Highly “tweakable” Pedals

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by KyJeff, Aug 14, 2019.

Tags:
  1. KyJeff

    KyJeff Member

    Messages:
    31
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2019
    Hi Everyone. Been playing for a long time. Have never bothered with pedals. I’m getting more interested in them. Is there a general consensus on multiple pedals on a board that have a lot of controls such as the clean boost tc electronic spark. I have a feeling I’ll end up with a decent amount of pedals. I get it’s all subjective, over all Is better off going with pedals that are simpler if you are running multiple pedals? thanks for your input.
     
  2. Gclef

    Gclef Member

    Messages:
    1,521
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    I went from a tube screamer and a rat thru the front end of whatever amp I had at the time to both of those thru a set of bogner pedals into a small clean amp.
    I love all the switches on the bogners! I can find something that works well with all my guitars. Good or bad, it takes a while to really get the most out of a switch/option heavy pedal.
    I like to be able to shape my base sound, so more switches here.

    I prefer my boosts to be simple.
     
    JmpOne and KyJeff like this.
  3. captaincoconut

    captaincoconut Member

    Messages:
    1,871
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2014
    If it has more than three knobs I'm not interested. The main concern is to be able to recreate my settings in a live situation as fast as possible.
     
    Big in Japan, Jack DeVille and KyJeff like this.
  4. thefruitfarmer

    thefruitfarmer Member

    Messages:
    23
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2019
    Location:
    Kent UK


    Depends how you think about your pedals really ....



    Some people like 3 knobs max and some like to have a pedal with menus and presets so they can call up presets live. Personally I reckon on many pedals doing less things gives a better sound than fewer complex pedals covering all the options, although that applies more to compressors and drives rather than modulations, delays and reverbs.



    Get yourself a board and power supply for about 10 pedals, any more than that is too heavy to lift. I have a T-rex tonetrunk 56 arriving today as I already have one of their power supplies and brackets that only seems to fit to a T-rex board. If you don't want to splash out on a board this big at least get a decent small power supply like a t-rex junior or something to start off with.



    Then go for pedals to build a basic tone, one or two drive pedals and a compressor if you need one, a pedal tuner is usually a good idea as is an EQ pedal.



    After that, think about modulations, delays and reverb. Choose ones you like the sound of. I like chorus, but that is not everyone's cup of tea. I have one pedal that does only slapback but your needs may differ. This is where the complex/simple choice comes into play - you could get a Small Clone chorus if you really like that specific sound or you could have a Strymon or Boss 500 if you want something with presets and tricks. If you are not sure then get a small multi effect to find out what you do like.



    Get the pedals gradually, some of them have a learning curve. Eventually, you might find a chain of more than five pedals results in a tone suck so you could then need a Boss LS-2 or something to shorten the chain.



    Best of luck with your search, it is great having a set of extra sounds at your feet.
     
    KyJeff and Vaibhav Joshi like this.
  5. Jaguar

    Jaguar Member

    Messages:
    235
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2019
    Location:
    Amsterdam
    I think the TC electronic Spark booster is a very nice pedal to start with. I like that kind of lay out (4 knobs, 1 switch), very flexible but no option paralysis. It goes from really clean boost to color boost, to dirty boost up to OD. Love that pedal! And about the highly tweakable I might add I like highly tweakable but not to tweak a lot to find a good sound. I like pedals that are highly tweakable but are hard to dial a bad sound in with. That combination does it for me.

    Enjoy the pedal-adventure!
     
    KyJeff likes this.
  6. Pazz

    Pazz Member

    Messages:
    776
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2014
    Location:
    Florida
    Well obviously the Amptweaker line would be of interest to you. They sound great, have a lot of ways to “tweak” the sound and, with all the loop options, they are a great base to built a pedal board on.

    Also, the current run of Barber pedals have three knobs and two toggle switches and use them to get a wide range of tones.

    Good luck. Welcome to the obsession.
     
    KyJeff likes this.
  7. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

    Messages:
    19,453
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2005
    Location:
    under the stars
    Totally depends on the pedal and what I want to use it for.

    With OD, I way prefer simple. Had a Dumble style pedal with all kinds of settings (matching the many on Dumble amps) and it was way too much for me. Because many (actually, almost all) interact with each other. Add gain and the EQ changes, change the EQ and gain changes, etc.
    basically what captaincoconut said.

    On other pedals, still prefer minimal, or such s the El Capistan, where I set the secondary features and pretty much leave it at that and only really change the mix, delay time, and type on the fly.

    But I do get a kick out of more tweakable pedals at home sometimes. It’s fun to play around with and if I get a killer sound at some point, take a photo of the settings and maybe would use at a gig.
    It’s not a hard and fast rule, I like both but for different applications. And I break my “rules” when it is worth it.
     
    KyJeff likes this.
  8. Naigewron

    Naigewron Member

    Messages:
    672
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2017
    I usually don't like pedals with too much control (single tone pot suits me fine), but I really do love my Rockaway Archer

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Stratburst70

    Stratburst70 Member

    Messages:
    4,672
    Joined:
    May 25, 2013
    It really depends on the situation and your amp. Overall, I prefer to have options especially if you’re trying to get a good sound in a crowded mix.

    For instance, I really like the Wampler Tweed ‘57 to add midrange and overdrive while shaving some bass from my Fender Princeton. The 3-band EQ is great in that scenario.

    That said, it’s possible that you get thrown by too many controls. I once had a gig with a 6-piece blues band where the bassist was struggling with the parametric EQ on his amp. At one point, he called on the transgendered sound engineer for help. She marched onstage, flatlined his EQ and said, “Now you sound good.”
     
    KyJeff likes this.
  10. Vaibhav Joshi

    Vaibhav Joshi Member

    Messages:
    1,638
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2019
    I think with most pedals, you find a setting & stick to it. I'm assuming this.
    A simple/complex pedal will just affect how much you can tweak. But eventually you find something & stick to it for some time.
    So, the only time simple/complex pedals is a question is when you want to dial it in on the spot & very quickly. But even for that once you understand how the controls work, even a complicated one may be easy enough to work with.

    I was reading on the Fromel Shape EQ vs Empress EQ. Fromel is preferred for the simplicity & Empress for the tweaking power. Once you spend time with the pedal, I don't think it matters so much.
     
    guff, KyJeff and thefruitfarmer like this.
  11. JosephZdyrski

    JosephZdyrski Member

    Messages:
    1,652
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2019
    My Walrus Slo has so many things that are adjustable I often forget all the possibilities it has until I bring it to my parents house on the occasional weekend and dive into it and find some cool new settings.
     
    KyJeff and Vaibhav Joshi like this.
  12. Jazzandmore

    Jazzandmore Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    8,353
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2011
    Location:
    Cali
    I love tweakable, but I much prefer it to be knobs and switches and not having to access sub functions. Not sure why I’m like that.
     
  13. McGTR

    McGTR Member

    Messages:
    133
    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2019
    Location:
    Europe
    To me that parameter doesnt matter, its not rocket science either way. What matters is if the pedal is useful in concrete scenarios and if it sounds great. Good usually doesnt cut it, the pedal needs to have something special going for it.
     
    KyJeff and thefruitfarmer like this.
  14. eclecticsynergy

    eclecticsynergy Member

    Messages:
    5,415
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2015
    Location:
    NY
    If you depend on pedals for your core tone and the backlines can vary, you might want some extra flexibility. Otherwise, simpler is usually better IMO.
    I have several drive pedals that are fairly complex, but I got them for tone, not versatility.

    I feel the same way about guitar wiring - used to think more options were better, then realized nearly all my playing was done using just a scant handful.
     
    KyJeff likes this.
  15. KyJeff

    KyJeff Member

    Messages:
    31
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2019

    Great input. Thank you!
     
    thefruitfarmer likes this.
  16. KyJeff

    KyJeff Member

    Messages:
    31
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2019
    Got one on the way!
     
    Jaguar likes this.
  17. Big in Japan

    Big in Japan Member

    Messages:
    674
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2018
    To each his/her own. I used to think that I wanted a 3-band EQ on every drive pedal. Then I got turned onto Lovepedal. 4, 3, 2, 1 knob: it doesn't matter. I can't get bad sounds out of them. A well, voiced pedal doesn't need a lot of knobs.

    But again, to each his/her own. Have fun on the journey.
     
  18. jnepo1

    jnepo1 Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    13,860
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2009
    Location:
    Sutton, MA
    I like to tweak when I first get a pedal. I want to be able to see/discover what the pedal can do in different scenarios such as rhythm and lead playing and stacking pedals as well as thru different amps. That said, I don’t switch out pedals on my board much once I’ve found a pedal(s) that I like. If they can cover a lot of ground, that’s a big plus especially when doing studio work.

    One of my favorite drive pedals that have been on my board since it’s release is the Ethos TWE-1. It can do so much totally and stacks very well with other drive pedals.
     
    KyJeff likes this.
  19. Sloppyslim

    Sloppyslim Member

    Messages:
    248
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2008
    Location:
    sandy eggo
    find some old fart with an over flowing pedal collection, bring some beers and let them start bragging...
    a few beers in and you should get some hands on :anon
     
    KyJeff likes this.
  20. lefort_1

    lefort_1 Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    13,563
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2012
    Location:
    Oregon
    For me
    - If it's not on the surface, it's not adjustable in the live setting, by mere mortals.
    - Menus are for setting up, not for accessibility.
    - same goes with banks, afaic.

    That said, I am absolutely in favor of knobs and switches.
     
    KyJeff likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice