Higher 'Output' Bridge Pickup - Fatter Coil or Deeper Coil?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by Deed_Poll, Jan 29, 2019.

  1. Deed_Poll

    Deed_Poll Member

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    I'm in the exciting position of having almost finished designing the bobbins and covers for a three-pickup (single coil) guitar to send them off to Marc at Mojo Pickups (UK) for winding.

    My philosophy was to try and bridge the gap between a Jazzmaster coil and a Strat coil, making it flatter and broader than a Strat but taller than a Jazzmaster.

    When I think of an ''overwound bridge pickup" I usually think of the same depth of bobbin wound more times, i.e. closer to capacity. Fatter, broader, wider. But not deeper.

    I might be wrong in this assumption! The Telecaster bridge pickup IIRC is significantly deeper and wider, and has a ''baseplate' so is in many ways a very different animal from the neck.

    Anyway I wonder whether the balance might be achieved in a similar but different way by keeping the coil the same 'width', but making it deeper for the bridge pickup? Has anyone tried this?

    Cheers!
     
  2. Deed_Poll

    Deed_Poll Member

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    Thanks for the link! Very interesting.
    "Take a look at a bunch of vintage and modern Strat pickups, and you will notice that the extent to which the slugs protrude beyond the plastic covers varies a great deal. Assuming the slugs are all the same length, this indicates that the gap between the two flats must vary.

    It follows that if two coils are wound to the same DC resistance onto two pickups with different flat spacing, the coils will have different shapes. The wide-spaced flats will have a tall and narrow coil and the narrow-spaced flats will have the wider coil.

    Jason Lollar explains: “You can get quite a different tone out of a Strat pickup by making the coil a little bit shorter or a little bit taller. It makes a measurable difference. You can hear the difference in as little as a 32nd of an inch.” Generally, a wider coil will sound fatter and thicker, but the treble may be softened. A taller coil can sound clearer, brighter and more defined."
     
  3. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    why would anybody assume that?

    the magnet slugs can be all sorts of different heights. (the coils are too, so the original point is not lost, but magnet pole thickness and length is yet another variable).

    hell, staggered pickups have different length slugs in the same coil.
     
  4. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    for a while there, somebody (help me out here) was making a single coil pickup that actually got wider under the treble strings and narrower under the bass strings! it was like the width and flatness of a jazzmaster coil under the hi E tapering to the the shape of a tall narrow tele coil under the lo E, i suppose with the goal of fatter, fuller plain strings and tighter, twangier low strings.

    if you had bobbin plates that were close together around the hi E magnet and farther apart around the low E magnet, i guess that's how the coil would turn out.
     
    massacre likes this.

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