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Hedges inspired generation of guitarists

Rumblefish

Member
Messages
2,735
Yea they can tap and slap and play altered tunings etc.,but they still don't have his soulfulness.Just listen to Ragamuffin on Aerial Boundaries.He was tapped inti something very special and very very deep.
 

peachead1071

Member
Messages
379
These was one of these cats that opened for Derek Trucks in Memphis last week. It was cool, but as rumblefish stated, I get into Hedges on a much deeper level. There was a beauty to what he did that was just mind boggling.
 

screamtone

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,464
I was lucky enough to see Michael Hedges about 6-7 months before he passed. Unbelievably inspiring.
 

Mandoboy

Member
Messages
1,768
A student of mine from CA told me about him in 1981 before Aerial Boundries- got the album and whoa- the first really revolutionary acoustic guitarist since (for me) Tony Rice...

Saw him on a bill w/ Darol Anger and Mike Marshall in the 80's- seemed like a great, friendly guy on top of being a monster musician.

I think another aspect of what separates him from the pack, besides being the ground zero guy for those techniques on guitar, is that like Zappa, he was a composer who happened to play guitar. He used over 40 tunings, but wait- he really knew what notes he was playing in each tuning, as opposed to 'see what happens if I use this shape'. That combination of thought and soul is a big reason why his music sounds as it does...it doesn't hurt that he actually studied composition as well.
 

tbone666

Member
Messages
269
i don't know if anyone here is into this guy but i can tell you he's awesome and original - however heavily hedges inspired.

http://www.myspace.com/kellerwilliams

i've been seeing him play since '95 and he's fun, interesting, and amazing.

if you all are familiar with Keller Williams, then you know what i'm talking about. I did think he had a regular website and not just myspace - oh well no time for searches now.
 

gpro34

Member
Messages
5,372
A student of mine from CA told me about him in 1981 before Aerial Boundries- got the album and whoa- the first really revolutionary acoustic guitarist since (for me) Tony Rice...

Saw him on a bill w/ Darol Anger and Mike Marshall in the 80's- seemed like a great, friendly guy on top of being a monster musician.

I think another aspect of what separates him from the pack, besides being the ground zero guy for those techniques on guitar, is that like Zappa, he was a composer who happened to play guitar. He used over 40 tunings, but wait- he really knew what notes he was playing in each tuning, as opposed to 'see what happens if I use this shape'. That combination of thought and soul is a big reason why his music sounds as it does...it doesn't hurt that he actually studied composition as well.
Good point about knowing what notes he was playing. I know many who adjust to these different tunings because it sounds cool, but retain none of the true methodology behind them. I'm not an acoustic performer, but I can appreciate his amazing talent and abilities. His songs where actually very good and heart felt. Michael had more soul than most of these other technicians. He will be missed..
 

jimfog

Senior Member
Messages
9,477
I've seen many AMAZING musicians over the years.

Michael was one of the only ones where I have no idea how he got "from here to there".

Even in some stunning virtuosos, I can at least fathom how they got to their amazing level.....even if I could never approach it.

Michael just came from another dimension.

Sorely missed.
 

rhinocaster

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
23,369
A

I think another aspect of what separates him from the pack, besides being the ground zero guy for those techniques on guitar, is that like Zappa, he was a composer who happened to play guitar. He used over 40 tunings, but wait- he really knew what notes he was playing in each tuning, as opposed to 'see what happens if I use this shape'. That combination of thought and soul is a big reason why his music sounds as it does...it doesn't hurt that he actually studied composition as well.
Absolutely agree. His technique and tunings were a result of his compositions. You can hear that.

Too much of what I hear today from those inspired by MH is simply (impressive) stunt guitar playing.
 

gpro34

Member
Messages
5,372
It may be worth mentioned when comparing Michael Hedges to others that he was the first. Once the groundwork been laid it's much easier to follow or copy what has already been done. There are very few guitar players that have a style so unique it inspires generations.
 

townsend

Member
Messages
1,519
Absolutely agree. His technique and tunings were a result of his compositions. You can hear that.

Too much of what I hear today from those inspired by MH is simply (impressive) stunt guitar playing.
Couldn't agree more. I think most of us who have posted in this thread (so far!) view--and rightfully so--Michael Hedges as a unique, unparalleled artist.

Joni Mitchell was another unparalleled artist. She heard sounds in her head and created alternate tunings to play these songs. Lots of female singer songwriters after her, many very talent . . . but they are different.
 

jimfog

Senior Member
Messages
9,477
Joni Mitchell was another unparalleled artist. She heard sounds in her head and created alternate tunings to play these songs. Lots of female singer songwriters after her, many very talent . . . but they are different.
...and not coincidentally, Joni was a big influence on Michael.
 

tbone666

Member
Messages
269
I saw him open up for CSN back in the summer of '92 at the now defunct Poplar Creek just west of Chicago. Never heard of him before and was utterly amazed - his version of Watchtower was unbelievable.
 

Jahn

Listens to Johnny Marr, plays like John Denver
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
28,933
in college i had the great fortune to see some great acts in the early 90's, all in a chapel (amazing acoustics) - Hedges, Kottke, Bela Fleck, Shawn Colvin, the list goes on. Man, I miss those days!
 




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