Help Needed- repairing speaker lug/tab

Discussion in 'Amps/Cabs Tech Corner: Amplifier, Cab & Speakers' started by N.P.C., May 30, 2015.

  1. N.P.C.

    N.P.C. Member

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    He guys,
    I just scored a great Yamaha G100 1x12 - think Paul Rivera.
    These amps have one of the best clean sounds I've ever played through. Robben Ford, Metheny, Stern, etc. have all used one at some point or another.
    Anyway, after cleaning it up and trouble shooting some issues it had.

    I found that one of the speaker tabs or lugs (not sure of the correct name) was broken and looked liked it had been glued back together. It's what the wire coming from inside the speaker connects to, that the terminals fit onto.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Anybody here repaired one of these? What is that part called? The wire from inside the speaker isn't real long either, and might present a problem trying to re-solder it to a new terminal or whatever it's called.
    Thanks for any help. I'll be sure to post before and after pics of this amp after I clean it up and restore it a bit.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2015
  2. zenas

    zenas Member

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    I believe Weber sells new ones. They tend to be rivited on so you might have to drill or grind the old rivet.

    If the tinsel wire it too short they have that too. Maybe not ideal but you could solder a litte on it.

    20 odd years ago I fixed one on a Fane with some two part epoxy. Probably not the best plan but I didn't have internet then.
    It's still in the Hiwatt cab working fine though.

    If you go that route make darn sure the stuff doesn't conduct electricity.
     
  3. J M Fahey

    J M Fahey Member

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    Sorry but no.
    Please post the actual damaged one.
     
  4. N.P.C.

    N.P.C. Member

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    updated with pictures of actual speaker
     
  5. zzmoore

    zzmoore Member

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    ...terminal strip.....
     
  6. N.P.C.

    N.P.C. Member

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    where does one buy a terminal strip?
    checked all the electronic places today...no luck
     
  7. zenas

    zenas Member

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  8. zzmoore

    zzmoore Member

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    That link will have them ^^^^^^^^^
    or...
    No sure THAT was original, but.....PM me an address and I will ship you a few.
    I am sure the one on your speaker was cut down, I can do that if you need.
    good luck
     
  9. N.P.C.

    N.P.C. Member

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  10. zzmoore

    zzmoore Member

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    That is exactly it.
    You CAN use something more traditional, but that will work fine.
    best
     
  11. zenas

    zenas Member

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    Looks like that'll work. Just bend the tab as needed.
     
  12. N.P.C.

    N.P.C. Member

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    thanks for the help guys, much appreciated.
     
  13. J M Fahey

    J M Fahey Member

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    Was chiming in to suggest the same but you already got excellent advice and a generous offer..
    The original one is specially made for speakers, and has 2 tabs/spade_lugs each of the proper width and thickness to fit standard female push-in terminals, and chain the speaker to others, it can be bought but at speaker supply shops, as rare as hen's teeth.
    That said, Weber might have some.

    The general purpose one suggested above will work fine, might take the female terminals , just hold them in your hand to avoid cracking them, and everything will be fine.
    Worst case , you solder your wires there.
    Provide some relief, a clamp of some kind, to avoid or relieve cables pulling on the terminal strip.

    Both + and - tinsel wires must go to the external floating wires, but remember that some Japanese makers ground the speaker frame to amp chassis, you might find a mystery "third" wire for that.
    If so, solder it to the center lug which is grounded to the frame.
    Not strictly necessary, but it will keep the original Mojo, he he.

    As a side note, congatulations, you got an *excellent* amp, good on its own as a clean one and a good pedal base too.
     
  14. zzmoore

    zzmoore Member

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    Hey Juan - What does chassis grounding the speaker frame accomplish.?
    Thanks
     
  15. J M Fahey

    J M Fahey Member

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    Hi.
    In a normal guitar amp, nothing; doubly so in a combo where speakers are by definition real close to the amp.

    But it's common practice in distributed PA speakers, think those roof mounted in a school, WalMart, an airport or train station or even a sports field, when so far away it was found that sometimes the frame gets some static electricity and sparks jump from floating frame to grounded voice coil (since at least one of its terminals is amp ground) so they play it safe and also ground the speaker frame.

    Remember Japanese designers (same as German) were typically OCD guys who wanted to leave no stone unturned in search of perfection, so they often run everything "by the book" in a very perfectionist way.

    As said before, you won't necessarily find it there, but I have found that in some Roland amps, so you might also.
     
  16. zzmoore

    zzmoore Member

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    Wow...OK. That is interesting.
    Per usual.......Thanks for the info. :)
     

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