Help with two very common fixes

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by RocknPop, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. RocknPop

    RocknPop Supporting Member

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    Hey guys, I got my new (used) '07 Gibson Les Paul Classic in the mail yesterday and love it, but it has two issues I was hoping you guys could guide me on fixing or estimating a quote:

    1) The jack is lose: when I wiggle the guitar cable the signal will come on/off. I say this is common because I pick up guitars at GC who have this all the time. Can I fix this myself or do I need to take it to a tech?

    2) The tone knob for the neck pickup is VERY hard to turn: It's not that the knob is rubbing on the guitar surface, but if I take off the tone knob, I can barely turn the thing.

    Thanks guys
     
  2. Crankston Shnord

    Crankston Shnord Active Member

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    Hmmmm.......The jack is most likely a bad solder connection. If you are comfortable with basic soldering, I would recommend that you just patch it yourself. You can use a screwdriver to remove the plate with the jack on it. If the solder connections look solid, but aren't shiny, you can reheat the solder with your soldering iron on the jacks lugs, just make sure that you get it hot enough to refuse the solder into it's "shiny" state. Apply more solder if necessary.
    Another possibility might be that the jack is just loose. This is also an easy fix. After removing the plate, you can grip the nut on the jack with pliers. IMPORTANT: Put cloth between the teeth of the pliers and the nut, otherwise it will scratch. You can probably get it tight enough just by holding the other side of the jack with your fingers (or another pair of pliers). I played a Strat for a while that had the same problem, and it ended up being both of these problems :)

    The tone knob problem could be caused by a number of things, but it sounds to me like you just have a poorly designed pot. Basically, you can either put up with it or replace it. This is also a relatively simple fix if you are comfortable with taking a soldering iron to your guitar. Use a screwdriver to remove the control cavity panel. That would be the diamond shaped one (on most Les Pauls). Remove the knob to the volume pot. The pot itself will either be attached to the guitar by a nut or a screw (or nothing, it just depends). After removing the pot (soldering may be required) try to turn it. Is it still really sticky? If not, the problem is with your guitar body; something is putting pressure on the shaft and keeping it from spinning freely. If it's still sticky, you have a bad pot. Look at the pot. It will have number written on it, such as A500K. That is the type of pot you need. All you have to do now is order one with the same number (mammoth electronics.com). Also make sure that the new pot has the same size shaft and such as the sold one. All you have to do now is install the new pot.

    If you are uncomfortable with any of that, take it to a tech. Personally I like doing thing myself because it's free :)

    I hope that's helpful!!
     
  3. RocknPop

    RocknPop Supporting Member

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    Cranston, thanks for the great advice! The question is, should I buy a soldering iron and start learning with this guitar or should I just take it to someone this time.

    Do you think any if these would be included in a setup?
     
  4. VHS analog

    VHS analog Member

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    With a setup the additional cost would be minimal. Those are easy fixes.
     
  5. Crankston Shnord

    Crankston Shnord Active Member

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    +1 on that. You can't go wrong with getting your own tools. This place has a great soldering tutorial. Just scroll down a little ways.

    If you run into any issues please met me know and I'll do my best to walk you through it. This diy stuff is a big hobby of mine, and I never would have been able to get into it if I didn't have other people to rely on, so I am always happy to help others along :)

    Best of luck!!!
     
  6. RocknPop

    RocknPop Supporting Member

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    Thanks called about 6 places and only one guy agreed with you - that's where I'm taking my guitar tomorrow. :)
     
  7. Crankston Shnord

    Crankston Shnord Active Member

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    LOL
     
  8. treeofpain

    treeofpain Silver Supporting Member

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    I agree that the cost should be minimal. Whether you should try to learn this yourself is up to you.
     

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