Help w/My First Tube Amp

Jimmy 3

Member
Messages
169
Happy New Year to all,

Got my first tube amp - Jaguar Amplification Twin (here's a link to a review and some details - http://www.premierguitar.com/articles/jaguar-twin-1

So looking to get some nice crunch tones at low volumes (for home use). Am I correct that I can turn the "Master Volume" up to 10 and then keep the "Volume" - which is gain - fairly low . . . say at 1?

I assume if I want clean, I keep "volume" low and turn-up the "Master"

Also, is the Master Volume for pre or post . . . assume "volume" would be the other.

Sorry if these are fairly obvious questions but just learning : )

Thanks,
Jimmy
 

Roccorobb

Member
Messages
1,666
Not familiar with your amp specifically, but usually an amp's master volume knob controls gain post-preamp (or sometimes post-phase inverter) and the 'volume' knob control preamp gain.
So, if you want crunch at low volume, set volume high to drive the preamp, and set the master volume low to control volume level.
And like you said, if you want a clean sound, get your master up and keep you preamp volume low.
Congrats on a new amp!
 

BlueRiff

Senior Member
Messages
7,745
Happy New Year to all,

Got my first tube amp - Jaguar Amplification Twin (here's a link to a review and some details - http://www.premierguitar.com/articles/jaguar-twin-1

So looking to get some nice crunch tones at low volumes (for home use). Am I correct that I can turn the "Master Volume" up to 10 and then keep the "Volume" - which is gain - fairly low . . . say at 1?

I assume if I want clean, I keep "volume" low and turn-up the "Master"

Also, is the Master Volume for pre or post . . . assume "volume" would be the other.

Sorry if these are fairly obvious questions but just learning : )

Thanks,
Jimmy
You might want to contact them (http://www.jaguaramplification.com/contact.html) to get the manual for this model. But typically, to drive most amps with master volume, you crank up volume to the amount of overdrive you want with master turned down, then bring up master to taste. But looking at the position of the knobs on this unit, its hard to tell. It's a good idea anyway to get the manual to get the most out of the amp, learn all of its features, warranty, support, etc. Congratulations on a very nice first tube amp!
 

scott944

Member
Messages
3,983
Depending on what your definitions are for "crunch" and "home use", that amp may not be the ticket without a pedal in front. That said, remocity has it right - turn some knobs and see what happens!
 

Jimmy 3

Member
Messages
169
Not knowing much about these amps, I didn't want to cause any damage. My first day with it, I kept the Master Volume low (1-2) and then adjusted the "Volume" control to add gain. But, didn't know how doing the reverse (Turn up Master and keep Volume low) would affect the tone (or cause a problem with the amp). Can anyone advise?

Again, my apologies if these are stupid questions, but I'm trying to learn and obviously don't want to damage anything.
 

Stu Cats

Member
Messages
15,240
The amp will have the police at your door with crunch tones. With a pedal, you can get OD or distortion, but will not achieve power tube crunch. It will still sound small and fizzy.
 

stevel

Member
Messages
15,794
Jimmy,

There's a possibility you could damage the amp if turn everything to 10 and put input signal into it that will blow the speakers.

But generally speaking, amps like this are going to get unreasonably loud (for most people) long before they get to points where damage will be done.

The Master Volume controls the overall volume. Usually, a Master Volume on 10 (or all the way up) acts just like if the amp didn't have any master volume control at all - if it's 50 watts, it's 50 watts. What a Master Volume typically does is turn the amp down (attenuates = output less wattage) as you drop it from 10 to lower volumes.

Obviously, most amps are pretty loud on 10, so most people tend to approach a Master Volume as "turning up" the amp - they start with it low and bring it up to taste.

There's typically no harm in running the Master on 10 and the Volume on 5, or the reverse, other than it being too loud and possibly, too loud for the speakers.

The point of having a "Pre-Amp Volume" (Channel Volume, or just Volume) is to be able to turn that up high to get pre-amp gain (overdrive/distortion) then use the Master Volume to dial back the overall volume to a comfortable level.

So for at home drive, you generally want your Volume (Channel Volume) high, and the Master Volume low.

AS others have mentioned, there can be amps where the circuitry is "non-traditional" and the controls work differently, but usually the two volumes interact with each other to produce different sounds, giving you much more versatility than an amp without a master volume control (becuase it's basically just running the master on 10).

Some things you can do to protect the amp:

1. Always plug your cable into the guitar first, then into the amp, with the amp OFF. Do not turn on the amp until both ends of the cable are plugged in (guitar end and amp end). Do not turn on the amp until you first look at the master and volume controls. It's always a good idea to lower the master volume to 0 before turning on the amp. If the amp has an "on" and "standby" switch, you should turn the amp "on" first, and let it warm up 30 seconds to a minute before flipping the "standby" switch. Once it's on and ready to go, play while bringing up the master volume to a comfortable level.

Watch yourself on this - sometimes people will turn it on, forget about the standby they start to bring up the Master, and have no sound, then bring the master up to 10, then remember to flip the switch - pop, bang, hiss - could cause a problem.

2. When turning off the amp, or when not playing, NEVER unplug the guitar from the cable first. Basically reverse the procedure above: Turn the master to 0, put it in standby, turn it off if turning it off, then unplug the cable from the AMP first, and guitar last.

The standby switch in essences "silences" the amp, so you can plug an unplug the guitar with it in standby, without first unplugging from the amp or turning the master to 0 (like if you wanted to switch guitars with the amp still on).

Most amps can tolerate if you make mistakes with this process, but basically this prevents loud unwanted or potentially damaging sounds from getting to the speakers. So don't freak out if you accidentally unplug your guitar from the cable and it's suddenly humming like crazy through the amp, but run over and turn it down or flip the standby, or turn the amp off.

But if you get into the habit of always having the amp turned all the way down before turning it on, and making sure both the guitar and amp are connected with the cable before turning it on, you're going to eliminate the risk of doing anything that might (might) cause a problem.

And it's just always a good idea to start with the volume low and bring it up that way it gives you time to notice if there's anything funky happening with the signal going to your amp. If you turn it on on 10 and something weird is happening, by the time the amp warms up and reaches full volume you might not be in a position to grab the master or hit the power again if something funky is happening. Blown speakers would suck.

Still, chances that you'll damage it other than just playing it louder than it can handle or by putting odd popping sounds (cables being plugged in or out of the guitar after everything's at playing volume) into it, are pretty slim.

Congratulations on your new amp. Enjoy it.
 

socalscott

Senior Member
Messages
2,012
Congrats to you. Can be an OMG experience with the speaker pushing some air(a bit loud). I've read that at least one of their amps has a fabulous mv. Maybe it's all Jags?
Hey keep posting questions, search jaguar amps, especially gewgl and utewb. Find out what settings are good with your pickups/guitar/styles. Some amps sound great with all the eq dimed. Well maybe not presence. Completely cut all tone controls, then roll one up to understand its affect. Repeat for each one. Some designs have a lot of interaction and sensitivity, others not at all, so try T and B only with varied ratios and so on.
If a new unit, look into speaker break-in techniques. This requires 10's of hours. Read a method that was simply to plug in a git cable and set it on the amp. The buzz helps. Another was to loop some bass and drum tracks. Not a bad idea to use a spare solid state amp or stereo...save them tubes.

Enjoy
 

WhoJamFan

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,605
Jimmy,

There's a possibility you could damage the amp if turn everything to 10 and put input signal into it that will blow the speakers.

But generally speaking, amps like this are going to get unreasonably loud (for most people) long before they get to points where damage will be done.

The Master Volume controls the overall volume. Usually, a Master Volume on 10 (or all the way up) acts just like if the amp didn't have any master volume control at all - if it's 50 watts, it's 50 watts. What a Master Volume typically does is turn the amp down (attenuates = output less wattage) as you drop it from 10 to lower volumes.

Obviously, most amps are pretty loud on 10, so most people tend to approach a Master Volume as "turning up" the amp - they start with it low and bring it up to taste.

There's typically no harm in running the Master on 10 and the Volume on 5, or the reverse, other than it being too loud and possibly, too loud for the speakers.

The point of having a "Pre-Amp Volume" (Channel Volume, or just Volume) is to be able to turn that up high to get pre-amp gain (overdrive/distortion) then use the Master Volume to dial back the overall volume to a comfortable level.

So for at home drive, you generally want your Volume (Channel Volume) high, and the Master Volume low.

AS others have mentioned, there can be amps where the circuitry is "non-traditional" and the controls work differently, but usually the two volumes interact with each other to produce different sounds, giving you much more versatility than an amp without a master volume control (becuase it's basically just running the master on 10).

Some things you can do to protect the amp:

1. Always plug your cable into the guitar first, then into the amp, with the amp OFF. Do not turn on the amp until both ends of the cable are plugged in (guitar end and amp end). Do not turn on the amp until you first look at the master and volume controls. It's always a good idea to lower the master volume to 0 before turning on the amp. If the amp has an "on" and "standby" switch, you should turn the amp "on" first, and let it warm up 30 seconds to a minute before flipping the "standby" switch. Once it's on and ready to go, play while bringing up the master volume to a comfortable level.

Watch yourself on this - sometimes people will turn it on, forget about the standby they start to bring up the Master, and have no sound, then bring the master up to 10, then remember to flip the switch - pop, bang, hiss - could cause a problem.

2. When turning off the amp, or when not playing, NEVER unplug the guitar from the cable first. Basically reverse the procedure above: Turn the master to 0, put it in standby, turn it off if turning it off, then unplug the cable from the AMP first, and guitar last.

The standby switch in essences "silences" the amp, so you can plug an unplug the guitar with it in standby, without first unplugging from the amp or turning the master to 0 (like if you wanted to switch guitars with the amp still on).

Most amps can tolerate if you make mistakes with this process, but basically this prevents loud unwanted or potentially damaging sounds from getting to the speakers. So don't freak out if you accidentally unplug your guitar from the cable and it's suddenly humming like crazy through the amp, but run over and turn it down or flip the standby, or turn the amp off.

But if you get into the habit of always having the amp turned all the way down before turning it on, and making sure both the guitar and amp are connected with the cable before turning it on, you're going to eliminate the risk of doing anything that might (might) cause a problem.

And it's just always a good idea to start with the volume low and bring it up that way it gives you time to notice if there's anything funky happening with the signal going to your amp. If you turn it on on 10 and something weird is happening, by the time the amp warms up and reaches full volume you might not be in a position to grab the master or hit the power again if something funky is happening. Blown speakers would suck.

Still, chances that you'll damage it other than just playing it louder than it can handle or by putting odd popping sounds (cables being plugged in or out of the guitar after everything's at playing volume) into it, are pretty slim.

Congratulations on your new amp. Enjoy it.

I would also add NEVER turn the amp on without a speaker connected, and don't go inside of it-even just for a look-as amps contain(even some that haven't been plugged in for months)voltages that can HURT or KILL you if you don't know anything about them.
Enjoy the amp, and be safe.
 

Rumors of War

Member
Messages
5,283
As someone else said, twist some knobs. With that in mind, there is usually a sweet spot between volume/gain and the master, which will be loud, but not deafening, and have nice clarity. Find that spot, set your eq where you like, and rock out.
 




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