High quality guitars with skinny nuts?????

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by The_Bell, Feb 14, 2020.

  1. ieso

    ieso Member

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    The G&L "Classic C" is fantastic. "This is the profile most G&L fans associate with the post 2000 era. 1 5/8” nut width, slight edge roll, medium taper from 0.830” to 0.960”. It starts off fairly slim and gets beefier up the neck. These specs were part of the #1 neck."
     
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  2. FiestaRed869

    FiestaRed869 Member

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    All my strats (4 of them) are MJT partcasters with Musikraft 1.625 nut width nuts. I love them. When I went down this rabbit hole I discovered a lot of things. One was the “proper” string spacing for my 1.625 nut was the same sting spacing fender uses for their 1.650 nuts which I thought was weird. By proper I mean the widest possible with no fall off. All my guitars have vintage wide bridge spacing , and about 1.375 spacing E to E and I don’t get any fall off and the strings aren’t cramped. You could slightly wider but that’s what I like .
     
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  3. Baxtercat

    Baxtercat Member

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    Aren't most old Fenders [w/ standard B necks] 1 & 5/8? [for example my lifelong '63 Strat].
    That's like 41.3 mm, so it's not an uncommon width.
     
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  4. Guitarwiz007

    Guitarwiz007 Silver Supporting Member

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    EBMM for sure. My LIII is divine. Custom Suhr is in the can't go wrong category.
     
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  5. speedyone

    speedyone Member

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    When I was younger (teens and twenties,) I LOVED really tight string spacing/skinny nuts.

    However, our hands keep getting larger as we get older, and now that I’m almost 50 I can NOT play those types of guitars anymore!

    I could barely play on an Ernie Ball music man I tried out.

    When I was young, I hated how wide Ibanez’ string spacing was, and it felt crippling to my playing technique. But now, it feels GOOD to me.

    I can’t believe Yngwie can STILL play on those little Strat necks.... He’s a tall/big guy, and his hands gave surely grown too with age....
     
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  6. Ridgeback

    Ridgeback Member

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    My Grosh Retro Classic Custom has a 1 5\8" nut width.
     
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  7. The_Bell

    The_Bell Member

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    Nice call (and agreed regarding their MII or made-anywhere-by-Yamaha quality in general), I kinda wish their SG or Revstar had a similar option for the neck but such is life.
     
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  8. The_Bell

    The_Bell Member

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    I think we have similar preferences.
     
  9. Borealis

    Borealis Supporting Member

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    I believe most James Tyler models are 1 5/8.
     
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  10. Rotten

    Rotten Silver Supporting Member

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    Not sure why G&L moved away from the #1 as its standard. That is a great neck. For the OP, late '60s and early '70s 335s, and I believe other Gibson hollow bodies, had a 1/9/16" neck. My 335 has a feel that is really nice in certain contexts.
     
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  11. Freedom

    Freedom Member

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    Fender Japan RI68's strats have 40mm nuts for sure.
     
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  12. jvin248

    jvin248 Member

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    .

    It may not be the nut width, it's hard to tell the difference between 1-2mm difference by feel, but more of the carve shape that gets you that narrow.

    I know you said excluding Squier Affinity but they have a C carve that starts from the leading edge of the fretboard and cuts back, giving an acute angle across the sides of the fretboard and removing a lot of the rear shoulders on the neck. Circumference is much smaller compared to a MIM/MIA (or many non-Fender starter guitars) and those all have fretboard edges that are square to the face and the C carve starts behind the fretboard glue line.

    I've stopped buying Squiers new/used to play because of that carve design. Some of the older MIC necks varied and you'd get a chunkier one. The newer MII necks are too repeatable (higher manufacturing quality) and adhere closer to Fender's skinny neck demands. So I buy Strat-Like-Objects instead.

    In any event, check out the Squier Affinity necks and see if it's the carve you like about your current guitar or just the narrowness.

    .
     
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  13. The_Bell

    The_Bell Member

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    Thanks @jvin248

    Aside from the Fernandes, which is a bit unusual for what I usually play (in addition to the nut it has a flatter board), the necks that get the most play are:

    - MIM 94 Squier Series - 9.5 with a slim-ish C.
    - Allparts SMO 21 (medium C, 7.25)
    - Older MIM 60s (medium C, 7.25)

    Just a theory, but I think maybe the narrower nut on the Fernandes makes the flatter board a bit more comfortable.

    I roll the edges on my keeper strats. I've played quite a few Affinities, my favorites are actually the older Chinese ones when they first started the series (I've owned 3 from 98, still have one). I have never really gotten along with MII Squiers, not sure why.
     
  14. MBreinin

    MBreinin Supporting Member

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    Newburgh era Steinbergers have a 1 5/8 nut. You would be hard pressed to find a more comfortable neck.
     
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  15. Corvid

    Corvid Member

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    Re: MIJ Fenders, I think a lot of them used to come with 40 or 41 mm nuts. I think their 70s reissue strat (with the three bolt neck plate with tilt-o-matic) had a 41 or 40 mm nut, and I know the 70s-style Mustang (MG73) had a 40 mm nut, but I just checked the current MIJ Fender offerings in Japan, and most MIJ Fenders now have 42 mm nuts or, in the case of the Made in Japan Modern series, 42.5 mm!

    I only found three MIJ models with narrow nuts listed on Fender's Japanese website: the Made in Japan Hybrid 68 Stratocaster (41.5 mm nut, 250 mm/9.84 inch radius), Yngwie Malmsteen Stratocaster (40 mm nut, 240 mm/9.45 inch radius), and the Char Mustang (41.02 mm nut, 241 mm/9.5 inch radius).

    I really want that Char Mustang - it's got a strat-style tremolo.
     
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  16. jalmer

    jalmer Member

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    '85 MIJ Squier Contemporary Strat- 24 3/4" scale, 40mm nut.
     
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  17. K-Line

    K-Line Vendor

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    We can do 1.625"
     
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  18. The_Bell

    The_Bell Member

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    Thanks. I have heard absolutely 100% good things about you BTW. Not a single remark otherwise, which is rare these days.
     
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  19. Jdstrat

    Jdstrat Silver Supporting Member

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    I might have bought a Yamaha 611 a couple years ago, but for the 41mm nut. I have never run into one in a guitar store, so I don’t really know whether it would bug me or not. Everything else I have is 42-43mm. If I could stretch every nut to 1.75” I would.
     
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