hitting a wall

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by MikeyST, Jan 23, 2008.


  1. MikeyST

    MikeyST Member

    Messages:
    74
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2007
    Any of you more experienced guys ever hit a wall as far as learning more.

    Older guy here. Play blues almost totally by ear. Pretty decent. But I get stuck in ruts where I play teh same comfortable stuff and it gets to feel stale.
    How do you guys break out of that?
     
  2. Aj_rocker

    Aj_rocker Member

    Messages:
    1,270
    Joined:
    May 13, 2006
    Location:
    Bath, Uk
    listening to people better than me!!!

    Aj
     
  3. rosscoep

    rosscoep Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2007
    Location:
    PDX
    I'll change to an alternate tuning. Pretty tough to rely on muscle memory the first time you play in dadgad. Alternate tuning with capo works too. New effects sometimes. A zvex seekwah type efffect or panning delay or some zany modulation works. I read that Jim Hall used to rubber-band two strings together to mute em'. Muscle memory can be a real bummer for pattern/box type playing. Lately I've attempted to deny myself the pleasure of playing a tired old riff when I plug in and force myself to slow down and play hard stretching chords. Expanding into different genres is great too. Good luck.
     
  4. mcuguitar

    mcuguitar Gold Supporting Member Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,354
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Location:
    Idaho
    Hitting a wall is natural for most players. But if you know how and what to practice, trust me, you'll never hit a wall! Take a lesson with the best guitarist in your area, and hopefully he can teach you a thing or two that will open some doors. If you live in Idaho, I'd teach you, but short of that, I'd recommend several videos for you. Robben Ford videos, Carl Verheyen's video, John Scofield's video and George Benson's instructional video. Peace, Jon.
     
  5. gennation

    gennation Member

    Messages:
    6,667
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI
    I don't have too much of an issue with it.

    You can use the On Topic section at my lesson site: http://lessons.mikedodge.com to help you get some new views, moves, and practices.

    For Blues, the Advanced Pentatonic Tutorial will explain a new way of using a couple of little scales. It's not basic blues stuff, it helps you view things from a chromatic stand point. It might help clear up a few things for you too.
     
  6. shadowbox

    shadowbox Supporting Member

    Messages:
    555
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2007
    Location:
    The wild blue yonder....
    I began playing at age 8. I was one of those persons who would practice for 8 hrs. per day, etc. After playing devotedly for many years, and accomplishing a great deal, I hit a monumental wall. So: I found a very, very accomplished player, and got myself taken on as a student. We focused on theory, as I already had chops galore. These lessons, with their focus on theory, i.e., what works where and why, etc., changed everything for me and I rediscovered the passion and fire I had in the beginning.
     
  7. gainiac

    gainiac Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,147
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2004
    Location:
    Da Bronx
    Play some chord scales!

    Practice "6th" runs.

    Learn a song you like but wouldn't normally find yourself playing.
     
  8. bbarnard

    bbarnard Member

    Messages:
    3,632
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2003
    Location:
    FL
    I try and learn someone's solo note for note. And then find ways to use pieces of it in some other song. I ALWAY learn something when transcribing something. It's more of a a "how in the world did he even think of playing that" experience.
     
  9. Tag

    Tag Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    31,048
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2002
    Location:
    New Jersey
    If you are into blues and have hit a wall, loisten to the jazz players play the blues, and cop some of their lines. They use the "function" of the chord, and use dominant sounds instead of all tonic ones. (Playing just in the key) Listen to Robben Ford and Larry carlton play blues for starters, and then wes Montgomery and George benson. Learn their LINES AND LICKS, and MECHANICALLY FORCE them into your solos as soon as you have them digested. With a few weeks of doing this, they will become a natural part of your vocabulary, and you will start using only parts of them, and adding other parts. Then they are your own. Also, listen to how Ford and carlton use a swing rhythm in their playing, especially on the more advance lines. This will TOTALLY open your playing up.
     
  10. The Captain

    The Captain Member

    Messages:
    11,521
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    Location:
    Australia
    Listen to new music. If you can get around the vocals, there is a lot of great guitar playing out there today. Whether you like it is less important than whether it brings new ideas to you.
     

Share This Page