Have you ever bought a beautiful guitar but felt it wasn't very good?

HTSMetal

Member
Messages
1,671
That's very unusual for an MIJ Ibanez. I have played many of them and have never come across one with serious QC issues. Maybe we have different standards.
I was a constant Ibanez player for about the first ten years of learning guitar -- had an SZ320, an MIJ RG550, a couple Soundgear basses and really loved them all.

The bridge post problem was the biggest issue and one that seems fairly common on basswood bodied Ibanez guitars with Edge Pro trems from what I was able to glean across guitar forums and Ibanez Rules, regardless of country of manufacture. This thing was bought brand new and you could literally shake the studs back and forth in the rout with your hand, it was just terrible.
 

claudel

Member
Messages
6,775
Why would a person buy a guitar that "wasn't good"?
I thought strings & setup would cure the thuddy vague articulation on the blonde "P" ( usually does ), but it was just not very toneful.

It was actually relatively quite light as well.

Probably found a good home as a wall hanger.
 

Albion9

Member
Messages
976
Sometimes guitars are a lot like women. The really great looking ones will just lay there and do nothing for you and the so-so/average ones will rock you all night.

Hear that in your mind as if Jack Handey were speaking to you.
 

xmusic123

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
300
All. The. Time. In my years of buying/selling/trading the main thing I’ve learned is that looks have nothing to do with whether a guitar is good. Most of my non cool looking guitars are the ones I like most.

Although my Artinger is both a piece of art and the one of the best guitar I’ve ever played. But my Strat and LP are “better” guitars and don’t look nearly as pretty.
 

Platevolt

Member
Messages
1,070
I thought strings & setup would cure the thuddy vague articulation on the blonde "P" ( usually does ), but it was just not very toneful.

It was actually relatively quite light as well.

Probably found a good home as a wall hanger.
P?
 

monty

Member
Messages
25,354
Yeah, my long gone Paisley Tele (NOT the BP Tele I got a couple months ago, that thing is awesome!!).
The other one was pure eye-candy even my girl was in love with it but I had to get rid of it after a couple months because it was a lifeless anchor. Still sad about that, lol.
 

MuzicToyz

Member
Messages
257
Flame, gold, and engraving has no added benefit to tone or playability - Only the price tag. And in my case if I have a flawless beauty or a beat up workhorse that play and sound equal I will always grab the the workhorse and leave the stress of a scratch on the wall.
 

hippieboy

Member
Messages
11,729
All. The. Time. In my years of buying/selling/trading the main thing I’ve learned is that looks have nothing to do with whether a guitar is good. Most of my non cool looking guitars are the ones I like most.

Although my Artinger is both a piece of art and the one of the best guitar I’ve ever played. But my Strat and LP are “better” guitars and don’t look nearly as pretty.

I'm learning this too hehe.
 

seward

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,874
I had beautiful guitars that I didn't know how to use, but that's not the same thing.
 

Dave Locher

Member
Messages
649
When I was 17 in the early '80s my parents bought me a beautiful import Les Paul copy. I stared at it a lot. It was a horrible guitar. Weak pickups, crappy tuners, and frets that seemed to be brass - they were so soft you could dig grooves in them by pressing too hard on the strings. So I learned very early that good looks do not mean quality!
 

hippieboy

Member
Messages
11,729
When I was 17 in the early '80s my parents bought me a beautiful import Les Paul copy. I stared at it a lot. It was a horrible guitar. Weak pickups, crappy tuners, and frets that seemed to be brass - they were so soft you could dig grooves in them by pressing too hard on the strings. So I learned very early that good looks do not mean quality!

A valuable lesson!
 

HesNot

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,535
I guess I've been lucky - I don't think I've ever owned a dog guitar. I've had a number that I didn't bond with for one reason or another ... but it wasn't until I'd played it a good bit to realize they just weren't working or inspiring to me. I've also only bought one guitar without playing it - but I knew the specs would work and I could resell without taking a haircut if I really didn't like it. It's probably my favorite guitar...

I like the aesthetics of all my guitars including at least one whose aesthetics would not have been my first choice but that plays so well I've come to love the aesthetics (NGD post coming soon...) .
 

claudel

Member
Messages
6,775
Absolutely stunning genuine '58 Pbass

Blonde. maple neck, anodized pickguard

All show, little go unless one wanted a thud machine.

Glad I could return it, it was expensive...

I thought strings & setup would cure the thuddy vague articulation on the blonde "P" ( usually does ), but it was just not very toneful.

It was actually relatively quite light as well.

Probably found a good home as a wall hanger.

You missed my first poast...
 

Strummerfan

Member
Messages
7,600
I would rather have a great sounding, great playing, ugly guitar than a beautiful crappy guitar. Luckily there are plenty out there that are both good looking and good playing guitars.

My #2 is ugly, but man it plays nice.
 

budg

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,572
I’ve had just as many ugly dogs as good looking dogs. Eye candy doesn’t really factor into why a guitar is a dog . Just in Les Paul’s , a plain Jane tribute, Epi silverburst custom , Gibby Traditional with a AA top were equally dogs. 335 figured natural and Les paul Goldtop are the best of the best . Not seeing the point of the thread tbh.
 

Steadfastly

Member
Messages
4,993
I feel a lot of people are more incline to make a great player out of a beautiful guitar than out of a more common/plain/boring one, have you ever encountered a beautiful dog?? hehe

Just curious.
If it was, I would never buy it. Why would anyone in their right mind buy it if they intended to play it? It is just not reasonable.
 

SwissPicks

Member
Messages
42
As a set up guy of 27 years... Guitars are all individual. Looks have nothing to do with playability and the straightness of the neck. What some may not know is that major guitar companies only dry out the neck wood to 40 or 50%. That's alot of moisture trapped in there and you won't know know where the neck will sit for a couple of years until it dries out. Which brings me to Tom Anderson Guitarworks. Because they make a few guitars a day, they dry the neck wood out to 8%. Hence, they're pin straight and rigid for life. I was a dealer and owned a bunch of 'em.. It's tough to do things correctly when the production numbers are so high with the bigger brands. PRS gets my vote for overall consistency.
 




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