Help a Pro Tools Newbie.

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by MrNick, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. MrNick

    MrNick Member

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    I am using Pro Tools LE for mac 7.3.1 . I know how to quick punch, but how can I set a track to start recording at a specific spot?
     
  2. Kenny D

    Kenny D Member

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    QP begins recording at the pre-roll.

    Not using QP results in recording starting at the punch point.

    I am sure there are other options but I use QP almost all the time. It's the only way I found to pretty much get rid of clicks at the punch point.

    I am using 7.3.1 on a TDM HD-2 system.
     
  3. ManCas

    ManCas Member

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    Yeah, just set the pre-roll to 1 or two bars, or whatever you need, then place the timeline where you want it to start recording, arm the track and press record.
    You can set the pre-roll on the Transport Bar (View Menu or CMD+1 on Num Pad)

    To Kenny D, why is it that must people using HD don't use the auto region fade feature? it appears that everyone is just comfortable making crossfades all over the regions. I love that thing.
     
  4. Kenny D

    Kenny D Member

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    I am a SONAR user as well as PT.

    One of the things I loved about SONAR was the "Snap to Zero Crossing" feature. I never had clicks & pops at punch points in SONAR. When I started using PT, I was getting crappy punch points which QP solved. Of course, one still must choose the punch point carefully, especially on drum and vox tracks but these are not issues with zero crossings. Punching at a zero crossing pretty much guarantees a noise-free punch point.

    QP solves much of the problems with punch-ins at the slight expense of additional audio and you don't have to do manual crossfades.

    I am no expert and I would love to hear other's recommendation for using PT.
     
  5. Jayson Chance

    Jayson Chance Member

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    The timeline method works well.

    or, you could set your pre-roll and post roll to a certain point, and simply highlight the section of the track you want punched in with your mouse.

    Both ways work well. I usually just use the highlight method so I can begin playing the phrase before the punch and keep playing through where the post-roll stops.. That way it just punches in the spot I want to clean up, and makes the phrase flow better (for me at least) so it doesn't sound so obvious there's a punch.
     
  6. ManCas

    ManCas Member

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    That's the most important thing. If you're correcting a certain part the best thing is to do the "highlight method" and set the pre-roll kind of long...

    To Kenny D. That's good to know... (Sonar's zero crossings stuff), I'm not familiar with Sonar, I worked with it very briefly on version 2 and 3. Actually, I got started in all this with Cakewalk's Pro Audio 9...hehe... quite a difference....

    Then I had to learned PT and Logic since most studios around here work with that.

    Cheers.
     
  7. Kenny D

    Kenny D Member

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    LOL!

    I got started with PA 9 as well.

    PA 9 also had the snap to zero crossing as well, I believe. In any case, whenever you placed the cursor on a region, it would automatically locate the cursor at a zero crossing. This was tremendously helpful.

    Of course, PT handles it well if you use QP. The nice thing about QP is it does the crossfades for you so there's no clean up.

    I was told by a professional engineer that each punch has to be checked for accuracy and possibly crossfaded. QP saves a lot of trouble.
     

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