporting Member

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    Well, I don't think they're early-'50s... perhaps you meant late-'50s/early-'60s?

    Dutch Philips mid-'50s metal band base are highly regarded. I like later-'50s Sittard, 'cause they sound as good, and don't cost you as many gold bars. If we are in agreement about which versions are our favorite, Josh, then the true answer to the 4-notch vs. 7-notch question is neither - go for the non-notched plates ;)

    Cheers!

    - T
     
  13. jcs

    jcs Member

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    Take a look at the getter flashing thru a light, if you can easily see thru it with a lot of thin brown appearance, it is getting worn.

    A healthier tube will have a thick silverish flashing that is hard to see light thru.

    Otoh, i have seen very worn examples of Mullard and others that still test strong and sound punchy and dynamic as well, this demonstrates, imo, how well the original production of these 'holy grail' tubes were built.

    You have to remember, tubes were developed 'very well' early in the 1900s (300B Westinghouse anyone) and were fully developed by the 1950s for the most part and ONLY THEN did production/need start winding down by the early 1960s with SS technology taking hold.

    If folks will grasp and fully understand the importance of vacuum tubes in modern culture thru the 1900s,possibly we wouldnt have these repeated questions over why they are considered to be the pinnacle of quality versus new production.
     

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