Heard a clip of my FOH sound, meh.

amstrtatnut

Member
Messages
14,231
This is pretty much directed at people who DONT use IEMs.

I think I had too much treble dialed on my lead tone. It wasnt ice pick but wasnt fat sounding, which is what it sounded like on stage.

I think I made the mistake of dialing my tone without hearing it out front. I have a wireless and should have hopped off stage and should 20 feet in front of my rig.

How do you dial your sound so you know what FOH will sound like?

Does your rig sound muffled on stage when its dialed just right for FOH because your cab is aimed at your knees? I wonder if I should angle my cab?

Thoughts?
 

Frank67

Member
Messages
1,891
Good point!

I play direct into the PA and hear myself through the monitors which is fairly similar to what comes out of the PA. But I also go to the front during Soundcheck and see whether it sounds as expected. It is pretty reliable with the present day direct setups. I dial my sounds in at home at reasonably (not crazy) volume with a backing track and make minor tweaks during the rehearsals. That largely avoids unpleasant surprises.

the more complex subject is to keep all levels consistent when there is nobody at the mixing desk. I am presently mixing the desk recording of our gigs from yesterday and the day before for a video and I have to make some significant adjustments relative to what was recorded. Also the patch to patch balance is far from trivial and one cannot just go by a dB measure in my experience.
 

eclecto-acoustic

Serial tree-hugger
Messages
11,125
Best way to know what it's gonna sound like in FOH is to actually hear it in FOH. Document settings for various venues...having an EQ pedal can be great for this, keeping your core sounds the same and merely modifying your EQ pedal to accomodate the space.

I'm personally a big fan of pointing my amp at my head. It changes how I dial in my sounds for the better, and I can usually get away with a lot less stage volume while satisfying the "more me" itch.
 

RLD

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,729
I use Fractal modeling and an FRFR on stage. FOH gets same signal. Sound via mains sounds identical to stage sound only bigger.
Untitled5.jpg
 
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leonelh7

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,041
I would agree with @Blix in regards to a 57. Classic amp mic. Try a Md421 too. Very good mics and move it around. A GOOD sound guy should be able to figure that out. Yet good sound guys are rare these days. At least in my area.
 

amstrtatnut

Member
Messages
14,231
I would agree with @Blix in regards to a 57. Classic amp mic. Try a Md421 too. Very good mics and move it around. A GOOD sound guy should be able to figure that out. Yet good sound guys are rare these days. At least in my area.

I typically use a senheiser 609. I prefer it to the 57. I offered. Sound guy declined.

I cant say this was a good sound guy. I mean, we got thru it.
 

leonelh7

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,041
I typically use a senheiser 609. I prefer it to the 57. I offered. Sound guy declined.

I cant say this was a good sound guy. I mean, we got thru it.
So he used a 57? I am not a big fan of the 609. I have rarely used it in recordings for my studio.
 

twoheadedboy

Member
Messages
13,948
This is pretty much directed at people who DONT use IEMs.

I think I had too much treble dialed on my lead tone. It wasnt ice pick but wasnt fat sounding, which is what it sounded like on stage.

I think I made the mistake of dialing my tone without hearing it out front. I have a wireless and should have hopped off stage and should 20 feet in front of my rig.

How do you dial your sound so you know what FOH will sound like?

Does your rig sound muffled on stage when its dialed just right for FOH because your cab is aimed at your knees? I wonder if I should angle my cab?

Thoughts?

How was the clip recorded?
 

DunedinDragon

Member
Messages
1,373
That was always a constant battle when I was playing through an amp on stage. Getting the right mic and mic position was always a battle and often the floor monitors weren't anything close to the quality and performance of the front speakers in most cases so they weren't a very accurate representation of what the audience was hearing.

I ended that battle 8 years ago when I went to using a modeler and dialing in my tones at home using a high quality PA style speaker (Yamaha DXR12).
 

MrTAteMyBalls

Member
Messages
4,663
This is pretty much directed at people who DONT use IEMs.

I think I had too much treble dialed on my lead tone. It wasnt ice pick but wasnt fat sounding, which is what it sounded like on stage.

I think I made the mistake of dialing my tone without hearing it out front. I have a wireless and should have hopped off stage and should 20 feet in front of my rig.

How do you dial your sound so you know what FOH will sound like?

Does your rig sound muffled on stage when its dialed just right for FOH because your cab is aimed at your knees? I wonder if I should angle my cab?

Thoughts?


When your cab is pointed at your knees you are not really hearing what your amp sounds like.

Put your ear in front of the speaker or point the amp at your head and you will hear it the way the mic hears it. This will sound drastically different than what you hear at ear level when your amp is on the ground facing your knees.
 

Muzbomb

Member
Messages
96
Ditto from me re amp pointing at your face, with a large PA, I use a small 15w valve amp, on a kick back stand pointing either across the stage or back towards the band. This stops the 10" speaker beaming lots of high frequencies across the room, I can hear it fine and the guitar responds well to having the speaker pointing at it too. Keeps the sound guy very happy, the stage volume reasonably low and the low frequency content of the guitar in check, which in turn keeps the bass player happy.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
36,914
Can't tell you which one you might like but DI from a compensated box (H&K Redbox style) makes a lot of sense.
 

Tony

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,185
Ditto from me re amp pointing at your face, with a large PA, I use a small 15w valve amp, on a kick back stand pointing either across the stage or back towards the band. This stops the 10" speaker beaming lots of high frequencies across the room, I can hear it fine and the guitar responds well to having the speaker pointing at it too. Keeps the sound guy very happy, the stage volume reasonably low and the low frequency content of the guitar in check, which in turn keeps the bass player happy.

Wifey and I heard Johnny Hiland at a festival awhile back. He had a 2x12 combo of some sort. Keyboard guy took a solo and we couldn’t hear a note of it…

…until we took two steps right out of the 2x12 beam and the whole FOH mix came into focus. The beaming thing is indeed a thing.
 




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