Hking/Camping

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by SixStringSlinger, Mar 21, 2015.

  1. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Member

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    Been thinking about getting into camping and hiking. Used to hike when i was younger, though I have never been camping. Came across some neat videos.


    This one is just a neat trailer video.


    Any of you have any regular spots that you enjoy?
     
  2. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Member

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    Heres a cool one VW put out.
     
  3. Steve Foley

    Steve Foley Member

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    I used to hit Yosemite a lot back in the 70's, but it's a super-highway, these days. If you haven't been before, it's incredible, but look for lots of folks.

    These days, I mostly hit Sequoia, Mineral King or Kings Canyon. You've got to know the right trails in Sequoia to avoid traffic.

    MK and KC are both fantastic, and not too crowded, but they both have some pretty winding roads, which is a problem for some with car-sickness. All trails start going up, and are relatively steep, in both parks, but that's ok - clears out the riff-raff. Both have great alpine lakes to camp at, within a day's walk, and trails continuing on from there, if you wish to make a week or two of it. Great scenery and varied landscape at all of these parks. No problem, usually, finding a camping site at Sequoia, MK, or KC, but you'll need to reserve ahead, often, at Yosemite.

    I haven't been in years, but the Appalachian Trail/Great Smokey Mtns used to have some fairly easy hiking, and super scenery, although it was getting crowded when I was last there, in the late 60's. I imagine it is probably a zoo, now, in the more popular tourist areas.
     
  4. lp_bruce

    lp_bruce Member

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    My wife and I hike and camp a lot. Normally, we camp/hike around the Great Lakes, hitting state or national parks or provincial parks in Ontario. We are tent campers and if we can hike in we do. We've camped out West and in the Appachian's too. The Smokies on the Carolina side has some pretty remote and rugged hike ins. Glacier has fantastic back country sites, though they aren't for the inexperienced.

    Peace,
     
  5. Nevets

    Nevets Supporting Member

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    I camp quite a bit in the spring and summer but mostly in a kayak, not hiking. And I've switched to a hammock instead of a tent. Nothing beats getting up on a sunny morning in the hammock on your own tiny little private island.
     
  6. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Starting to get into hiking myself but I'm paranoid about getting Lyme disease from tick bites.
     
  7. The Golden Boy

    The Golden Boy Member

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    When I was a kid I was into hiking and camping. My wife is NOT.

    I still have a desire to do that sort of stuff, but as long as wifey isn't into it- it's probably not going to happen.
     
  8. lp_bruce

    lp_bruce Member

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    That's a bummer. I didn't camp as a kid but got hooked when my son got involved in Scouts. We started with tents in the backyard and ended up doing 7-10 day back country hikes. My wife wasn't at all interested in camping when we got married (which was fine). Then about ten years ago she went to Peru for a mission trip, and living on the edge of the jungle in the back country of Peru is apparently an empowering experience. She came back game for any kind of nature adventure and we have been camping and hiking ever since. 3-4 times a year we hit local spots, then once a year we usually hit some place further afield. This year, we will likely camp/hike in and around Mount Rainier. Should be fun.

    Peace,
     
  9. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    We go in the Adirondacks every year. Really nice, but you've got to be prepared to be cold and wet for a few days - part of the deal up there.

    Before checked baggage rates became usurious, we used to have a duffle w/a tent and two sleeping bags that we'd check thru whenever we went on vacation.

    Stayed in some amazing places out west - much nicer, no bugs and very private, even car camping.
     
  10. 335guy

    335guy Member

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    I hiked and camped the high Sierras a lot in my younger days. It was all tent camping. The scenery and fishing were fantastic. There's quite a bit to learn about doing it safely. Learn as much as you can before heading out so you have an enjoyable time.
     
  11. derekd

    derekd Supporting Member

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    Spent lots of time in the CO and NM mountains. If you are backpacking, having good gear is a must.
     
  12. lefort_1

    lefort_1 Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt Gold Supporting Member

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    You know how this is going to end up, right?























    [​IMG]
     
  13. germanicus

    germanicus Member

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    Treat your clothes with Permethrin.

    It worked fantastic for me on sections of the AT last year. No ticks.
     
  14. mark norwine

    mark norwine Member

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    My daughter & I are climbing Mt. Katahdin this August. Not sure which approach we'll take to summit, but I'd like to do knife edge. Tomorrow I'm going to REI to look at new boots; the time to start breaking them in is *now*.

    My backpack is ready to go on a hike at any moment; it's never 'not ready'...
     
  15. Hwoltage

    Hwoltage Member

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    I'll bite!

    Pulling out 4 days, and 30 miles later.

    [​IMG]

    Camping on a sand bar.

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    A buddy with a smally, 3rd day in.

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    Cousin and a coworker setting up the crapper at deer camp.

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    Drinking beer in the main tent.

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    Looking for deer near Paulina, Oregon.

    [​IMG]

    Ochoco National Forest.

    [​IMG]

    Etc. :D
     
  16. germanicus

    germanicus Member

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    If you plan on doing backpacking, it really is worth it to get more expensive/lighter gear. You will probably end up getting it later on so its worth it to just get it at the start and save money.

    Take a look at the boutique tent makers. They are far better than what you get from REI/Walmart/DICK's etc.

    Companies like Tarptent, Six Moon Designs, Lightheart, or Zpacks makes super lightweight tents.
    Cuben fiber tents are the rolls royce of tents (Insanely lightweight and strong, but expensive), but you can still get Sil-Nylon designs that are spacious (will sleep 2+ people) and weigh under 40 ounces.

    Generally the same for backpacks, there are nice boutique (zpacks) shops. Osprey does make a lightweight pack thats pretty damn good (Osprey Exos).

    For Sleeping bags, a good goose down bag.

    High fill rate goose down bags will be lighter and pack much smaller than synthetics.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2015
  17. armadillo66

    armadillo66 Member

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    Eagles Nest Outfitter hammocks, a good sized tarp for rain fly over the hammocks, some mosquito net for each hammock, good sleeping bags, portable water drinking filter straws to lessen what we have to carry, Coleman Peak one stove, Two GI canteens with cups, a small wok shaped frying pan & eating utensils. Small Hatchet, & folding limb saw, Folding GI shovel, all other items and clothing bare essentials. Around here if you are around creeks, you can catch brook trout, crayfish and lots of wild edibles if you are savvy. If fire restrictions are not bad to comply with, we will usually prepare frozen aluminum foil entrees with say a marinaded ribeye, some sliced veggies and seasonings sealed up in broiling foil and frozen, if wrapped in bubble wrap & a towel, they will stay frozen for quite awhile.
    Minimal crap to carry means you can take along the metal detector and gold pans or bowhunting gear without killing yourself.
     
  18. mark norwine

    mark norwine Member

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    To my mind, they're still the best for size, portability & capacity.

    Good news: Nalgene now makes a exact-dimension GI-style.....no more nasty PVC flavor!

    [​IMG]


    Better still, I've found the most awesome "stove" for trail camping: A canteen & cup will fit into this "stove", so it takes up no additional pack space. Stick it in your fire, put your canteen cup on top, and in short order, you have hot food / water. You can order it at canteenshop.com

    [​IMG]

    Knives are such a personal thing, that I won't bother mentioning what I like. That said, I'd strongly suggest a fixed blade, because you simply can't baton with a folder. If you like a folder, fine.....but stick a robust fixed blade in your pack, too.

    EDIT: forgot....pack a small garden trowel. It makes the woods a happier place for other hikers. :) If you don't know what it's for, let me know.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2015
  19. germanicus

    germanicus Member

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    I just use a stick or my knife for a trowel.

    Check out the Sawyer mini water filter. You can use it to directly drink like a life straw, but its much better than the life straw for preparing water to carry (gravity will pull water through it fairly quickly).

    Alcohol stoves can be made out of a cat food can and are super compact and lightweight (lots of AT through hikers use this method). A good cheap small stove :
    http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Ba...&qid=1426984980&sr=8-3&keywords=pocket+rocket
     
  20. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Thanks for that tip. Will be sure to get Permethrin.
     

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