Having terrible trouble with my TONE!!!!!!

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by mxandmyax, Dec 18, 2009.


  1. mxandmyax

    mxandmyax Member

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    I have been very happy with my tones for the most part. I recently Have been running ears though, Mic'd in an iso box.

    I'm runnin a 76 335 through a mogami to a eb vpjr, fulldrive 2, trex moller, zia drive, fuzz factory, zendrive, pog, timefactor, canari cable to the dr z rt 66 to the 1x12 with a tonker, mic'd with a d3 to a passive split to the foh midas venis board... running a jbl prx rig....

    I get a sound I love, then mic it up, box it (we have smarted the mic with and without the box... I stays pretty damn flat besides a 1 or 2 db 3 to 500 boost) I don't run any of my pedals with a tone knob up or anything. But I get so lost in the ear mix once the vocals come in that to cut I'm having to thin out my tone midset! Then the sound guy comes up to me after the show and tells me my tone got thin and buzzy as the night went along.

    Also, I used to run a very clean amp and run my overdrive pedals with the drive up to get a really smooth sound... But recently I have been trying to get it to sound crunchy so I have been going the amp barely breaking up with the drive on the pedal almost all the way down... Don't know if this has anything to do with it cutting..

    I really enjoy dark, crunchy tones, Play pop rock, and can't figure out how to hear myself, have thick tone, and still hear the vocals! Killing me!

    Please throw some advice my way!
     
  2. pete kanaras

    pete kanaras Member

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    lose the dirt pedals, ALL of them, turn the amp Up and control your clean to dirty level with your volume pedal. that amp was made to be thick and clean sounding, with a very thick midrange and dark crunch of the godz when wound up. i own a d3 and love and recommend it for guitar cabs. but maybe try changing the mic to one that has very little proximity effect when jammed up that close to a speaker (iow an omni) and Don't smart pro it. i have a feeling a great omni with a slightly rounded off top end will be a big improvement and give you a rounder, less spiky tone. seems to me that five or six (!) different dirt pedals have taken away all the personality of your guitar and amp. you can find the dirt and crunch in your hands; right now you're using thin and buzzy sounding dirt pedals as the foundation of your entire sound on the front end, and your amp is barely breaking up. yet you want dark crunchy tones. that's exactly what a route 66 was Made for, so turn that sucker up! let the amp work for you, because you have an ideal situation for getting real power tube sweat and grunt at controllable foh volumes. no pedal on earth can give you that tone. mildly compress/limit at foh if need be, and at the foh guy's discretion, since he's in the ideal position to make make that call. sounds like you already have a good relationship going with them.
     
  3. Plague Dog

    Plague Dog Member

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    Just scrap everything and start from scratch... That's what I do :stir
     
  4. mxandmyax

    mxandmyax Member

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    Alright... let's officially turn this into an "everything for sale thread" hahaha. Thank you both for the replys! Keep em coming.
     
  5. mxandmyax

    mxandmyax Member

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  6. Thames

    Thames Member

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  7. chaos

    chaos Member

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    That's just the way it is.

    That doesn't mean that you have to go withou the distortion, but you have to realize it doesn't cut through the mix. Since you have a sound guy - use him!

    If you are getting good tones the way you want, but it just isn't cutting in your monitor, then have the sound guy give you a bit more guitar in your monitor and trust that he will appropriately boost your guitar in the mix. If you have good tone and he is dealing with it don't undermine your tone and his work to make it cut.

    If the sound guy feels that your starting tone isn't working, then my suggestion is to deal back the distortion - not necessaril all the wy, but experiment with more boost and less distortion.

    Final thought is that you got quite a bit in your signal chain, maybe experiment with getting some of those on a true bypass loop or experimenting with different order of effects?

    Chaos
     
  8. dets1

    dets1 Member

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    my two cents- listen to pete and dump your pedals. push the amp and it will sing.
     
  9. lefty kwan

    lefty kwan Member

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    I've been experimenting with an ISO box at home lately, for recording and to save my wife and son from the 50 watt Marshall.

    I get a sound I love, then mic it up, box it -this might be the problem.
    When I did this the tone didn't translate to my studio speakers( in your case stage monitors). I was thinking it was the mike placement and the acoustics of the ISO box itself. I first messed with the mike position till I was happy, then I messed with the amps EQ settings as well as gain settings. The settings on the amp ended up being drastically different inside the ISO box than playing without the ISO box. In the end I'm able to get a really good cranked Marshall tone out of my studio monitors without blowing the walls down...happy days for everyone.
     
  10. stevel

    stevel Member

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    This is your problem.

    You're changing your tone because of the vocals in your in ears. Can you get a separate monitor mix for you in-ears? That way you can keep your sound where you want it and keep the vocals in just enough for reference.

    Also, think about what your amp sounds like inside that box. Imagine if you had to have your head inside that box while you played. It won't sound the same as out of the box. Too much SPL for the mic.

    Why are you using an iso box to begin with? Musicians are so insane. We play so loud that we have to isolate everything. It's ridiculous. If people played at *reasonable* levels, music would be much more organic.

    Good Luck,
    Steve
     

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