1. brad347

    brad347 Member

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    just curious guys, what are the main ways excessive heat can damage and amplifier?

    I had a studio session last night, put my amp in the booth and didn't think twice. I let the engineer do his job...

    Well, he was a younger engineer and put a BIG SOUND DAMPENING BLANKET over the amplifier and microphone. I mean, he draped it ALL THE WAY OVER my '65 Deluxe. Didn't notice until about 3-4 hours later after the session when I went to retrieve my amp. The amp was HOT physically... not like burning your hand hot but VERY hot to the touch (more than normal).

    I have durable NOS tubes in there (marconi power, mullard preamp) but is it likely that this kind of treatment caused some kind of premature wear to my tubes?

    I tried to let it cool as much as I could before moving it (I packed it up last). Amp worked and sounded fine on the last take of the last tune so I guess it's alright... just wondering.

    Moral of the story is, WATCH ENGINEERS especially if they're young! :)
     
  2. mbratch

    mbratch Member

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    On a vintage hand-wired amp and NOS tubes, it probably didn't hurt much for one session, but I wouldn't make a habit of it.

    It never ceases to amaze me what sound engineers ask me to do with my amp (generally polite things, that is). ;) They all seem to have their own favorite ways of making it sound better, or handling different recording issues.
     
  3. donnyjaguar

    donnyjaguar Member

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    I say if you didn't smell anything out of the ordinary, you're fine.

    Mind you, there are sometimes smells in the recording booth that aren't considered normal to the mainstream crowd... :)
     
  4. brad347

    brad347 Member

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    nope. Just smelled like a hot fender amp! (i actually love that smell)
     
  5. mbratch

    mbratch Member

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    +1 :)
     
  6. justicetones

    justicetones Member

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    Having worked as an engineer for 8 years I would say it is safe to say that IMHO....there is probably not a real good reason to cover an amp with a blanket.

    1. The blanket will not effectively kill much if any amp sound from finding it's way into other mics. Or preventing any room bleed back into the mic. The amp is usually to loud for this to be possible. If the amp is not isolated in a separate room it will bleed into other things no matter what so the blanket would be pointless there also.

    2. IF the amp is isolated again the blanket would be pointless. I would never cover one up. I might put a baffle in front of it to shrink the reflection zone, diffuse some sound and enhance the tightness of the sound coming from the mic.

    Also if someone in the studio requests that I do not place something on their equipment or has a concern about something I always listen and try to respect that. They are paying you to help them record. Not the other way around.

    I would insist next time that the amp is not covered. There is NO benefit that I have ever experienced. That is what studio baffles are for or a sonex covered drum shield.


    Just my 2ยข...

    Also sound source Bleed is not always a bad thing. Sometimes when you try to reduce it you end up changing the frequency makeup of the bleed and actually cause more issues (phasing).


    Many of my amps have become hot in the studio or live and I am sure it is fine since it was a isolated incident.
     

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