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Hipshot Tremsetter? Does it work well?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by atomheartmother, Oct 17, 2005.

  1. atomheartmother

    atomheartmother Senior Member

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    What's the deal with this Hipshot Tremsetter? My Strat has a MIA Standard trem in it. I like how they feel, but HATE flutter. Does this get rid of flutter? What else does it help with?

    Any drawbacks?
     
  2. Riscchip

    Riscchip Member

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    If you are smart about setting it up, it works pretty much as designed. It basically keeps the bridge stable when you bend strings so that they stay in tune with eachother. I've had a few guitars with them and they've worked great.
     
  3. Slipjack

    Slipjack Member

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    I've heard people say that it feels weird when you let up on the trem bar to let it go back into position. Like it snaps back into place toward the end of the motion.

    I've never tried one, but I've heard something similar to that. I think the Tremol-No will be a better idea once it's available to ship -- which is rumored to be soon.
     
  4. Kevan

    Kevan Member

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    Thanks for the nod, SlipJack. I appreciate it.

    If you guys have any questions about the Tremol-No, feel free to email me. There are also a couple of threads here on the forum; a quick search for 'Tremol-No' in the title and you'll see them. I'd be happy to answer questions there as well.

    I'm going as fast as I can to get the Tremol-No out to you guys. It shouldn't be too much longer. Thanks for hangin' with me.


    In regards to the TremSetter, it's a slightly different device than the Tremol-No. The TremSetter is spring loaded, so you will 'feel' it when you use your trem. In my testing, the detent (zero position) drove me nuts when using my trem. For some, that's not a big deal; for others they'll hate it. If I set up the device to pull me back in tune after a string break, the detent was quite noticable.

    The TremSetter isn't made for locking down the bridge. It's more like a shock absorber- the "shock" being a string break. Though in my testing, I've had mixed results with it returning my tuning.

    So, depending on what you want your trem to do, choose the right device for the job. And, as always, your mileage may vary. :D
     
  5. stratovarius

    stratovarius Supporting Member

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    Yes it takes care of flutter and also works to counteract string bending force (when you bend, the whole guitar can go out of tune).

    The downside is that they're a little tricky to set up and they do add some stiffness to whammy bar usage. I only find this to be a problem when passing through the center point (like whammying up and then down in quick succession). You'll notice a bit of a hangup as you pass through the center point. This may bother some people but it still works just fine.
     
  6. cvansickle

    cvansickle Supporting Member

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    I have the HipShot in my current Strat, and I've used it on two other guitars in the past, a G&L Legacy and an Ibanez RG750. It does add some stiffness, but it's not a solid stabilzer. If you break a string with the Hipshot, the bridge will stll pull the others sharp. In setting up the Tremsetter, you have to adjust it for the balance between spring tension and string tension.

    What the HipShot does well is it sets a zero point, so as you bend up or down, the bridge will get back in tune at the zero point when you release it. Combined with locking tuners, it's almost foolproof.
     
  7. Unburst

    Unburst Member

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    Exactly what I didn't like about it too.

    Also it seemed to have a dampening effect on the strings, I could definitely hear a difference after installing it, and not a good one either.
     
  8. HarryJ

    HarryJ Member

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    I also have the tremsetter on a couple guitars.
    I do find that for it to really be effective with double stop and triple stop bends, you have to set it so the bar is very stiff. tough trade off. It becomes difficult to get a smooth vibrato

    I do have a question about this new device you are talking about, the tremol-no

    Will you have to retune when in locked position, or will it lock in the exact floating position so it will remain in tune?

    Harry JAcobson
    www.harryj.net
     
  9. Kevan

    Kevan Member

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    This was one of my hang-ups as well. On vintage trems I didn't mind it so much. But on the full floater I tested on, it drove me batty.
    Some folks don't mind it, and that's cool. I personally could never play like that.

    The Tremol-No is 100% manual. You turn it on and you turn it off. There are no springs or detents on the Tremol-No, so wherever your tuning is currently, that's where the bridge is locked.
    There are now videos up on the website. Check them out for more information: http://www.tremol-no.com/videos.asp
    If you have any other questions, please email me and I'd be happy to answer them for you.
     
  10. Slipjack

    Slipjack Member

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    Thanks for the heads up on the demonstration video Kevan. It's far less complicated than I thought, and it looked fairly simple before I saw the video. Nice quality video too.

    If you aren't already rolling in the benjamins, Kevan, you will soon. Awesome invention -- I'm getting two of those when I can.
     
  11. Kevan

    Kevan Member

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    Thanks Slipjack. I'm glad you liked the video. No Benjamin's yet. Not even any Washington's. :D

    If you guys have Tremol-No questions, there are a couple of threads on this forum, or you can post on the Tremol-No forum, or simply email me.

    I don't want to take away from the original posters question, so let's re-rail this thread back to TremSetter stuff.
    Thanks.
     
  12. cvansickle

    cvansickle Supporting Member

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    I watched the Tremol-No video, and I must be missing something. Does the Tremol-No have a set "zero point" that the bridge always comes back to in floating mode? It looks as if in floating mode the bridge works like it would if the Tremol-No were not installed. If there is a zero point, it wasn't obvious to me. That is one of the benefits for me with the HipShot.
     
  13. HarryJ

    HarryJ Member

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    I thought the video was very clear...Let me see if I understood the video enough to try to tackle that question...

    It looked to me that in full floating mode, the tremel-no is not really in the picture. The bridge works as it originally did. Although the extra metal of the unit itself may have some secondary benefits in terms of sustain?

    In hard tail mode, it freezes the position of the bridge in the spot that was in tune.

    In dive only mode... errr....well it only dives.

    It also looked like in dive only mode, you can have a lower string tension than standard, so drop tunings remain in tune.

    I'm thinkin' hummm... maybe I could use open G tuning for slide and now have 2 tools to approach notes with, the bar and the slide. That opens up some very cool possibilities for pedal steel ideas!

    Did I get it right kinna?

    The previous poster was assuming that the tremol-no works like the tremsetter.

    I can absolutely say that the tremsetters currently in my guitars will be takin' a ride out 'da window :)

    Harry Jacobson
    www.harryj.net
     
  14. lanesmat

    lanesmat Member

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    I installed a tremsetter on one of my Strats. I run my Strats with a stiff trem setting (5 springs), so removing one spring to add the tremsetter was no significant difference. Here's my take on using it:

    The trem does have a "centered" feel, but moreso if you use a light-effort trem (e.g. few springs) with light strings. It does have a different feel and will take a little getting used to. IMO, the stock trem is easier to use, but what you gain in using the tremsetter outweighs this disadvantage.

    1. Bends don't make the other strings sound flat
    2. I can rest my hand on the bridge without affecting tuning
    3. Tuning is easier and more stable
    4. String bending is easier since you do not have to compensate for trem springs stretching
    5. Once set up, you won't have to fool with it again unless you mess with different string gauges.

    I personally like it. I had to adjust it for a week or so to be completely happy with it, so patience helps. My favorite aspect of the unit is that I can do killer bends with medium strings without having so much stretch. YMMV.

    Scott L.
     
  15. Kevan

    Kevan Member

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    There is no "zero point" or detent (bump, notch, etc) with the Tremol-No. Wherever your trem was set before, that's where it'll be set after installation. Unless you're in Hardtail or Dive Only mode, you won't feel it in the guitar. At all.

    HarryJ's post has all correct points.
    The pedal steel/country chop guys can now play full floating Floyd-equipped guitars! Heh heh...sorry, funny images pop into my head when I think about that.

    Lanesmat- Good to hear the TremSetter is workin' for ya. Some people like blondes, some like redheads, and some think Martha Stewart in a Brazillian bikini is really hot.
    Thankfully we have options for all those.
     
  16. SgtThump

    SgtThump Member

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    That guys has three arms and hands! COOL!
     
  17. Slipjack

    Slipjack Member

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    Think? Dude, I KNOW. Martha should be asked to do Playboy. ;)

    Disclaimer: In the event that the reader of this post did not interpret the message with the intended amount of sarcasm, please note that I just chucked on my keyboard when I wrote it.

    To get back on track; how well would the TremSetter work for someone who plays blues with a lot of double stops and bends but doesn't really use the whammy bar that often if at all?
     
  18. John Phillips

    John Phillips Member

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    I have the Trem-Setter set up slightly different from most or all of the previous posters... I have it purely to prevent detuning after a string break, not to stop the double-stop-bend issue (which doesn't bother me). I have it set precisely at the point of float going downwards - so you can't even feel it's there - and extremely stiff going up, with the center spring cranked as tight as it will go.

    It works perfectly like that, for how I use it. I very rarely pull up, so most of the time it feels just like a normal floating trem. When I do want to pull up, it's for an exaggerated special effect, so I don't really mind the stiff feel, and it doesn't bother me either (I never vibrato 'around' the rest point, which it would certainly prevent from being smooth as Martin said).

    I do think it changes the tone slightly too, but actually in a good way; and it does definitely work to stop detuning after a break, although you do have to set it up really stiffly to achieve good stability. Even then it isn't quite perfect, but the remaining detuning is caused by the neck moving, so there's nothing that can be done about that... and it's good enough to get me to the end of the song.

    I like the 'set and forget' nature of the Trem-Setter - I've never had to adjust mine since I fitted them, and they allow the whole range of what I want to do with a trem without having to touch anything on the back of the guitar; most of the time I don't even think about them being there. And yet they still operate automatically when needed without even affecting my playing... so I've no plans to replace them. I may want to fit a Tremol-No on my old Strat though, since the Trem-Setter does still require drilling.

    BTW, it's much easier to set up and adjust the Trem-Setter if you throw away those stupid little spring hooks they give you and make a proper one like this...
    [​IMG]
     
  19. Kevan

    Kevan Member

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    John- great observations. As it's been stated before, the TremSetter works for some and won't work for others; and the same with the Tremol-No. That's how the world works. :) I think a lot of it depends on your playing habits and style, and what you need your tremolo unit to do. That will be the deciding factor for many.

    The Automatic/Always On versus Manual On/Off can be debated for ages. Again, I think it comes down to what the player needs and wants from his trem unit. Some hardcore blues guy might want to lock down his PRS trem for a recording session, but have his trem back for the live show that night; and their hardcore blues buddy might just want something to help the trem return to zero after a string break and could care less about recording. Of course, there are tons of other scenarios that can be set up.

    I really like your modified trem claw (I remember it from the other thread). If you need any spare claws, let me know. I have about 30 here. LOL

    For those that want to try a TremSetter + Tremol-No setup, there are a couple of 'short frame' TremSetter-type devices out there now. One is the "Arming Adjuster" from ESP, and I saw another one recently called the TremSetter-2. These little guys will most likely work with a Tremol-No-equipped guitar running 3 springs, but just to let you know....they do require drilling into the body.

    I haven't done any testing with any of the short-frame guys yet, sorry. I have this habit of not drilling into multi-thousand dollar guitars.
    :D
     
  20. John Phillips

    John Phillips Member

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    Exactly. The most important things to know about all these gadgets are actually what they don't do. I think a lot of people give them a bad rap because they expect them to do things that they can't, and don't understand that they're all just different sets of compromises (as is a fully-floating bridge, too), some of which will work for you and some of which won't. So when they don't cure all the ills of the world at one go, they decide the product is no good...

    The commonest one I hear about the Trem-Setter is that it will "cure tuning problems" on a guitar which won't stay in tune - whereas it will actually make things worse if the guitar won't already return to pitch properly by itself... and that's even before the various ways in which you can set it up badly. I've had a lot of people ask me to remove them from things like Strat Plus's (which is where I got both of mine from, from guys that simply wanted rid of them and sold them to me). But I can't remember finding one that was set up really well beforehand, and a fair number of the owners actually changed their minds once they were convinced it could work much better.

    The reason I got into them is because I really wanted to use a guitar with a trem, and I cannot tolerate a string break putting me out of tune or really even interrupting playing, since I'm the only guitarist in my band. And I wanted to avoid blocking the trem to down-only if possible. Equally, I hate the 'notch' when going down too, so I had to learn my own way of adjusting it to avoid that... although that means it doesn't cure the double-stop detuning. You can't have it all ways at once, basically :).
     

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