Help with playing like Slash and Mark Tremonti?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by tremonti, May 24, 2008.

  1. tremonti

    tremonti Member

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    Here's my dilema. I am 30 yrs old...been playing lead electric guitar for 12 years. I mainly use the blues scale mainly and play quite well with good melodic lines and have a bag of flash tricks too. I would like some help in playing more like Slash and also Mark Tremonti....I love how Slash runs these seemingly endless runs up the neck and was wondering if you guys had some tips. Also...what scales does Tremonti use mainly? I feel stagnant and also wonder what online pay guitar lesson sites are good? Again...Mark Tremonti and Slash are my 2 favorites(different I know). Thanks!
     
  2. ?&!

    ?&! Member

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    Slash's deal has a lot to do with mixing major and minor pentatonic scales within the same phrase. It's an old trick I'm sure he picked up from Clapton and Joe Perry and many other blues/rock players when he was a kid. Where he departs from that style is when he "plays the changes", sort of from a jazz perspective. Jazz players generally play off chord tones more than they rely on scales, and it seems that Slash has an ability to pay a little more attention to the underlying harmony than most rock players. He has an ability to seamlessly connect different pentatonic scales to match the chords as they go by. It's an elusive skill to master, but worth it. Check out the "Mr. Brownstone" solo and listen for it. He also sneaks in some harmonic minor (natural minor with a raised 7th) sometimes, particularly on the "Sweet Child O' Mine" solo.

    As far as Tremonti goes, just buy some Paul Gilbert videos. I read a Guitar World interview with him, and he said that after Creed broke up, he just bought a bunch of instructional videos and headed for the woodshed. I'm not a fan of his music, but the guy did manage to develop some pretty serious chops post-Creed. Good luck!!!
     
  3. tremonti

    tremonti Member

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    Thanks! Really appreciate it. Anyone else? Any good Slash DVD's for learning his style?
     
  4. tremonti

    tremonti Member

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  5. SvenHock

    SvenHock Member

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    Study and transcribe Slash and Tremonti's playing. I cannot imagine a better way than picking their parts off of their own recordings.
     
  6. shredtheater

    shredtheater Member

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  7. tremonti

    tremonti Member

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    Cool...can't wait for that Tremonti site! Any other tips for Slash's scales and or websites to learn from?
     
  8. jazzandmetal?

    jazzandmetal? Supporting Member

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    Learn the pentatonic scale in all 5 positions and learn some of his solos.
     
  9. GuitarKidd

    GuitarKidd Member

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    Mark Tremonti took Private lessons from Shredder Troy Stetina. Stetina has a ton of books, all published by Hal Leonard, and some DVD's as well. I have several books and the best one is "Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar". It teaches no theory, but it's all legato, alternate picking and Sweep picking excersizes, which is what Mark set out to learn, and rather quickly he did. He really developed some great chops...

    Once you get your fingers and chops in shape, then learn where and how to apply those licks, but I know for sure that Tremonti took lessons from Stetina himself.
     
  10. brad347

    brad347 Member

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    The answer to this question is very easy (and fun!)

    As others have alluded to, the best way to get inside someone else's style is to spend some time playing their style.

    Use your guitar and amp to get your sound as close to theirs as you can, put on some headphones, learn some licks, phrases, and solos note for note (learn the chords under the solos too, so you understand what's going on) and practice trying to make the guitarist in the headphones disappear! I.e. match tone, time, phrasing, and of course pitch as exactly as you can, so that you literally cannot hear slash in the cans anymore as he gets subsumed into your own guitar.

    Not rocket science. Not even terribly hard work. Just fun. Not only that, no amounts of lessons, online or otherwise, can surpass that particular exercise when it comes to learning/imitating another player's style.
     
  11. gennation

    gennation Member

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    Learn to use the Major Pentatonic and the Blues scale as one scale form the same Root.

    Here's a full blown tutorial on it: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/AdvPent/AvdPentTOC.htm

    This is dead on for a rock, blues, Pentatonic player trying to figure out where all those other notes come from and how to incorporate them.

    MAKE SURE you read the Introduction.
     
  12. groovy daddy

    groovy daddy Member

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    I've been holding back on this one but I think Slash's playing comes from life experiences plus a whole lot of natural talent. Don't try too hard to duplicate this one or it may kill you first.
     
  13. soulohio

    soulohio Member

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  14. integris2

    integris2 Member

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    Learn your major and minor scales as well. Once you get a grasp of those (being able to play them well and understanding the theory behind them), then move on to the modes.
    I am a big Mark Tremonti fan, and I would say the biggest to help with learning his style is, in addition to working on fundamentals, listening to and playing his music. The guitar book for One Day Remains is a good tool for not only learning Alter Bridge's songs, but studying Tremonti's compositional/playing techniques. That's how musicians learned from the great composers of the past; by analyzing their works.
    Tremonti will be coming out with an instructional DVD sometime this summer that will feature other great players like Michael Angelo Batio and, I think, Rusty Cooley, and some others. That will be something worth picking up. I hope this is all helpful.
     
  15. StanG

    StanG Member

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    Hey Groovy Daddy, I'll bet that all those famous junkie musicians spent a lot of time getting their chops together before they got junked out.
     
  16. groovy daddy

    groovy daddy Member

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    Stan G.-I'm too old to take a sucker bet like that. You are absolutely right- true talent and study is most important.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2008

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