High wall voltage and new vs. vintage power transformer

joeriz

Member
Messages
28
Hi all,

This is a bit of a basic question but I'm wondering: If a new power transformer (which would presumably be rated to deal with 120v wall voltage) were substituted for a vintage one (which was presumably rated to deal with wall voltage between 110 and 115v), would this bring voltages in the amp back in line with where they were designed to be? For example, if I replaced a vintage power transformer in a Deluxe Reverb with a new production replacement one designed to have the correct voltages for a Deluxe Reverb on the secondary/output side, would this lower internal voltages in the amp (e.g. preamp voltages) back to where they should be? I have to believe the answer is 'yes' but wanted to ask those more knowledgeable than me.

BTW - I understand that this is not something someone should do 'just because' as it could potentially devalue a vintage amp and may not be worthwhile from a cost/benefit perspective. I also understand that lowering internal voltages could be more easily achieved by using a variac or bucking transformer. (In fact, that probably answers my question right there.)

Thanks!
 
Messages
6,845
IF the new PT were designed to yield the 'vintage' voltages on the secondary windings with wall AC at 'modern' wall voltages, then yes the PT will yield those desired 'vintage' voltages....as long as the wall voltage is at the 'modern' voltage, which is in many cases 123-125VAC. But....in times of high demand on the electrical grid, those wall voltages will change. IN the summer around here, I have observed 123VAC in the morning. By the time the sun was beating down and all of the air conditioners in everyone's homes and businesses were pumping to beat 105 degree summer heat, that wall voltage was at 111vac.
 

joeriz

Member
Messages
28
IF the new PT were designed to yield the 'vintage' voltages on the secondary windings with wall AC at 'modern' wall voltages, then yes the PT will yield those desired 'vintage' voltages....as long as the wall voltage is at the 'modern' voltage, which is in many cases 123-125VAC. But....in times of high demand on the electrical grid, those wall voltages will change. IN the summer around here, I have observed 123VAC in the morning. By the time the sun was beating down and all of the air conditioners in everyone's homes and businesses were pumping to beat 105 degree summer heat, that wall voltage was at 111vac.

Thanks!
 

swiveltung

Member
Messages
14,483
Weber sells PT's with two different taps for wall voltage. One tap reduces the amp voltage so the amp runs closer to vintage voltages internally.
 




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