Home studio montor rig?

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by rkruz, Nov 23, 2004.

  1. rkruz

    rkruz Guest

    Im looking for a used set of near field monitors for my home studio.
    I can buy a rig with 2 Event 20/20, power amp Carvin f300 and speaker stands.

    Are the Event 20/20 good monitors for home studio purpose?

    The 300 watt amp is overkill but if its a good value I can make it work.

    What is the difference between a near field moniitor like the Event and just good quality passive home speakers?

    Looks like 275 for the rig. that about right? Or this all just overkill .?

    thanks for any input!
     
  2. heinz

    heinz Guest

    For me there's no more important piece of equipment than monitors, so no I don't think it's overkill.

    Any chance you can hear the monitor/amp combo before buying? The sound of monitors is extremely subjective.
     
  3. rkruz

    rkruz Guest

    thanks for that. yea. I should be able to hear them. Why use near fields versus just good home stereo speakers?
    .
     
  4. MichaelK

    MichaelK Member

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    Some home stereo speakers might be great monitors. I would guess (and I honestly don't know) that certain audiophile-grade stereo speakers could be great for the job. However, most are designed to sound "nice" as opposed to being designed to sound dead accurate, which is the job of monitors. You don't want them to be flattering, you want them to be honest and cruel, like my internist.

    Music these days is mixed to be heard primarily in cars, not on home stereos. There's much more compression and perceived loudness than on recordings made even 7 - 8 years ago. Nearfields are meant to be heard close up with a minimum of room reflections (thus the term "near field") while home stereo speakers are designed to be as pleasing as possible in a variety of atrocious acoustic environments. Which doesn't rule them out as monitors... I dunno, I'm just thinking about it as I type.

    The way to find out is to try them. If what you hear on your monitors translates well over a variety of playback systems – boom boxes, cars, little systems, big systems – that's what it's all about. If you find yourself running back and forth to fix things you're hearing on other systems that you couldn't hear on the monitors, then you need to look into better monitors.
     
  5. LSchefman

    LSchefman Member

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    >>you want them to be honest and cruel, like my internist<<

    Or my wife.

    (cymbal crash)

    Some home speakers make very good monitors. The horrible sounding Yamaha NS-10 that a lot of engineers still use was originally designed to be a home speaker. Some say that a mix that sounds good on NS-10s will sound good on anything. I don't necessarily agree, but the point is that any speaker you get used to mixing on can work just fine, if you are willing to do the work to understand how to mix on them.

    You will find B&W 805s and 801s, a higher end hi fi speaker, in lots of studios, including George Martin's AIR studios in London.

    Spendor and a few other British makers are licensed to produce BBC monitors, which are also sold in the hi-fi market.

    But I completely agree with Michael, with the exception of the very best hi fi home speakers, you're much better off with studio monitors, which are at least designed with the good intention of sounding neutral. Also, and this is important, studio monitors are usually designed to handle day-in, day-out use, and not to blow up at higher volume levels (the NS-10s of course WILL blow up, but as I said, they were originally hi fi speakers).
     
  6. alanfc

    alanfc Member

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    when I was shopping for nearfields I looked for the ones people said were the most "honest" , and they said NS-10's, KRK-8's and Yorkvilles. Then I read about the ear fatigue associated with the NS-10's and some said even the KRK-8's, so chose the Yorkvilles. Mine are powered. the model is YSM1-p. They're all I know, but I know I haven't had any ugly suprises when referencing my Yorkville mixes on other car& home stereos.
     
  7. GaryNattrass

    GaryNattrass Member

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    NS10's are dreadful IMO.

    Go for what the main stream are listening to Mackies or Dynaudios.
     
  8. rkruz

    rkruz Guest

    Great input. thanks.

    Is there a website that does reviews of monitors? Im want a bookshelf type to pu on stands.

    How about Carvin stuff? They are near near and I can return them if I dont like them.

    A pair of passive Event 2020 looks like in the $175 range. Each of the Carvins are that. If the value is there maybe thats the way to go.

    How about a older Carvin amp F300. What should I pay for it. Icant find anything on it to judge. Is x 150w in into 4 ohms.

    thanks again!
    .
     
  9. flashbax

    flashbax Guest

    Ok, The yamaha NS10s have been around for along time. I will give my two cents worth here. I have a pair in my home studio. I have mixed on them for years, and I have track records with them in studios. They are hard to get a good mix on but when you are there, you are there. I have been to studios with Tannoy and today's cheap thrill speakers. The mixes, once you get them out the door is lacking. The high end, audiophile speakers that are mentioned B&W are colored more than you think. They are for home listening and take extreme set up to get the sound right. They also lack a good bass respose. If you really want a set of speakers go UREI or Westlake. Those will cost you, but you can score a pair of UREIs on ebay. The westlakes will cost you your first born, but they are worth every cent.
     
  10. rkruz

    rkruz Guest

    thanks. My budget here is 300. So looking on Ebay looks like its Sampson, Alesis, KRK, Roland....All low end stuff I guess..but probably good enough for home studio without proper sound room...u think?
     
  11. flashbax

    flashbax Guest

    I got the yamahas for about that price. If that is your budget I would go with the Events20/20
     
  12. rkruz

    rkruz Guest

    thanks for the advise! Ill start there and see what I can find!

    Ill let you know what I end up with!

    thanks again!
     
  13. headstack

    headstack Member

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    NS-10 are pretty good with the right amp!!
    I used to run mine with a Bryston 4-b and Kimber 8-tc cable and they sound pretty darn good, for what they are.
    I like the Genelecs, but WAY out of the $300 range.
    Listen to the events with mixes you know well and see how you like the way they translate on that rig.
    Good luck!
     
  14. LSchefman

    LSchefman Member

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    Guys, Gary mixes sound for feature films, in London. He's pretty experienced with monitors.

    And the NS-10s are pretty awful monitors.
     
  15. GaryNattrass

    GaryNattrass Member

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    Now these are what I call MONITORS!!!!!! Me in Dubbing 1 at The Bill London.
    Sadly they arent bi-amped like the ones in Dubbing 3 which have a lot smoother bass response.
    [​IMG]

    For domestic and guide mixes we use our SONY Wega TV's
     
  16. headstack

    headstack Member

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    Those are nice!!
    Have you heard Boxers?
    If so, how do you like them?
    Thanks,
    John
     
  17. LSchefman

    LSchefman Member

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    >>Now these are what I call MONITORS!!!!!! Me in Dubbing 1 at The Bill London.<<

    Those are really nice! I worked with a set looking like those in Holland on a project, and I was blown away.

    Literally. ;)
     
  18. rkruz

    rkruz Guest

    After looking at my workspace, my PC is in a corner and I dont have that much room for midsize or book shelf size monitors on either side of it or to place reasonably so I can work and listen without have to move my listening position. . So I started looking at mini size. M-Audio has the DX4 (8.5h x 5.75W x 6.25d) which is biamped and small for $150. Also there is the larger BX5 for $300 which is larger then DX4 but still smaller then all other bookshelves in that price range. Its 9.85h x 6.5w x 8d. That is just about the limit is size so fit reasonably on either side of by PC Display so that I can work and listen without turning my head.

    any experience with those monitors?

    thx
     
  19. LSchefman

    LSchefman Member

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    The small M-Audio monitors got a good review I recently read, but I can't remember where.

    Take it with a grain of salt, but if they sound good, then they ARE good.
     
  20. rkruz

    rkruz Guest

    super! thank you for the advise!
     

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