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High E slips off

Jabby92

Member
Messages
3,548
I've never ever had that issue on any Gibson. Its always been on a Fender with a 7.25" radius and skinny neck for me personally. Surprised you run into it, maybe the neck was built wrong or something else is going on with the nut or bridge.
 

unfunnyclown

Member
Messages
570
I have this problem on my 2018 LP Studio, though it’s only an issue when I use vibrato. Because of this thread, I’m going to try .11s (using .10s now) next time I change strings and see if it’s better. It’s already a lot better with .10s than with the .09s it shipped with.
 

Mark Robinson

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
8,434
Easy to just have the saddle corrected. The Jaguar just needs the neck properly positioned. A little bump, shipping, or in the case can be enough. I would take either one to a thorough Tech, for a deep setup and leave a specific note in the case or bag, describing the issue. Super basic repairs.
 

rednoise

Member
Messages
676
After your-all's comments I looked more closely at the fret ends with a magnifying glass and now I'm thinking that the issue is due to the fret ends being rounded off too close to the center of the fingerboard. The neck doesn't seem to be twisted and the bridge is OK. Whether this is how it came from the factory or was the result of an over-zealous fret dressing I guess I'll never know (but I suspect it was the latter.) Neck binding has never been very important to me, but in this case, with the nibs, it cuts into the playable fret area and negatively affects the playability of the guitar. Not only that, you can feel and hear the transition between the metal fret and plastic binding nib, so you hear a minute *click* before the squawk of the string as it goes completely overboard. I suspect that there's no real solution except what @larry1096 suggested earlier, which is a refret, IOW, the damage is already done. So, the question becomes, do I live with it as I have for several years, or spring for a refret that would cost a significant percentage of the price I paid for the thing, or sell it and try again?

As I said in post #1, I really love the sound of the thing. Gibson P90s have mucho macho mojo. However, I have had some mounting issues with the basic design of the SG, so I'm wondering if another form factor with P90s might be the ultimate solution. A Les Paul Special or such, maybe.
 

rednoise

Member
Messages
676
Easy to just have the saddle corrected. The Jaguar just needs the neck properly positioned. A little bump, shipping, or in the case can be enough. I would take either one to a thorough Tech, for a deep setup and leave a specific note in the case or bag, describing the issue. Super basic repairs.
I would have thought that, too, except that the low E looks right, so bumping the neck would put it out of whack too. But maybe you're right, a little bump would put them both out of alignment, but within a reasonable margin of playability.
 

David Garner

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
5,854
depends on where it's slipping off. could be a nut slot spacing issue, or possibly during a fret dress someone beveled the treble edge too sharply
Could also be a misaligned saddle. I had the same issue with my EJ Strat and my PRS DGT when I first got them, within a year of each other. Just playing them over time I got used to it and managed to avoid the problem.

It’s odd for it to happen with a bound fretboard though. Usually there’s plenty of room there. So it may just be a technique issue.
 

Mark Robinson

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
8,434
After your-all's comments I looked more closely at the fret ends with a magnifying glass and now I'm thinking that the issue is due to the fret ends being rounded off too close to the center of the fingerboard. The neck doesn't seem to be twisted and the bridge is OK. Whether this is how it came from the factory or was the result of an over-zealous fret dressing I guess I'll never know (but I suspect it was the latter.) Neck binding has never been very important to me, but in this case, with the nibs, it cuts into the playable fret area and negatively affects the playability of the guitar. Not only that, you can feel and hear the transition between the metal fret and plastic binding nib, so you hear a minute *click* before the squawk of the string as it goes completely overboard. I suspect that there's no real solution except what @larry1096 suggested earlier, which is a refret, IOW, the damage is already done. So, the question becomes, do I live with it as I have for several years, or spring for a refret that would cost a significant percentage of the price I paid for the thing, or sell it and try again?

As I said in post #1, I really love the sound of the thing. Gibson P90s have mucho macho mojo. However, I have had some mounting issues with the basic design of the SG, so I'm wondering if another form factor with P90s might be the ultimate solution. A Les Paul Special or such, maybe.
That clicking thing with the nibs, prompted me to re-fret my very new Les Paul Custom years ago. Some Gibson guitars are just like that, others, most, are not. How is the pole-piece alignment? I would go at the bridge for low bucks before re-fretting, since this guitar appears to be not one of your main jams. A re-fret would be great, but you might feel bad spend the gettus and then selling it anyway. Try a Fabre tunematic and get it filed a bit narrower.
 

David Garner

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
5,854
You should be able to replace the saddles cheaply. I would do all of them. Use a proper ruler to space the strings. Be sure they’re aligned where you want them. I use a plastic mallet to just tap the string into the saddle, which I believe is what Faber recommends. Works like a charm and only sets you back the cost of the saddles. Worst case, you hate it worse or misalign them and you just put the old saddles back on.
 

Melange

Member
Messages
188
I have a 2006 Gibson SG Classic (bought used in 2013) that I like very much except that the high E string has an unfortunate tendency to slip off the edge of the fingerboard. I can mostly avoid it by being careful about my vibrato, but it still happens too often. None of my other guitars do this, but I had a couple of Gibsons back in the '70s that I recall doing it, too, though maybe not as badly as this one.

Is this a common problem with Gibsons in particular? I don't know if it's due to a botched fret dressing from before I bought it or if it was like that from the factory, but is this something that can be fixed now by a luthier?
I have the same problem with a LP Traditional 2012
 

dito

Member
Messages
162
After your-all's comments I looked more closely at the fret ends with a magnifying glass and now I'm thinking that the issue is due to the fret ends being rounded off too close to the center of the fingerboard. The neck doesn't seem to be twisted and the bridge is OK. Whether this is how it came from the factory or was the result of an over-zealous fret dressing I guess I'll never know (but I suspect it was the latter.) Neck binding has never been very important to me, but in this case, with the nibs, it cuts into the playable fret area and negatively affects the playability of the guitar. Not only that, you can feel and hear the transition between the metal fret and plastic binding nib, so you hear a minute *click* before the squawk of the string as it goes completely overboard. I suspect that there's no real solution except what @larry1096 suggested earlier, which is a refret, IOW, the damage is already done. So, the question becomes, do I live with it as I have for several years, or spring for a refret that would cost a significant percentage of the price I paid for the thing, or sell it and try again?

As I said in post #1, I really love the sound of the thing. Gibson P90s have mucho macho mojo. However, I have had some mounting issues with the basic design of the SG, so I'm wondering if another form factor with P90s might be the ultimate solution. A Les Paul Special or such, maybe.
As someone said before, you could send it to s tech do a refret, cut the nibs and extend the frets over the binding. But you' ll have to think if it is worth it $$$. If you like how it sounds and plays (other than high E vibrato), I think it could be a killer guitar.

Or sell it. Only you can know.
 

hunter

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,576
You should be able to replace the saddles cheaply. I would do all of them. Use a proper ruler to space the strings. Be sure they’re aligned where you want them. I use a plastic mallet to just tap the string into the saddle, which I believe is what Faber recommends. Works like a charm and only sets you back the cost of the saddles. Worst case, you hate it worse or misalign them and you just put the old saddles back on.
Look carefully at the pics. It appears the frets closer to the nut are the more rounded off frets. And there isn't much room on the big E side. Moving strings over on the saddle will barely move strings at the 5th fret. It may be enough but maybe not. Probably get a better result with a new reslotted nut. But it will still be close I think.
 

J Factor

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,178
I suspect a replacement saddle and nut could counter that without issue.

Hello! And a 2100 dollar guitar to boot..
The difference there is that a little tweak to the neck angle towards the bass side could potentially sort that out completely, without any cost of materials or professional labor.
 

Gevalt

Member
Messages
1,940
The Jaguar can be corrected with the threaded saddles it appears to have. The grooves give custom spacing, to a point.
It's the hole spacing on the pickup covers that sticks out to me.
 

ArthurS

Member
Messages
108
It’s not entirely uncommon. In fact, it’s why Gibson ditched the nibs and slightly widened the necks on their guitars in 2015. We all know how enthusiastic people responded to these changes...

To me it doesn’t look like there is anything really wrong with the string alignment. But if it bothers you, you could try any of the suggestions above. Or try and score a 2015 SG ;)
 

larry1096

Member
Messages
1,350
It’s not entirely uncommon. In fact, it’s why Gibson ditched the nibs and slightly widened the necks on their guitars in 2015. We all know how enthusiastic people responded to these changes...

To me it doesn’t look like there is anything really wrong with the string alignment. But if it bothers you, you could try any of the suggestions above. Or try and score a 2015 SG ;)
And then refret it because the frets are SOOO low. :(

(Ask me how I know...)

Larry
 

mc5nrg

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,915
The Fender you all are upset about just needs a tug on the neck to better align the strings over the fretboard- known in the trade as the "Fender neck adjustment".
 




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